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English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres

Instructor: Aaron Schab aschab@uidaho.edu 209 Brink Hall Department of English University of Idaho Course Meets: Life Sciences South 163 Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:30 am – 10:20 am January 9, 2013 – May 10, 2013

Course Description

In this class, we will learn about the basic conventions and terms used to understand and discuss the three major genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. This class will help you understand the sometimes baffling world of literature, and is intended to provide the general student with basic experience in literary analysis. Additionally, I hope this class will lead you to a lifelong appreciation for (and engagement with) reading literature. Although this class features extensive reading and writing, it is not necessary for you to be a bookworm or a writing superstar to succeed in this class – if you are willing to put in the time and effort to study, faithfully attend class, keep up on your reading and writing assignments and engage in our discussions and activities, you should have no trouble thriving in this course.

Learning Outcomes By the end of the semester, students enrolled in English 175 should achieve the following learning outcomes. 1. Speak intelligently about literature, and discuss literature using the terminology of the discipline. 2. Explain how literature “works.” 3. Make connections between literature and their own lives in ways that enlarge their understanding of the human condition. 4. Understand the continuing relevance of literature to society. 5. Love reading great literature.

General Philosophy

I expect students to be passionate about their college education. That means that I expect students who are driven, dedicated, hard working, focused, willing to learn, willing to teach, and always prepared for class in an adult environment. (Failing that, I expect students to at least not be obnoxious).

Text

The Norton Introduction to Literature, eds. Booth and Mays. 10th Edition. ISBN 0393934268. Available from the University of Idaho Bookstore and other fine retailers. Important note: Make certain that you purchase the full 10th edition of this text – the “portable” edition will not work for this class, nor will any of the earlier editions. Please bring your textbook to class. Although you will need to rely on your own memory (and study habits) for quizzes and exams, most in-­‐class discussions and activities rely on you having the textbook handy as a reference.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Other Required Materials • • • A pen for taking notes and quizzes, working on group discussion assignments, doodling, scratching your nose, etc. A notebook or some other source of paper suitable Computer (and internet) access for out-­‐of-­‐class writing assignments.

Basic Requirements

For each class, you should: 1. Read the assigned selection from The Norton Introduction to Literature. 2. Study the key terms. 3. Be prepared to discuss the reading in class. (Bring your textbook!) 4. Be prepared for a small group discussion activity based on the reading. 5. Be prepared to take a quiz covering the reading selections and key terms. In addition to the above list, each week you will post an entry to your Reading Journal (on our Blackboard Learn site). There is an exam at the end of each unit (fiction, poetry, drama). You are also responsible for a substantial literature essay towards the end of the semester.

Productive Learning Environment

This is primarily a discussion-­‐based class, and I expect students to be engaged, not passive. We don’t need distractions. Please leave children, pets, chewing tobacco, cell phones and other gadgets at home (or “off” in the last two cases), and do not chatter during lectures, discussions, quizzes, exams, or student questions—be polite and respectful of others. Believe it or not, you can make it 50 minutes without stuffing your face with Skoal or texting your mom.

Because of abuse (and because they’re completely unnecessary for this class), I do not allow the use of laptops or tablet computers in class. Period.

Also: Text-­‐messaging in class is the fastest way to get on my bad side. Don’t do it. Please.

If you have a problem with any of the policies above, please drop this class now. You've been warned.

Office Hours Brink 209

Monday: 11 am – 3 pm Tuesday: 7 am – 10 am Wednesday: By appointment only Thursday: 7 am – 10 am Friday: By appointment only My office hours are available for English 175 questions as well as any other concerns you may wish to discuss with me. Feel free to visit for any reason. You are always welcome to drop by my office during office hours, but it’s prudent to make an appointment in case I have a prior commitment.

Email

Email is the best way to reach me away from class. Please note that I rarely check my email between 8 pm and 6 am. Any email sent during that time frame will be attended to the following day. If you have a

question that you think might benefit the entire class, you can always post it on the Discussion Board on our Blackboard Learn site.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Blackboard Learn

All important class documents (this syllabus, the literary essay assignment sheet, etc.) and supplementary materials are posted on our Blackboard Learn (aka “BbLearn”) course site for easy reference throughout the semester. Additionally, your weekly Reading Journal will be submitted via BbLearn in an effort to save paper and add convenience for all of us. The Essay Proposal and Literary Essay will also be submitted via BbLearn. You can also use BbLearn to check your grades and ask questions on the Discussion Board.

Make-­‐Up Quizzes, Late Assignments, and Extra Credit

To keep things fair for everyone, there are no make-­‐up quizzes, late assignments, or extra credit assignments in this class. It is your responsibility to pay attention to the class schedule and manage your time accordingly. The major due dates are listed on the reading schedule and on BbLearn – you have the due dates far in advance and need to be responsible enough to meet the deadlines.

On the other hand, there are extra points built into the course, so you can miss one quiz or reading journal assignment without hurting your overall grade. Each quiz includes a bonus question just for fun, which can result in additional extra points. Tips for Success To help you manage your time, the reading schedule is available from the very beginning of the semester. Although the reading schedule is reasonable for a college-­‐level literature class, it is ambitious. Once you fall behind, it is very difficult to get caught back up. Do your best to keep on top of your reading assignments. If you plan ahead and are wise about time management (read a little bit every day, if possible), you should have no trouble.

The due dates for the Reading Journals, Exams, Essay Proposal, and Literary Essay are listed on the schedule at the end of this syllabus. These due dates are not negotiable. If you plan ahead and are wise about time management, you should have no trouble meeting the deadlines.

Class Grading and Course Components The course is divided into the following sections, which cover the three major genres of literature: Unit 1: Fiction Unit 2: Poetry Unit 3: Drama This course is graded according to a simple points system. A: 450 -­‐ 500 points B: 400 – 449 points C: 350 – 399 points D: 300 – 349 points F: 0 – 299 points

Course Grade: Your grade is weighted as follows: Components

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Percentage 15% 15% 30% 30% 10% 100%

Final 75 points 75 points 150 points 150 points 50 points 500 points

Reading Journal (15 assignments at 10 points each) Group Discussions/Activities (25 assignments at 3 points each) Quizzes (15 assignments at 10 points each) Exams (3 assignments at 50 points each) Essay (10 points for proposal/40 points for final essay) Final Grade

Attendance

Attendance in this class is mandatory. Because this is an active, discussion-­‐based class (rather than a passive, lecture-­‐based class), it is vital that you are in class (on time!) each and every class session. Although I do not assign a grade for attendance, you earn points in every class session (either via a quiz or a group discussion/activity). If you miss class, you lose those points and cannot make them up (except for official excused absences, of course). However, I have built extra points into the class so that you can miss two class periods without hurting your grade. Students who will miss class for official, sanctioned university activities (traveling for athletics, academic competitions, field trips, etc.) must make arrangements with me in advance (including official documentation excusing the absence) in order to avoid losing credit.

If you miss a class, you are responsible for knowing before the next class what you missed and what work is due the day you return. Ignorance is not an excuse. Ask another student what was covered in class (your discussion groups can help you out with this) and check BbLearn for assignments and due dates.

Participation

This class requires active participation. You must be prepared for class and ready to volunteer rather than expecting me to call on you. Participation includes being prepared (do your reading assignments in advance!), bringing your textbook to class, being ready to share ideas, and willing to engage in the group discussions/activities.

Reading Journal

Each week, you will write an entry in your online Reading Journal on BbLearn. This is a place for you to write your initial reactions, responses, and thoughts about the literature you are reading each week. No one can see your Reading Journal except for you and me, so it is a space where you can express yourself freely.

I will provide writing prompts for each Reading Journal assignment (on BbLearn) – some will ask specific questions, while others will require you to make connections on your own. Your Reading Journal is due each Friday by midnight.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Group Discussions/Activities

Although this course is designed to emphasize individual effort, it is important for students in college-­‐ level courses to engage in collaborative learning. Beginning the second week of class, students will be divided into smaller work groups in order to better connect with peers and engage with the material. The work groups will be remixed periodically, so you will have an opportunity to interact with a large cross-­‐section of your classmates. Group Discussions/Activities will come in a number of forms. I may ask your group to answer a specific question about the reading material and present the answer to the rest of the class, or to write an imitation of specific literary style, or perform a short act from a Shakespeare play while juggling live sockeye salmon. There will be a Group Discussion/Activity in nearly every class session, so make certain to always be prepared and have the reading assignment finished before coming to class.

Quizzes

At least once a week, you will complete a ten-­‐point quiz focused on reading selections, key terms, and in-­‐class discussions and lectures. The quizzes are intended to test your reading comprehension as well as the material covered in the classroom. The questions will be an assortment of multiple choice, true/false, fill-­‐in-­‐the-­‐blank, and short answer. Quizzes are not (usually) announced in advance, and getting a quiz on Monday doesn’t necessarily mean there won’t also be a quiz on Wednesday or Friday.

Exams

You will take three exams in this course, one for each genre unit: fiction, poetry, and drama. Each exam includes the following sections: 1. Multiple choice (reading comprehension and key terms), 2. Short answer (reading comprehension, key term definitions, passage identification/significance), and 3. Essay question. The essay questions build upon the work you’ve done with your Reading Journal and Group Discussions. There is no midterm for this class, and the Final Exam is simply Exam 3 (Drama), taken during our designated Final Exam Period.

Essay

An important component of learning about literature is writing about literature, which is why this course is geared toward active learning (writing and discussing the works you read). Although the essay is a substantial project (5 to 7 pages), it does not stand alone as an isolated project. Rather, the essay serves as a capstone for the course – all of your writing, thinking, and analysis in the journals, group discussions/activities, and essay questions will help you build the skills necessary to write an excellent literature essay. You will submit an Essay Proposal a few weeks before the Essay itself is due. This will allow us to work together to make certain you are on the right track with your ideas and research.

Plagiarism Policy Each semester, there are certain students who either do not understand what plagiarism is or simply think they can get away with it. I am very adept at detecting plagiarism, and I will not hesitate to penalize any student who is guilty of academic dishonesty in this course.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013) The Two Main Forms of Plagiarism

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1. Using someone else's work as your own, without citing the source. This includes direct copying, rephrasing, and summarizing, as well as taking someone else's idea and putting it in different words. 2. Not indicating directly quoted passages or ideas even while citing the work as a general source. The Consequences of Plagiarism

If any of your course work involves intentional plagiarism, I am empowered by regulation 0-­‐2 of the University Bulletin to award you a failing grade in the course. In addition, I will always refer the case to the Dean of Students who will bring charges against you for violating Article II of the UI Student Code of Conduct.

How to Avoid Plagiarism

The easiest way to avoid plagiarism is to refrain from using online sites (Wikepedia, SparkNotes) as study guides, thus removing the temptation to simply rewrite or summarize what someone else has said about a work of literature. Although it is important that you strive to write in a thoughtful and perceptive manner, it is much better to submit mediocre work written by you than to submit excellent work stolen off of the Internet. Although mediocre work results in a mediocre grade, work stolen off of the Internet results in you earning an F and disciplinary action from the Dean of Students Office. It’s really very simple: Do your own work. This class is all about YOU becoming immersed in the three major genres of literature, and the class is designed for YOU to learn through reading, writing, and interacting with your instructor and your classmates. You do everyone in the class a disservice when you cheat, copy material from other websites, or attempt other academically dishonest shortcuts.

Disability Support Services

Reasonable Accommodations Statement: Reasonable accommodations are available for you if you have a documented disability. Please notify me during the first week of class regarding accommodation(s) needed for the course. (If you delay notifying me, it can be difficult to make the necessary arrangements, and I cannot make retroactive accommodations). All accommodations must be approved through Disability Support Services located in the Idaho Commons Building, Room 312 (885-­‐7200; email at dss@uidaho.edu; see also www.access.uidaho.edu).

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Reading Schedule for English 175, Spring Semester 2013 Below is the list of required readings for the course, along with required tasks and important due dates. Please note that you are expected to read all of the explanatory material in each chapter as well as the specific stories, poems, and plays listed below. The reading assignments are due by the day listed. (So, for example, the reading assignment listed for Friday is due to be read by class time on Friday, and not after class that day).

Unit 1: Fiction Week One (Jan. 9 – Jan. 11): Introduction to the Course Reading Assignment: Wednesday | No reading assignment. Friday | pp 1-­‐9 – Introduction Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Jan. 11, by midnight) Week Two (Jan. 14 – Jan. 18): Fiction (Reading, Responding, Writing) | Plot Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 12-­‐49: Fiction (Reading, Responding, Writing) – “The Elephant in the Village of the Blind” “20/20,” Linda Brewer / “The Shabbat,” Marjane Satrapi / “Cathedral,” Raymond Carver / “Sample Writing” supplementary material Wednesday | No new reading. Friday | pp 79-­‐114; pp 123-­‐126: Plot – “The Shroud,” Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm / “The Jewelry,” Guy de Maupassant / “Sonny’s Blues,” James Baldwin / “Happy Endings,” Margaret Atwood Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Jan. 18, by midnight)

Week Three (Jan. 21 – Jan. 25): Initiation Stories: An Album | Narration and Point of View Reading Assignment: Monday | Class does not meet. (University of Idaho is closed for MLK Jr. Holiday). Wednesday | pp 128-­‐135; pp 149-­‐155: Initiation Stories – “Stepdaughters,” Max Apple / “A&P,” John Updike Friday | pp 156-­‐178: Narration and Point of View – “The Cask of Amontillado,” Edgar Allan Poe/ “Hills Like White Elephants,” Ernest Hemingway / “How,” Lorrie Moore / “Girl,” Jamaica Kincaid Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Jan. 25 by midnight) Week Four (Jan. 28 – Feb. 1): Character | Setting | Suburbia: An Album Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 179-­‐198; pp 791-­‐800: Character – “Barn Burning,” William Faulkner / “Why I Live at the P.O.,” Eudora Welty

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Wednesday | pp 225-­‐269: Setting – “The Lady with the Dog,” Anton Chekhov / “Flowering Judas,” Katherine Anne Porter / “A Pair of Tickets,” Amy Tan Friday | pp 271-­‐307: Suburbia – “The Country Husband,” John Cheever / “Long Ago Yesterday,” Hanif Kureishi / “The Lost World,” Michael Chabon Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Feb. 1 by midnight) Week Five (Feb. 2 – Feb. 8): Symbol and Figurative Language | Theme Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 308-­‐350: Symbol and Figurative Language – “The Birth-­‐Mark,” Nathaniel Hawthorne / “The Thing in the Forest,” A.S. Byatt / “A Wall of Fire Rising,” Edwidge Dancticat Wednesday | pp 782-­‐791: Symbol and Figurative Language “The Prophet’s Hair,” Salman Rushdie Friday | pp 351-­‐394: Theme – “The Open Boat,” Stephen Crane / “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings,” Gabriel Garcia Marquez / “Love Medicine,” Louise Erdrich / “The Grasshopper and the Bell Cricket,” Yasunari Kwabata Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Feb. 8 by midnight) Week Six (Feb. 11 – Feb. 15): The Longer Work (Melville and Kafka) | Critical and Historical Contexts: Women in Turn-­‐of-­‐the-­‐Century America Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 429-­‐457: The Longer Work – Bartleby, the Scrivener, Herman Melville Wednesday | pp 457-­‐489: The Longer Work The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka Friday | pp 602-­‐642: Women in Turn-­‐of-­‐the-­‐Century America – “The Story of an Hour,” Kate Chopin / “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Charlotte Perkins Gilman / “A Jury of Her Peers,” Susan Glaspell / Plus the contextual selections at the end of the chapter Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Feb. 15 by midnight) Week Seven (Feb. 18 – Feb. 22): Cultural and Historical Contexts: The Jazz Age | Critical Contexts: William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” Reading Assignment: Monday | Class does not meet. (University of Idaho is closed for Presidents’ Day Holiday). Wednesday | pp 643-­‐678: The Jazz Age – “Babylon Revisited,” F. Scott Fitzgerald / “Echoes of the Jazz Age,” F. Scott Fitzgerald / Plus the contextual material at the end of the chapter Friday | pp 679-­‐715: Critical Contexts – “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner / Plus the critical selections that follow Faulkner’s story in the chapter Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, Feb. 22 by midnight) Exam 1 (Fiction): In class on Friday, Feb. 22.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Unit 2: Poetry Week Eight (Feb. 25 – March 1): Poetry (Reading, Responding, Writing) | Romantic Love: An Album Reading Assignment: Monday | No new reading. Wednesday | pp 820-­‐844: Poetry (Reading, Responding, Writing) – “How Do I Love Thee?,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning / “The Tally Stick,” Jarold Ramsey / “love poem,” Linda Pastan / “Married Love,” Liz Rosenberg / “On My First Son,” Ben Johnson / “The Vacuum,” Howard Nemerov / “Fifth Grade Autobiography,” Rita Dove / “The Fury of Overshoes,” Anne Sexton / “Mid-­‐Term Break,” Seamus Heaney / “On Her Loving Two Equally,” Aphra Behn / Plus the two Sample Writing selections at the end of the chapter Friday | pp 846-­‐853: Romantic Love – “The River-­‐Merchant’s Wife: A Letter,” Ezra Pound / “[Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone],” W.H. Auden / “To My Dear and Loving Husband,” Anne Bradstreet / “[Let me not to the marriage of true minds],” William Shakespeare / “Last Night,” Sharon Olds / “The Sun Rising,” John Donne / “[Women have loved before as I love now],” Edna St. Vincent Millay / “[I, being born a woman and distressed],” Edna St. Vincent Millay / “Porphyria’s Lover,” Robert Browning / “Of the Theme of Love,” Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, March 1 by midnight) Week Nine (March 4 – March 8): Theme and Tone | Speaker | Situation and Setting Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 854-­‐865: Theme and Tone – “Barbie Doll,” Marge Piercy / “Leaving the Motel,” W.D. Snodgrass / “In the Time of Plague,” Thom Gunn / “Hard Rock Returns to Prison from the Hospital for the Criminally Insane,” Etheridge Knight / “London,” William Blake / “Woodchucks,” Maxine Kumin / “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers,” Adrienne Rich Wednesday | pp 878-­‐893: Speaker – “The Ruined Maid,” Thomas Hardy / “In a Prominent Bar in Secaucus One Day,” X.J. Kennedy / “Death of a Young Son by Drowning,” Margaret Atwood / “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister,” Robert Browning / “A Certain Lady,” Dorothy Parker / “She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways,” William Wordsworth / “Hanging Fire,” Audre Lorde / “To a Louse,” Robert Burns / “We Real Cool,” Gwendolyn Brooks / “[I celebrate myself, and sing myself],” Walt Whitman / “Tu Do Street,” Yusef Komunyakaa Friday | pp 912-­‐939: Situation and Setting – “Daystar,” Rita Dove / “To a Daughter Leaving Home,” Linda Pastan / “Dover Beach,” Matthew Arnold / “[Full many a glorious morning have I seen],” William Shakespeare / “The Good-­‐Morrow,” John Donne / “Morning Song,” Sylvia Plath / “Morning,” Billy Collins / “Cherrylog Road,” James Dickey / “The Flea,” John Donne / “To His Coy Mistress,” Andrew Marvell Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, March 8 by midnight)

Week Ten (March 11 – March 15): Spring Break No reading assignment or journal this week. You are welcome to work on your Essay Proposal and the other Week Eleven tasks if you don’t have more delightful Spring Break plans.

Week Eleven (March 18 – March 22): Language | The Sounds of Poetry | Words and Music Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 947-­‐993: Language – “[The golf links lie so near the mill],” Sarah Cleghorn / “Slim Cunning Hands,” Walter de la Mare / “My Papa’s Waltz,” Theodore Roethke / “Sex without Love,” Sharon Olds / “At the San Francisco Airport,” Yvor Winters / “Lies,” Martha Collins / “[I dwell in Possibility—],” Emily Dickinson / “The Red Wheelbarrow,” William Carlos Williams / “This Is Just to Say,” William Carlos Williams / “Rorschach,” Jeanne Marie Beaumont / “[That time of year thou mayest in me behold],” William Shakespeare / “Marks,” Linda Pastan / “A Red, Red Rose,” Robert Burns / “[Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?]” William Shakespeare / “The Leap,” James Dickey Wednesday | pp 994-­‐1014: The Sounds of Poetry – “The Word Plum,” Helen Chasin / “What the Motorcycle Said,” Mona van Duyn / “Dirge,” Kenneth Fearing / “Metrical Feet,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge / “[There was a young girl from St. Paul],” Anonymous / From “The Charge of the Light Brigade,” Alfred, Lord Tennyson / “Song,” Sir John Suckling / “To the Memory of Mr. Oldham,” John Dryden / “The Raven,” Edgar Allan Poe / “[Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore],” William Shakespeare / “[A narrow Fellow in the Grass],” Emily Dickenson / “Mr. X,” Catherine Bowman Friday | pp 1016-­‐1023: Words and Music – “Dear John, Dear Coltrane,” Michael Harper / “Mr. Tambourine Man,” Bob Dylan / “123rd Street Rap,” Willie Perdomo Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, March 22 by midnight) Essay Proposal due by midnight, Friday, March 22. Week Twelve (March 25 – March 29): Internal Structure | External Form Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 1024-­‐1051: Internal Structure – “Mr. Flood’s Party,” Edwin Arlington Robinson / “Church Going,” Philip Larkin / “The Goose Fish,” Howard Nemerov / “Sonrisas,” Pat Mora / “The Victims,” Sharon Olds / “The Dance, “ William Carlos Williams / “Heaven,” Cathy Song / “Poetry,” Stephen Dunn / “Ode to the West Wind,” Percy Bysshe Shelley / “Deathfugue,” Paul Celan / Sample Writing Wednesday | pp 1052-­‐1082: External Form -­‐-­‐ “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night,” Dylan Thomas / “Poetry,” Marianne Moore / “Sestina,” Elizabeth Bishop / “Beware : do not read this poem,” Ishmael Reed / “Ars Poetica,” Archibald MacLeish / “Ballad of Birmingham,” Dudley Randall / “[My lady’s presence makes the roses red],” Henry Constable / “Nuns Fret Not,” William Wordsworth / “A Sonnet Is a Moment’s Monument,” Dante Gabriel Rossetti / “On the Sonnet,” John Keats / “On the Grasshopper and the Cricket,” John Keats / “The New Colossus,” Emma Lazarus / “Range-­‐Finding,” Robert Frost / “Design,” Robert Frost / “[When our two souls stand up],” Elizabeth Barrett Browning / “[What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why],” Edna St. Vincent Millay / “[I shall forget you presently, my

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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dear],” Edna St. Vincent Millay / “[My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun],” William Shakespeare / “Sonnet,” Billy Collins / “[l(a],” e.e. cummings / “[Buffalo Bill

‘s],” e.e. Cummings Friday | No new reading. Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, March 29 by midnight) Week Thirteen (April 1 – April 5): The Longer Work (Beowulf, Coleridge and Eliot) Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 1083-­‐1098: The Longer Work – from Beowulf, Anonymous Wednesday | pp 1098-­‐1114: The Longer Work – The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Samuel Taylor Coleridge Friday | pp 1115-­‐1124: The Longer Work – “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” T.S. Eliot / Sample Writing Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, April 5 by midnight) Exam 2 (Poetry): In class on Friday, April 5.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Unit 3: Drama Week Fourteen (April 8 – April 12): Drama (Reading, Responding, Writing) Reading Assignment: Monday | No new reading. Wednesday | No new reading. Friday | pp 1382-­‐1436: Drama (Reading, Responding, Writing) – Trifles, Susan Glaspell / The Real Inspector Hound, Tom Stoppard / Responding to Drama Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, April 12 by midnight) Week Fifteen (April 15 – April 19): Elements of Drama Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 1437-­‐1447; pp 2128-­‐2193 (out of sequence): Elements of Drama – Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller Wednesday | No new reading. Friday | No new reading. Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, April 19 by midnight) Essay due by midnight on Friday, April 19. Week Sixteen (April 22 – April 26): Tragedy and Comedy Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 1557-­‐1597: Tragedy and Comedy – Oedipus the King, Sophocles Wednesday | No new reading.

English 175-­‐02: Introduction to Literary Genres (Schab) Syllabus and Reading Schedule (Spring 2013)

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Friday | pp 1597-­‐1640: Tragedy and Comedy – The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, April 26 by midnight) Week Seventeen (April 29 – May 3): Shakespeare Reading Assignment: Monday | pp 1641-­‐1700: Shakespeare – A Midsummer Night’s Dream, William Shakespeare Wednesday | No new reading. Friday | No new reading. Required Tasks: Reading Journal (due Friday, May 3 by midnight) Week Eighteen (May 6 – May 10): Finals Week No reading assignment or journal this week. Class does not meet except for during our Final Exam Period, which is listed below. Required Tasks: Final Exam Period Exam 3 (Drama): In class on Monday, May 6, from 10:00 am – Noon.

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