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Battle in Seattle Critical Response

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Submitted By tyrus33
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Battle in Seattle Critical Response Essay The movie "Real Battle in Seattle" is based on the real life events that occurred on November 30, 1999 in Seattle, Washington. A group consisting of at least 40,000 (Oldham 2) well organized and trained individuals converged on Seattle, Washington for the World Trade Organization conference that was being held there. They were there to protest corporate globalization and better inform the world of the WTO and what it meant for earth as a whole. But as history shows, they were attacked with tear gas, pepper sprayed, shot with rubber bullets, and beaten. The movie, "Real Battle in Seattle", varied from what actually happened on November 30, 1999 even though its purpose was to accurately portray these events. Between the Hollywood version and the actual version a couple of things stick out. One of the main characters, Jay, was a key player in the organizing of this protest but it doesn't seem that he does it fully because of a belief against the WTO. It seems as if he does it out of revenge for his brother who was killed in the movie by some police at a different protest. This comes off to me as a viewer as if he's doing it partly out of hatred towards the police/government rather than because of an underlying belief that corporate globalization is wrong. Also, Django who was an activist portrayed in the movie, seemed more focused on the WTO's ruling against the Endangered Species Act which left sea turtles at harm towards the international fishing industry then he was towards the more major points at hand such as the injustices at companies such as Monsanto and Cargill and also towards patents that prevent third world countries from being able to obtain medicines and food necessary for survival. The other problem I had with the movie involved how the activists were portrayed. It made it seem as if these people were...

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