Babylonian Captivity

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By gomez0777
Words 949
Pages 4
The Babylonian Captivity
(the key points)
The Babylonian exile was the period in Jewish history during which the Jews of the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylon.

According to the Hebrew Bible, there were three deportations of Jews to Babylon. The first, in 597 BCE, involving king Jeconiah and his court and many others, a second in 587 BCE of the next king, Zedekiah, and the rest of the people, and a possible deportation after the assassination of Gedaliah, the Babylonian-appointed governor of Yehud Province, possibly in 582 BCE. The forced exile ended in 538 BCE after the fall of Babylon to the Persian king Cyrus the Great, who gave the Jews permission to return to Yehud province and to rebuild the Temple; but most Jews chose to remain in Babylon.[citation needed]
The captivity and subsequent return to the Land of Israel and the rebuilding of the Second Temple in the Jerusalem are considered significant events in Jewish history and culture, which had a far-reaching impact on the development of Judaism.
The term "Babylonian captivity" is sometimes used when referring to the Avignon Papacy, a period of Medieval Catholic history, because of perceived parallels between the two.[1]
In the late 7th century BCE, the kingdom of Judah was a client state of the powerful Assyrian empire. In the last decades of the century Assyria was overthrown by Babylon, an Assyrian province with a history of former glory in its own right. Egypt, fearing the sudden rise of the Neo-Babylonian empire, seized control of Assyrian territory up to the Euphrates river in Syria, but Babylon counter-attacked and in the process Josiah, the king of Judah, was killed in the Battle of Megiddo (609 BC), although the circumstances are obscure.
After the defeat of the Egyptians by the Babylonians at Carchemish in 605 BC, Jehoiakim began paying tribute to Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon.…...

Similar Documents

Babylonian Law

...Babylonian Law Over the years there have been many civilizations; some which have had great success and wonderful breakthroughs and others that could barely survive. Some of these civilizations unruly or chaotic so to speak while other formed laws and created order. Order was the key to these societies survival and one civilization set the tone for the rest. That civilization was that of Babylon; they formed that order with an abundance of laws. Now after reading “Babylonian law: How an early state regulated it’s subjects” from J.M. Powis Smith I will compare Babylon to modern day America. Based on my reading of the article “Babylonian Law” I have found that this society was quite intolerant of most crimes. For example Law 1 of The Code says “If a man accuses a man, and charges him with murder, but cannot convict him, the accuser shall be put to death.” It is clear to me that this society has very strong values and will not just look the other way if an incident occurs. To me it is also apparent that the Babylonian society believed very heavily in getting even. In law 196 The Code states “If a man destroys the eye of another man, they shall destroy his eye.” The belief in getting even is also apparent in law 197 The Code states “If he breaks a man’s bone, they shall break his bone.” Although I feel that the Babylonian society has very high values to me some of their laws were a little extreme. I can see a few similarities in the Babylonian laws and those of modern day...

Words: 783 - Pages: 4

World

... Assyrian monuments is not mentioned in the sacred texts, but the fall of the northern kingdom of Israel in 722 BC (to Sargon II, though erroneously credited to Shalmaneser in 2 Kings) is noted. Supposedly ‘10 tribes of the Jewish race’ were lost through conquest. This is what archaeologists have learned from their excavations in the Land of Israel . The united monarchy of David and Solomon, which is described by the Bible as a regional power, was at most a small tribal kingdom. Assyrian cuneiform states that 27,290 captives were taken from Samaria, the capital of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, by the hand of Sargon II. Sargon records his first campaign on the walls of the royal palace at Dur-Sharrukin. The description of the final defeat of the Northern Kingdom of Israel above appears to be a minor event in Sargon's legacy. Some historians attribute the ease of Israel's defeat to the previous two decades of invasions, defeats, and deportations. Some estimates assume a captivity numbering in the hundreds of thousands, minus those who died in defense of the kingdom and minus those who fled voluntarily before and during the invasions. However, it has also been suggested that the numbers deported by the Assyrians were rather limited and the bulk of the population remained in situ. There is also evidence that significant numbers fled south to the kingdom of Judah. Unlike the Kingdom of Judah, which was able to return from its Babylonian......

Words: 562 - Pages: 3

Methods of Evangelism

... millennial reign here on earth. Amos gives a warning to Israel for their rebellion against God. ● lack of food (Amos 4:6) ● Drought, (Amos 4:7) ● Blight and mildew of their crops (Amos 4:9) ● Locust invasions that destroyed their crops (Amos 4:9) ● Pestilence and disease (Amos 4:10) ● Military defeat and exile (Amos 4:10-11). Why were these warnings given? Because of Israel’s disobedience to God and their backsliding into idolatry. Look what is happening in the United States today. God has been taken out of the schools, out of the Government, out of many of our homes. The children are growing up not knowing God and are growing up into Government positions. These are our new leaders of our country and God will and has taken His Hand of protection off of our country. The same way that He did with the Israelites just before the Babylonian captivity. The parallels between these two countries is so unique. This nation needs to return to God and get on their knees and pray for forgiveness. Idolatry was and major issue with the prophets, trying to get His people back on track but they would not listen so God sent the Babylonians to apply some pressure to return or punishment to make them listen. What is America’s idols? Money, TV’s, Computers, Cars, Games, materialism. America is caught up in seeking self and forgetting others. Drugs, sex, and money, these are the idols that will destroy this country. As Christians we are to be on guard at all times,......

Words: 584 - Pages: 3

Rowlandson Captivity

...Jaime Huamani HIS 148-American History to 1865 Professor Palenscar February 4, 2013 Rowlandson’s Captivity Imagine yourself in a point of time where Puritans whose village would be attacked by Native American Indians. A book called Classic American Autobiographies tells about a short narrative story called A true history of the captivity and restoration of mrs. Mary rowlanson. Around the 1600’s, a puritan women named Mary Rowlandson would be captured by Indians and held captive for eleven weeks until she could finally escape. She was only able to endure her captivity only through the faith in God. Instead of Mary facing hardships daily from the Indians, she continually traced the goodness of God in keeping her safe from even further harm. That’s why in the following one will understand about what we learned from the Native American Tribe, the view that Mary wants the readers to see, and if any change upon Mary of her thoughts and behavior as time goes by. One will learn about the Native American Tribe that was holding Mary Rowlandson in captivity. Firstly, the Indians are to be described as beasts, barbarous creatures, murderous and wolves. These descriptions are taken from the Mary personal statement describing her personal feelings and actual experiences while watching horrific scenes taking place before her eyes. On page 28, Mary states “There was one who was chopped into the head with a hatchet, and stripp’d naked, and yet was crawling up and down. It...

Words: 819 - Pages: 4

King Cyprus

...Esssay# 4 What i sthe role of the Persian King Cyrus in the second Isaiah? The book of Isaiah itself, especially the second Isaih focus on the return of Jewish from captivity. Way before the exile, the prophet Isaiah, not only predicted that Yahweh will let his people go in captivity in Babylon but also the rise of Persian King Cyrus who will deliver them from captivity. So, what was really the role of king Cyrus in second Isaiah? According to the Bible and Cyrus cylinder( which is exhibit in British musueum) Babylonians were sick and tired of their King Nabonidus considered a tyrant with strange religious ideas. So, in October 539 BCE , the second part of Isaiah prediction materialized. Cyrus defeated the king of Babylon Nabonidus in a bloodless battle. Since all the subject provinces didn`t like Nabonidus , they all gather and recognize Cyrus as their legitimate ruler brought by their gods in response to their prayers. Soon after the victory, Cyrus free all the nations without taking anybody in captivity. Basically, king Cyrus first liberate the subject provinces and the babylonian from the hardship imposed by Nabonidus and then allow the Jews to go back to Juda and built a temple at Jerusalem for Yahweh. First, Nabonidus through his reign eliminated the celebration of the festival of new year. he neglected all the gods( nabo, bel,..) in existence before his kingship. He also turn in abomination the workship of Babylonian king of god Narduck. He also...

Words: 401 - Pages: 2

Babylonian Captivity

...The Babylonian Captivity (the key points) The Babylonian exile was the period in Jewish history during which the Jews of the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylon. According to the Hebrew Bible, there were three deportations of Jews to Babylon. The first, in 597 BCE, involving king Jeconiah and his court and many others, a second in 587 BCE of the next king, Zedekiah, and the rest of the people, and a possible deportation after the assassination of Gedaliah, the Babylonian-appointed governor of Yehud Province, possibly in 582 BCE. The forced exile ended in 538 BCE after the fall of Babylon to the Persian king Cyrus the Great, who gave the Jews permission to return to Yehud province and to rebuild the Temple; but most Jews chose to remain in Babylon.[citation needed] The captivity and subsequent return to the Land of Israel and the rebuilding of the Second Temple in the Jerusalem are considered significant events in Jewish history and culture, which had a far-reaching impact on the development of Judaism. The term "Babylonian captivity" is sometimes used when referring to the Avignon Papacy, a period of Medieval Catholic history, because of perceived parallels between the two.[1] In the late 7th century BCE, the kingdom of Judah was a client state of the powerful Assyrian empire. In the last decades of the century Assyria was overthrown by Babylon, an Assyrian province with a history of former glory in its own right. Egypt, fearing the sudden rise of the...

Words: 949 - Pages: 4

Essay About Animal Captivity

...Captivity Industry In my opinion there is no doubt that marine animals should not be held in captivity. Marine mammals are a part of nature and should not be bought, sold or thrown in an aquarium. I believe that they have the right to be kept in their natural environment. There are many convincing reasons to support this opinion. Captivity causes many health problems in marine mammals. Many tanks have water full of chemicals and bacteria; these results in blindness and many skin problems in dolphins and other marine mammals. Marine mammals in captivity die from pneumonia, ulcers and other stress related diseases. Most of these helpless creatures suffer from boredom. Dolphins in the wild can swim from 40-100 miles per day but in pools they go around swimming in repetitive patterns. Due to boredom and limited space many dolphins abuse themselves; they often bang their heads against tank and aquarium walls. Some of these poor innocent creatures face abusive treatment by their caretakers, thus shortening their lifespan. In fact Keiko, the killer whale, the star of Free Willy, was a victim of this type of abuse. Marine mammals breed very poorly in captivity with very high infant death rates. For this reason, when a baby dolphin is born into captivity its birth is usually kept a secret from its mother until it shows signs of survival. Marine mammals do breed in captivity, but the birth rate in captivity is not as successful as in the wild. Many people think that...

Words: 864 - Pages: 4

Legal, Ethical & Social Values on Having Animals in Captivity

...Nova Southeastern University Wayne Huizenga Graduate School of Business & Entrepreneurship Assignment for Course: MGT 5015 – Legal, Ethical, & Social Values In Business Submitted to: Stephen Muffler Submitted by: Juan Cochesa N01566041 350 NE 24th St APT 509 Miami, FL 33137 305 799 0736 Date of Submission: 03 / 16 / 2014 Title of Assignment: Legal, Ethical & Social Values on Having Animals In Captivity CERTIFICATION OF AUTHORSHIP: I certify that I am the author of this paper and that any assistance I received in its preparation is fully acknowledge and disclosed in the paper. I have also cited any sources from which I used data, ideas of words, whether quoted directly or paraphrased. I also certify that this paper was prepared by me specifically for this course. Student Signature: ___________________________ ******************************************* Instructor’s Grade on Assignment: Instructor’s Comments: I. Introduction II. Legal Section A. Licensing Requirements B. Accommodation C. Nutrition D. Sanitation and Disease Control E. Veterinary Care F. General Welfare G. Safety and Security H. Operations III. Ethics Section A. Utilitarian Ethical Analysis B. Kantian Ethical Analysis C. Aristotelian Ethical Analysis IV. Social Responsibility Section V. Conclusion VI. References ABSTRACT Animals are one of the most...

Words: 7273 - Pages: 30

Mammal vs. Marine Captivity

... to be realized is that animals and marine mammals are adept of experiencing the same emotions if not more then humans. They are highly intelligent beings that are unable to speak up for their well-being. As human beings it should be our duty to protect and help these creatures flourish. In recent years, research has proven that the captivity of all wild animals is inhumane and extremely harmful to the well being of the animal as a whole. At the Dallas, Texas Zoo “a gorilla named Jabari tried to escape by jumping over the walls and moats of his enclosure, only to be fatally shot by police”(PETA). It was later investigated and concluded through a witness that Jabari was placed under extreme distress after being tormented by teenagers who threw large rocks directly at him for an extended period of time. The only ethical permit to allow the existence of zoos should be one that makes the well being of a species present and future a priority. Zoos have lost their purpose and direction. Instead of zeroing in on the needs of their animals, the executives who sit behind a desk and control the money are more focused on the financial and entertainment aspect the zoo has to offer. Just recently the documentary, Blackfish, caused uproar among society by exposing to the inhumane and unjust treatment of sea life at SeaWorld. This single documentary has created one of the largest movements SeaWorld has ever faced; SeaWorld’s corporation is facing the possible loss of every park and any...

Words: 870 - Pages: 4

Indian Captivity Narratives

...Primary Source Analysis Option 1 Biying Deng HIST 180 Daniel Borses September 29, 14 After reading the Indian Captivity Narratives, it is clear that both narratives describes the author’s captivity life under Indians; however, their experience were totally different. According to The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, Mary Rowlandson suffered from poor condition with her captors for two months; the experience was a nightmare to her. On the contrary, Mary Jemison had a happier life during the captive as seen in her Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison. The life before they were taken captive was the key that resulted the difference between their experiences. With the different growth environment, class, and life experience, their results are going on the opposite way. According to the resources, Mary Rowlandson was an English Puritan woman, had husband and children and with “ health, and wealth, wanting nothing.” (Rowlandson 57) Obviously, Rowlandson’s family was in a high class and she had a very happy life before taken captive. At her age, the ethics and values have already formed; and she had strong concept of her family and faith. Thus, after Rowlandson faced the death of her sister and townspeople, the destroy of her family and town, she was despaired and thought of death. “I had often before this said, that if the Indians should come, I should chuse rather to be killed by them then taken alive.” (Rowlandson 53) However, she kept alive and...

Words: 820 - Pages: 4

Captivity Breeds Agression

...Captivity Breeds Aggression Lucas Terry Colorado Technical University March 1, 2015 In human history, captivity, slavery, and colonization resulted to uprisings, revolts, and revolutions elsewhere in the world. The numerous human histories on this matter can be equated to how animals in captivity resort to aggressive actions that even escalate to killings. In the documentary movie entitled “Blackfish,” no matter how the lawyers and spokespersons of Sea World argue against the idea that the killings of trainers were caused by the aggressiveness of the killer whales, it always boils down to the philosophy that the oppressed creatures naturally fights back. And if the killer whales fight back, pitiful are the trainers who will get victimized. “Blackfish” is a documentary of how ORCAs like Tilikum were captivated in various environments and put to captivity to be trained for animal shows. The documentary presents the owners of the animal show businesses like Sea World as the villains while the former trainers of Sea World who disclosed issues about the killings of their colleagues, and all the informants who told the truth are the heroes. The good thing about the documentary is that they have variety of sources. They even spoke to the diver that who explained how ORCAs are captured. That person was even one of those who captured Tilikum. The documentary also put in the film how the killer whales were trained and tamed by specialist who used their knowledge on...

Words: 805 - Pages: 4

The Narative of Captivity Mary Rolandson

...History records the time during the King Phillip’s war as one of the most important times of English-Indian era. It was the time when much bloodshed was spilled and captives were captured on and off the field. The Native Americans held many Englishman, woman and children as captives where Mary Rowlandson, wife of the local minister and her three children, was one of them. She was one of the captive survivors who was snatched from the prosperity and thrown into wilderness. And there starts the tale of her survival. The Narrative of the captivity of Mary Rowlandson is one of the most famous captivity recorded on the literature genre of all times. This is an undeniably famous and well-crafted autobiography written by Rowlandson on her eleven weeks of captivity where she gives us the clear and detailed description of the days she spent with Native Americans. These eleven weeks put her test to physical and spiritual boundaries and most of all, faith in lord. She shows the faith and power of lord provided to her to overcome each and every sufferings pain and the will power to move on, no matter what. As the Narrative states, Rowlandson is vividly shown as a strict follower of God and a believer in faith. It is the God, who built faith in her for her survival. Lord has been a wheelchair to her broken life to make her go on in the quest of finding her home, her loved ones and as a whole her life. She had been dragged...

Words: 1660 - Pages: 7

The Disappearance of Ancient Babylonian Civilization

...The disappearance of Ancient Babylonian civilization For over three thousand years ago, Ancient Babylon went up in smoke in a sudden, leaving a mystery for people around the world. Ancient Babylon used to be a strong kingdom that conquered a lot of lands and it is also famous for its amazingly beautiful “Hanging garden” and was regarded as a paradise. According to historical records, Ancient Babylon had such a spectacular landscape, therefore, the fact that Ancient Babylon disappeared seems to be fabulous. The reasons for the downfall of this kingdom can be summarized into three main aspects: the hostile environment, lack of morality and war. One reason for the disappearance of Ancient Babylonian civilization is the hostile environment. According to Smith (1924), “The natural environment of Ancient Babylon was extremely awful at that time, the exhausted hydro resources made the situation even worse.” (p.97). The environment became hostile because the governors did not have the conscious of sustainability. They developed agriculture at the cost of the environment and the nature paid back by yielding hostile climate that made people suffer. The hostile environment did influence the development of Ancient Babylon. However, the physical condition could not have significant effect on the kingdom, but people’s conscious as a whole and loyalty of Ancient Babylon directly accelerated the downfall of this kingdom. Lack of morality also contributed to the downfall of Ancient...

Words: 548 - Pages: 3

Captivity Essay

...Captivity had been around since the beginning of time. Mary Rowlandson and Olaudah Equiano wrote their experiences with captivity, with different messages in mind. They dealt with fear and terror while being subjected to the evils of captivity. Although they did deal with fear, they learned from their experiences. Both Mary Rowlandson and Olaudah Equiano suffered from the horrors of kidnapping; Mary Rowlandson was captured by Native Americans in 1864, while Olaudah Equiano was captured by African slave traders and later sold to white slave traders. Through life before, during, and after captivity, Mary Rowlandson and Olaudah Equiano can be compared and contrasted. Mary Rowlandson was a young mother of three living on the frontier under the constant threat of a Native American attack. “In February 1676, she [Mary] and her three children were carried away by a Wampanoag raiding party that wanted to trade hostages for money” (Rowlandson 35). The colony Mary lived in was surrounded by Native Americans. The attackers burned down houses and opened fire on the settlers, wounding and killing several of them, and taking a number of the survivors as captives. The Native Americans begin to lead their captives, including Rowlandson and her three children, from the settlement into the surrounding wilderness. Olaudah Equiano was a member of the Ibo people, born in a part of West Africa that is now Nigeria. Olaudah was the youngest of the sons and became his mother’s favorite. His...

Words: 932 - Pages: 4

Is There Ethical Treatment for Animals in Captivity?

...Is there ethical treatment for animals in captivity? The term “ethical” implies the moral basis of treatment towards animals while “captivity” denotes confinement or lack of freedom. The unmistakable contrast in these two words itself creates the argument whether ethical treatment is possible for animals in captivity. Humans had often been overly considerate about moral principles while dealing with its own kind. Whenever ethics were encroached upon, man stood up against it, questioned it and regained it. But unfortunately, lacking advanced communication like humans, animals are unable to. Human intervention in wildlife has bereaved animals of total control over their own lives. Man may reason out his intrusion, yet, the animals in captivity, being deprived of their natural habitats and having bred in man-made enclosures for generations, tend to misperceive their animality. It is indispensable to have an insight into what causes the bereavement of animals and how it is caused, before looking into its moral principles. Among the contrastive places that I came across in which animal captivity is proceeded, wildlife preservation zoos are the most popular, and least considered as a confinement of animal freedom. Thousands of people visit zoos daily but rarely give a thought to the miserable lives that animals have to spend stagnating and sleeping, due to the less spacious and artificial residences provided. Some present enclosures in zoos have been changed to natural...

Words: 2181 - Pages: 9