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Birth and Death Rates

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Birth and Death Rates in Miami

Miami’s birth and death rates have fluctuated over the past few years. Miami is a major city located around the Atlantic coast of southern Florida. Florida is one of the most common states and also the fastest developing state at this time. Miami is currently the 42nd leading city in the United States (Census Bureau, 2009). Miami includes a very large number of people with a broad variety of racial, religions, and ethnics in the city (Census Bureau, 2009). Birth rate is the number of live births per 1000 females in the population ranging from ages 15-44. The birth rates in Miami-Dade County had a little decrease between the years if 2006-2007 and a small increase between the years of 2008-2009. The birth rate per 1000 females for ages 15-19 is 37.5%, which has approximately 22,016 births for 2009. Within the 22,016 births, 19,862 are unmarried mothers, which is 90.2% for 2009. The number of births to mothers younger than age 15 is currently 48. The birth rate for 2010 is 17.76 births per 1,000 females of the population in Miami-Dade County. The death rate is a record of the number of deaths due to a certain cause. In Miami-Dade County there were several causes of deaths. The death rate for breast cancer in 2009 was 19.6 deaths per 100,000 females (DOH, 2009). There were 18 suicide deaths and 36 homicide deaths as of 2009. Fetal and infant mortality rate is 18.9% deaths per 1,000 births and fetal deaths (Kids Count, 2009). The 18.9% includes all races and ages. There were approximately 9,000 deaths in people with AIDS in 2010. The majority of the population was African American or Blacks who died with AIDS. The total death rate for the city of Miami is 5.24 deaths per 1,000 people of the population.

References
Kids Count Data Center. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.datacenter.kidscount.org...

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