Battle of Saratoga

In: Historical Events

Submitted By carina18
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The Battle of Saratoga:
And its effects of the United States

Carina Alvarez
HIST101
American history to 1877
Daniel Hicks
25 November 2012

The American Revolution was the war fighting for American independence in 1775. Within this war there were many smaller events that lead to the actual American independence in July 1776. Once the United States declared itself independent there was still a long way to go before other countries truly considered the United States to be its own Country. At this point in history, the Battle of Saratoga came into play. There were many things that the U.S needed to gain a victory in the Battle of Saratoga against the British. The Battle of Saratoga was actually made up of two battles, The Battle of Freeman’s Farm and The Battle of Bemis Heights. The effects of these battles were crucial aspects in the history of the United States.
The Battle of Freeman’s Farm was the first battle of Saratoga. The battle took place in the clearing around the farm of Loyalist John Freeman on September 19th, 1777.[1] This battle had a lot less detail and was fairly shorter than the second battle. Neither the Americans nor the British seemed to have won The Battle of Freeman's Farm.
The ensuing battle raged back and forth until nightfall, when the American forces were finally forced to break contact. At the close of the battle, Lieutenant General John Burgoyne, commander of the British forces at the battle, held the field.[2]

The Second battle involved in The Battle of Saratoga was called the Battle of Bemis Heights. This battle was directed by British Commander Lieutenant General John Burgoyne. This battle took place on October 7th, 1777.[3]
The three British columns moved out from their Freeman's Farm fortifications in order to gain more information about the rebel positions at Bemis Heights. American General Horatio Gates, assumed to be…...

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