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Behavioral Organization

In: Business and Management

Submitted By malikbahi
Words 1975
Pages 8
Zaka Mahmood
Ethical Concepts in Health Care
Davenport University
HLTH 230
Patricia Spiegel

Abstract
Primary health care as we see is an essential base of building our health system. Advanced development and new tools must consist of operational and supportive relations with the primary health care, along with recommending arrangements to ensure the population of their coverage as to their relevant needs, and be dependable with ethical guidelines linked to the public’s health and the health care.

Heading

The task of this presentation is to collaborate different issues. Consisting of new development in the health sector, critically providing more effective and indifferent health care along with an improving attitude towards the health population, mainly in developing countries. Primary health care as we see is an essential base of building our health system. Advanced development and new tools must consist of operational and supportive relations with the primary health care, along with recommending arrangements to ensure the population of their coverage as to their relevant needs, and be dependable with ethical guidelines linked to the public’s health and the health care. Most importantly, we would not like for the various advances health sector to utilize helplessly or isolate them self’s from one another, but take the effort to interact and advance complementary components of systems that have a global integrated nature. Now, we redirect to the three set of sources that might have the ability for contributing more effective means of coping towards the encounters of ill health in our world. Specifically, in countries that are developing.
First, ethical concepts used in health care are going to be discussed. The ethical concept will be divided in to fairness, equity and human rights, Second, biomedical research and clinical studies in healthcare will be...

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