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Bill of Rights 2

In: Social Issues

Submitted By jesselangley
Words 354
Pages 2
Hello Mr.President, Why are rights not absolute here is a reason for you and the whole nation Mr. President.The Right to Free Speech does not allow you to yell "Fire" in a movie theater, becauses when they start conflicting with the rights of others, they aren't absolute. As another example, the right to religion does not allow you to marry 13 year old girls even if it is your religion. There are limits on all of the rights enshrined in the Bill of Rights, but when they are limited, they are subject to strict scrutiny by the courts. Plus, the rights are only protected from government transgression. Your employer can limit your right to free speech, just like your apartment complex can violate your 4th amendment rights. Just yesterday the government forced elderly people to leave their homes, to "save" their lives, yet half of them just wanted to be left alone to deal with the disaster by themselves. In the Bill of Rights it states that people cannot be forced by the government to leave their homes; however, in some cases when that person is a terrorist or a wanted criminal it is legal. My position in this matter is that I wouldn't let them do this to innocent family but if one of the family members was involved in a crime I understand that problems you could evacuated he or she from their homes only if you have a warrant and I think the officials would agree on this.

Plus a week earlier citizens were denied the right to bring legally owned firearms to storm shelters. The constitutional amendment that relates to the first situation is second amendment. The arguments that would be made is that it would prevent in crime in a innocent areas or neighborhood. My position in this situation is that I wouldn't let them walk with their firearms anywhere and the officials would agree with me because walking with firearms could potenetially cause alot of problems.

(Short...

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