Blackadder

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jathusiyia
Words 1020
Pages 5
I will be comparing the soldiers’ experience from ‘Blackadder Goes Forth’, a television sitcom written by Ben Elton and Richard Curtis with ‘Journey’s End’ which is a play that projects the reality of the war written by R.C. Sherriff. These are two texts that convey a dark impression of WW1. The similarities between both the texts is that they both were set in the final stages of the war but with ‘Blackadder Goes Forth’ set in many different places whilst ‘Journey’s End’ was set in one common setting. However the differences in genre can sometimes increase or decrease the severity of the impression created for the audience. I personally think that ‘Blackadder Goes Forth’ is an anti-war message, where it mocks the way WW1 was orchestrated by the Generals and the government, whereas in ‘Journey’s End’, a serious play, the focus is more on the psychological, claustrophobic conditions of the war and what really happens in the war. Thus it has been said that ‘Journey’s End’ is a compelling account of warfare, based upon Sheriff’s own experience as a Captain in the East Surrey regiment, depicting war as a meaningless and destructive. However this leads me to the conclusion that Journey’s End creates a darker, sombre impression and mood with its realism rather than the comical Blackadder even though it had a tragic outcome.

R.C Sherriff mostly tries to implant a realistic picture of the war by looking at the horrors of war through its physical setting. Also the playwright used one setting for the entire script which takes place in the Officers trench, this can be seen as a claustrophobic environment where it is focusing more on the thoughts of the officers and their behind the scenes activity and also their reaction to calamitous consequences rather than being out there in midst of the battlefield. To deflect from the harsh side of the war, Sheriff made one character…...

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Love

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