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Battle of Saratoga

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The battle of Saratoga had three important results to it. There was how it lifted the Americans spirits after all their recent loses to the British. There is also how the Americans finally won against the British and got them to surrender. And most important how the Americans finally convinced the French to ally with them, because they showed the French that they could win.

As it turns out, the Battle of Saratoga was the turning point in the Americans' War of Independence. Actually, there were two battles at Saratoga, New York. The first began with Gen. John Burgoyne's offensive on September 19, the second with the climactic phase of the fighting during the Battle of Bemis Heights on October 7.

After protracted negotiations, Burgoyne officially surrendered on October 17. He returned to England in disgrace, and was never given another command.
When news of the American victory reached Europe, France entered the war on the side of the patriots. Money and supplies flowed to the American cause, providing Washington's Continental Army with the support necessary to continue its fight against Great Britain.
Britain's loss at Saratoga proved disastrous, in that it signaled to the European powers that the rebels were capable of defeating the English on their own. More than any other single event, it would prove decisive in determining the eventual outcome of the War.
The victory in The Battle of Saratoga was a very important victory in the Revolutionary War. It brought the French into the war. This now showed the Americans had a chance to win. The French felt that it was now worth fighting for the Americans now that they had a chance to win. The Americans had more confidence after the win at The Battle of Saratoga.
The Battle of Saratoga was a major setback to the British force. It showed that the Americans were a strong fighting force. It also brought the French...

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