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Bible Summaries of the Old Testament

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Submitted By moormana
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Name: Aaron Moorman
Student ID: L26155198
Course: BIBL 104
Date: 26OCT2013
Summary of the books of the Old Testament

Deuteronomy
The book of Deuteronomy is primarily a book of law that includes the Ten Commandments. The word Deuteronomy actually means “Second Law”. It describes how Deuteronomy locates Moses and gathered the people (Israelites) into the province of Mohab. As his last and final act at this significant time of transferring leaderships to Joshua, Moses delivered his farewell speeches in order to prepare the people for their movement into Canaan. In that speech Moses emphasized the laws that were especially needed at such a decisive moment, and he presented them in such a way that was vastly important to the situation at hand. Deuteronomy’s purpose was to prepare the new generation of the Lord’s chosen people to be his kingdom’s council in the land that he had absolutely promised them in the Abraham covenant (Deu 29). Moses’ final acts as the Lord’s appointed servant for Israel are so important and meaningful that Deuteronomy’s account of them marks the finale of the Pentateuch (first 5 books of the OT).

Exodus
The genre of the book of Exodus is largely a narrative of the departure of God’s people from slavery in Egypt into the desert. Exodus literally means “exit” or “departure”. Keys names mentioned throughout the book are Moses, Aaron, Miriam, Pharaoh, Joshua, and Jethro. The book contains numerous accounts of plagues: frogs, gnats, flies, hail, locusts, and plagues on livestock. The book of Exodus was not intended to exist alone, but instead was thought to be an annex or continuance of a narrative that began in Genesis, then completed in Numbers, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy. This book accounts of God’s call to his people to deliver them from slavery in Egypt and begin a covenant with them somewhere in the rural desert. God...

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