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Bondage of the Will

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By nrwhigham
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Martin Luther considered by many to be a great theologian makes very strong arguments against Eramus concerning grace and free will in Bondage of the Will. Both men have strong view points and are both eloquent writers, Eramus believes that man has the power to either turn towards works that lead to salvation or he has the choice not to. Eramus writes to show that man can voluntarily choose (free will) salvation apart from God. Eramus seems to believe that there exists some type of cooperativeness with mankind and God. Whereas, Luther is writing to show that there exist no cooperativeness and salvation is the work of God alone. For the purposes of this paper I will discuss Luther’s arguments in sub-section two. In this paper I will review Luther’s argument regarding the inability of mankind to work to receive justification apart from the spirit, the strengths and weaknesses of his argument and give reasoning as to why I agree with Luther’s argument.
In this section Luther is attempting to correct errors made by others teaching as it related to works and grace. Luther is trying to give readers an understanding of Paul’s writings “For ‘no human being will be justified in his sight’ by deeds prescribed by the law,” (Rom 3:20). One of the key points Luther is trying to convey is that Paul is not speaking to a particular group of people. He is not referring only to the Jews, or the Pharisees or even exclusively to the Gentiles. Paul’s verbiage was inclusive in this scripture and in Luther’s mind should not have been any room for misinterpretation. Paul did not write to a specific group, he focused on the actions of all people. If Paul would have written directly to a group of people many would have thought that he was leaving out a particular group or that this was not written for everyone. When according to Luther it is not the people that he is addressing or...

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