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Bilingual Education Policy

In: English and Literature

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Bilingual Education Policy It has been 36 years since the implementation of the bilingual education policy yet over the past decades the policy was always questioned on whether it is really helpful or not (Espiritu). The policy was defined operationally as “the separate use of English and Filipino as the media of instruction in specific subject areas” and is working on the assumption that there is a certain degree of mastery of Filipino within the student (Espiritu; Isidro et al. 113). In line with the definition, the main goals of using English and Filipino as media of instruction are (1) to bring quality education, (2) to develop Filipino for exchanging of ideas, (3) to develop English as the international language and (4) to develop competence in both English and Filipino (Espiritu). Operating under these goals and since learning involves the teacher and the student, the implementation of bilingual education policy in the Philippines is beneficial for both the students and the teachers. The bilingual education policy plays three vital roles in student’s personal success. First is that bilingual education policy provides greater job opportunities for students after graduation. Because of the bilingual education policy, students will be more exposed to the use of English and Filipino in daily conversations and soon they will develop communication skills in these languages which they could use as an asset in finding jobs. Furthermore, according to Cloud, Genesee, and Hamayan, persons with more than one language of competence can handle specialized jobs compared to monolingual individuals (4). For example, local companies based in Manila would usually require at least good communication skills in Filipino, while multinational companies needs English fluent applicants. The second role that bilingual education policy does is that it helps students acquire better...

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