Basic Human Body Structure Units and Their Functions

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1.1 Describe the four basic human body structure units and their functions
The four basic human body structures and their functions are as follows:
• Cells
• Tissues
• Organs
• Systems

Cells
Cells have been identified as the simplest unit of living matter that can maintain life.

A cell is the simplest and smallest unit of living matter and cells can live independently and can also reproduce themselves.

Cells exist in a varity of shapes and sizes including elongated, oval, and square, cells also have many different function.

A group of cells is called a tissue and the study of the structure, form of cells and tissue is called histology.

Tissues
Tissue is a group/organisation of a number of similar cells, not all identical but from the same origin, that carry out a similar function, which also consists of varying amounts and varity of non-living, intercellular substance between them. It is the level between cells and organs.

There are four types of tissue:

Epithelial – tissue that is widespread throughout the body. They form the covering of all the body surfaces and are the main tissue found in glands. Epithelial tissue performs a variety of functions that include protection, secretion, absorption, filtration and sensory reception.

Connective - tissue that binds structures together, and forms a framework and support for organs and the body as a whole. Connective tissue also acts as a transport system for substances to be carried around the body, and helps store fat. This type of tissue helps protect the body against disease and helps repair tissue damage. They occur throughout the body and are able to reproduce, but not as quickly as epithelial tissue.

Nervous – tissue is found in the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. It coordinates and controls many of the body’s activities. It stimulates muscle contraction, and plays a major role in…...

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