Free Essay

Botswana Case

In: Business and Management

Submitted By brijesh09
Words 364
Pages 2
Rrhtrht thrhhtr
Thhtrhttr htsr htrhth hthkrngk hthth rwv r e q rt htrh trq4 45
Hvf kerfk rerejnk jbrkb jjk rejjr rno jjk jkrek jj
Hhjjds fewfefe ff f ejj w uhir hjr hhfds fe f grgr rge greg greg rggr45
Dhvvef fefef ew eew gr434 ty45i76 p; oi ewr we retrr 76 76 f d nkj ku lk l adwq
Hvjcsvj fewewf fgr h h hkj gtjt ti jjjj eruef ehffr ehfi jkif k gfi3 ii czbv cxi wwe uue wrere
Eerke rerejjh rer reu q rej gfh fg gju
Rrhtrht thrhhtr
Thhtrhttr htsr htrhth hthkrngk hthth rwv r e q rt htrh trq4 45
Hvf kerfk rerejnk jbrkb jjk rejjr rno jjk jkrek jj
Hhjjds fewfefe ff f ejj w uhir hjr hhfds fe f grgr rge greg greg rggr45
Dhvvef fefef ew eew gr434 ty45i76 p; oi ewr we retrr 76 76 f d nkj ku lk l adwq
Hvjcsvj fewewf fgr h h hkj gtjt ti jjjj eruef ehffr ehfi jkif k gfi3 ii czbv cxi wwe uue wrere
Eerke rerejjh rer reu q rej gfh fg gju
Rrhtrht thrhhtr
Thhtrhttr htsr htrhth hthkrngk hthth rwv r e q rt htrh trq4 45
Hvf kerfk rerejnk jbrkb jjk rejjr rno jjk jkrek jj
Hhjjds fewfefe ff f ejj w uhir hjr hhfds fe f grgr rge greg greg rggr45
Dhvvef fefef ew eew gr434 ty45i76 p; oi ewr we retrr 76 76 f d nkj ku lk l adwq
Hvjcsvj fewewf fgr h h hkj gtjt ti jjjj eruef ehffr ehfi jkif k gfi3 ii czbv cxi wwe uue wrere
Eerke rerejjh rer reu q rej gfh fg gju
Rrhtrht thrhhtr
Thhtrhttr htsr htrhth hthkrngk hthth rwv r e q rt htrh trq4 45
Hvf kerfk rerejnk jbrkb jjk rejjr rno jjk jkrek jj
Hhjjds fewfefe ff f ejj w uhir hjr hhfds fe f grgr rge greg greg rggr45
Dhvvef fefef ew eew gr434 ty45i76 p; oi ewr we retrr 76 76 f d nkj ku lk l adwq
Hvjcsvj fewewf fgr h h hkj gtjt ti jjjj eruef ehffr ehfi jkif k gfi3 ii czbv cxi wwe uue wrere
Eerke rerejjh rer reu q rej gfh fg gju

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Hbs Botswana Case

...Botswana: A Diamond in the Rough Botswana, a country in the south of the African continent, has a surprising success story. This is because this country is located in a continent which has a history of colonization, poverty, and diseases. Botswana created an increase in its' GDP from 25% of the world's gem-quality diamonds, which was operated by a joint venture between the Bostwanan government and De Beers, the South African mining giant, which essentially controlled the world diamond market. If an individual would examine the case of Botswana's story, he/she will agree that this is a success story. Botswana's economic growth has outplaced even the “Asian Tigers”. This group consists of Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, which are the best in economic growth in such a short period of time. This is something big. By one estimate, it has the fourth highest GDP in Africa, giving it a standard of living which countries such as Mexico or Turkey has right now. One of the biggest reasons that Botswana has experienced a success story was that they were not in the eyes of the big european colonization in the beginning of the 19th century. Many African countries were being colonized at that time, losing their resources and cultures. Botswana was not united back then, there were members of related African tribes which migrated to the area in the middle of the 18th century. Another reason for this success story is that Botswana did not get affected by the......

Words: 1063 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Exploring Leasing Market Opportunities in Botswana

...LEASING CASE EXPLORING LEASING MARKET OPPORTUNITIES IN BOTSWANA by TOOCHUKWU AGWUNCHA ( copyright Fortvivit Resources Limited 2008) This case has been inspired and motivated by further developments in the Leasing industry in Botswana, but does not describe the actual situations in the country. Botswana, lies directly above South Africa and has one of the highest Gross Domestic Product per Capita in Africa (at USD 6140 - 2006). Its proximity to Africa’s economic powerhouse gives it the investment confidence of corporate organisations in South Africa. Its 2006 population is 1.75 million (growing at just over 1.5% p.a.) with a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of about USD10.75 billion, a booming solid mineral industry (especially Diamond mining) and a focused government whose liberal policies have encouraged Foreign Direct Investments (FDI’s) mostly sourced from and generated through the influence of the strong and resilient South African economy. Three years ago, Botswana started operating a leasing law in the country. The regulator in the industry is the Leasing Commission of Botswana (LECOBOT), which is empowered to supervise the Leasing operations in the country. Some of its terms of reference and charge of responsibility include but are not limited to the following: 1. Promote the business of equipment leasing through its regulation of the market and according to the provisions of the leasing law. 2. Enable and encourage leasing companies to practice the......

Words: 2459 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Hiv and Aids in Botswana

...ECONOMICS IN BOTSWANA AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (ECO 463) | HIGH HIV/AIDS PREVALENCE RATE IS ADVERSELY AFFECTING PROSPECTS OF ECONOMIC GROWTHIN BOTSWANA.DISCUSS | TEAM LEADER: GABRIEL CHITULA 201101850CONTACT NUMBER:+267 71 430 952EMAIL ADDRESS:GABRIEL.C.JUNIOR@GMAILCOMOTHER GROUP MEMBERSTSHEGOFATSO L DIBUILE201200993NICOLA B MAKATI201105383 | | | | 11/16/2015 | TABLE OF CONTENT Table of content ………………………………………………………….. 1 Abstract…………………………………………………………………… 2 Introduction……………………………………………………………….. 3 Impacts of HIV on households……………………………………………. 4 Impact of HIV on Firms and Business………………………….. 6 Impact of HIV at Macroeconomic Level………………………… 7 Conclusion……………………………………………………… 10 Reference ……………………………………………………… 11 ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of how the high HIV/AIDS prevalence rate adversely affects the economic growth of Botswana. HIV/AIDS is a growing problem in Botswana as the country has the second highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the world. There are different sectors in the economy which can be affected by HIV/AIDS namely; the household, the firm and the macro economy. This paper will look at the various components affecting these sectors and explain what impact they have on Botswana s economy. INTRODUCTION In light of recent studies, that establish a direct correlation between health and development, it brings about the question of how much the epidemic of HIV and AIDS- which has been haunting the nation for...

Words: 3133 - Pages: 13

Free Essay

Khoisan

...indigenous people” (Hitchcock 2002). The Khoe and San are still not officially recognized and statistics does not show their presence in South Africa. The Khoisan are made up of five main groupings, namely San, Griqua, Nama, Koranna and the Cape Khoi. However there is no precise number of Khoisan people that currently live in South Africa (Hitchcock 2002). The Khoisan are not constitutionally recognized as Indigenous communities. “The current legal institutions continue to classify them as “Coloureds” just like the apartheid regime did” (Barnard 1992). The San people also called Bushmen, or Basarwa all considered pejorative to some degree are members of various indigenous hunter-gatherer peoples of Southern Africa, whose territory spans Botswana, Namibia, Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa (Barnard 1992). There is a significant linguistic difference between them. The definition for indigenous people is a broad one and is defined differently according to people and organizations, but generally “indigenous people are those that have historically belonged to a particular region or country, before its colonization or transformation into a nation state, and may have different often unique cultural, linguistic, traditional, and other characteristics to those of the dominant culture of that region or state” (Barnard 1992). Ancestral land...

Words: 2357 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Economics

...1. SOUTH AFRICA: NATIONALISATION AND THE MINING SECTOR As of late, the political atmosphere has been clouded with varying judgements on the great issue of whether South African mines should be nationalised or not. The camp in favour of nationalisation, Former President of ANC Youth League, Julius Malema echoes the words of the Freedom Charter in that “The National Wealth of our country… the mineral wealth beneath the soil, the banks and the monopoly industry shall be transferred to the ownership of the people as a whole”. The camp not in favour sees this vision in a different light. Nonetheless, this essay investigates the feasibility of nationalising the country’s mining sector from both a theoretical and empirical stand point. 2. WHERE IT’S ALL STARTED Nationalisation of mines has been called for in order to give back to the country as the government will have direct control over the sector. This, they believe, will present more employment opportunities, better working conditions for miners, a more efficient distribution of income and overall improvement in service delivery. Julius Malema (the main instigator behind the call for nationalisation), proposes that the state take a controlling share of 60% in all private mines, all which will be managed by a state owned mining firm (LeadershipOnline, n.d). According to Malema, nationalisation will achieve the following: ➢ Increase the State’s budget for social development objectives; ➢ Be a basis from which......

Words: 1316 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Public Administrator

...REPUBLIC OF BOTSWANA Public Administration Country Profile Division for Public Administration and Development Management (DPADM) Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) United Nations July 2004 All papers, statistics and materials contained in the Country Profiles express entirely the opinion of the mentioned authors. They should not, unless otherwise mentioned, be attributed to the Secretariat of the United Nations. The designations employed and the presentation of material on maps in the Country Profiles do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Table of Contents Table of Contents........................................................................................... 1 Botswana...................................................................................................... 2 1. General Information ................................................................................... 3 1.1 People.................................................................................................. 3 1.2 Economy .............................................................................................. 3 1.3 Public Spending ..................................................................................... 4 1.4 Public Sector......

Words: 6184 - Pages: 25

Premium Essay

Bots

...ECONOMICS IN BOTSWANA AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (ECO 463) | HIGH HIV/AIDS PREVALENCE RATE IS ADVERSELY AFFECTING PROSPECTS OF ECONOMIC GROWTHIN BOTSWANA.DISCUSS | TEAM LEADER: GABRIEL CHITULA 201101850CONTACT NUMBER:+267 71 430 952EMAIL ADDRESS:GABRIEL.C.JUNIOR@GMAILCOMOTHER GROUP MEMBERSTSHEGOFATSO L DIBUILE201200993NICOLA B MAKATI201105383 | | | | 11/16/2015 | TABLE OF CONTENT Table of content ………………………………………………………….. 1 Abstract…………………………………………………………………… 2 Introduction……………………………………………………………….. 3 Impacts of HIV on households……………………………………………. 4 Impact of HIV on Firms and Business………………………….. 6 Impact of HIV at Macroeconomic Level………………………… 7 Conclusion……………………………………………………… 10 Reference ……………………………………………………… 11 ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of how the high HIV/AIDS prevalence rate adversely affects the economic growth of Botswana. HIV/AIDS is a growing problem in Botswana as the country has the second highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the world. There are different sectors in the economy which can be affected by HIV/AIDS namely; the household, the firm and the macro economy. This paper will look at the various components affecting these sectors and explain what impact they have on Botswana s economy. INTRODUCTION In light of recent studies, that establish a direct correlation between health and development, it brings about the question of how much the epidemic of HIV and AIDS- which has been haunting the nation for...

Words: 3133 - Pages: 13

Free Essay

Lovers

...Activity 3.2: The case of organ removal without permission (case 2.17) considered from a Kantian perspective The trauma experienced by families who became aware that the organs of their dead children had been removed without their knowledge, let alone permission, raises a number of ethical issues. The following discussion ignores that a number of doctors acted deviously and deceitfully in falsifying records to keep their actions concealed from public gaze. Instead, the focus is upon the development of ethically-based rules of practice to govern the use of human organs. In this context, it is difficult, if not impossible, to construct a Kantian-based justification of the doctors’ actions. Employing the concept of universalisability, categorical imperatives such as, ‘doctors should always allow their professional interests to override patients’ (or relatives’) interests’, or ‘doctors should always deceive patients’ are clearly flawed at both an ethical and practical level. With respect to the former, such commands run counter to one of the formulations of the categorical imperative, i.e. the need to treat fellow human, beings as ends not means. In terms of the practical implications of such an imperative, if patients, or their relatives, knew that doctors could never be trusted the relationship between doctor and patient would become fraught and would be likely to seriously undermine medical treatments and research. This would clearly be against the interests......

Words: 1886 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

Zambia - My Land of Birth

...Zambia, my country of birth where I spent a significant part of my childhood, got its name from the Zambezi River, the largest river flowing into the Indian Ocean. It is a landlocked country located between the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Zimbabwe (Holmes & Wong, 2009, p. 7). Zambia’s population has been steadily increasing from 7.8 Million in 1990 (City Population Zambia, 2007) to 12.9 million in 2009 (US Department of State, 2009). At the forefront of Zambia’s economy is its ability to mine for great natural resources such as emeralds, aquamarines, amethyst and tourmalines (Dickovick, 2008, p. 320). It also produces 6% of the world’s copper, making it the fourth largest producing copper nation (Holmes & Wong, 2009, p. 44). Lusaka, the city I grew up in and the capital city of Zambia is one of the fastest growing cities in central Africa. Lusaka has changed dramatically from the time I left in 1990 to the time I visited it a few years ago. The changes in society, economic infrastructure and human condition have been dramatic. Zambia has changed so much over a span of 19 years. All the activities that I remember doing with my family and friends, such as safaris and picnics at the Kafue River, on the weekends and holidays have been closed. The zoo which used to be filled with amazing wildlife, which I frequently visited, does not exist anymore. All the animals which once resided there died or escaped because they were not fed properly or looked after...

Words: 1464 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

The San (“Bushmen”) People

...The San (“Bushmen”) People Luis M. Cruz ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Megan Douglass April 1, 2013 The Photograph Below is of the San ("Bushmen") People, they reside in the Kalahari Desert of Southwest Africa and are known as one of the best hunting and gathering communities in the modern world, (Marshall, J, 2011). [pic] Source: by John Marshall copyright 2011 Documentary Educational Resources The San people are a foraging tribe, they are traditionally a band society made up of families and relatives. Foraging bands such as the San survive by going where there is an abundance of food and water. They practice a gender based division of labor just like many other foraging bands, for the most part the women care for the children and search for suitable for eating vegetation, while the men hunt for the meat and provide other skills such as making tools like blowpipes, darts, and digging sticks. The San's people are hard workers and do what is needed to support the social order, but the San people are also a relaxed people who enjoy each other’s company and heavily rely on each other for the bands continued existence. Social ties are considered very important in this band society because no one person can simply be thinking of their own benefit over the groups. The San meals are an example of the communities methods, every bit of their food is gathered together......

Words: 1053 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Botswana

...30 November 2012 Environmental Issues in Botswana Botswana is an incredibly venerable in terms of this countries environmental problems. This country has been faced with major challenges to its environment in recent years due to climate change, population growth, increased resource consumption and overstocking making the ecosystems more vulnerable. This has caused Botswana to be susceptible to major environmental issues. I will discuss some of the major environment issues this country is currently facing today such desertification, water scarcity, and biodiversity. One major concern Botswana is facing is desertification problems that predominantly stem from the severe times of drought in the country. Due to the drought, 75% of the country’s human and animal populations are dependent on groundwater. Groundwater use has eased the effects of drought, but has left a toll on the land. Groundwater is retrieved through drilling deep boreholes, which leads to the erosion of the land. Surface water is very scarce in Botswana and less than 5% of the agriculture in the country is sustainable by rainfall. Due to this 95% of the country raises cattle and livestock as a means for an income. Therefore, it is not a surprise to see that 71% of the country’s land is used for communal grazing, which has been a major cause for the desertification of the country. Since raising livestock has proven to be profitable for the people of Botswana, the land is continuing to be exploited.......

Words: 726 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Discuss the Realtionship Between Strategic Planning and Strategic Management, and Indicate the Importance of the Latter in so Far as the Attainment of the Organisational Goal Is Concerned. Support Your Answer with

...discuss the Conversation opened. 1 read message. Skip to content Using Gmail with screen readers A faster way to get your GmailYes, get Chrome nowNo thanks × Kedumetse Google+ Profile Icon Search Gmail COMPOSE Labels Inbox (10,291) Starred Important Sent Mail Drafts (9) Circles Personal Receipts Travel Unwanted More CollapseHangouts ...

Words: 477 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Personal Reflection

...settled in their present settlements permanently. It is hoped that this might shed light on Babirwa people of present day Botswana. The region called Bobirwa is the area which lies between the Shashe River Tuli Block and a north-South line approximately 28 0 15 ' E. The area compasses the villages’ of Bobonong, Gobajango,Mabolwe, Lentswe-Ie-Moriti, Mathathane, Molaladau, Mothabaneng, Semolale and Tsetsebjwe Babirwa originated in Nareng which lies in the south of Bolobedi in Letswalo country around Phalaborwa. Babirwa people present at Nareng date back to between 1510 and 1599. Babirwa moved from Nareng under their chief, Tshukudu, to the Blauwberg area in the former Transvaal. It was while they were at Blauwberg that they started breaking up around the 1820s. The group that left Blauwberg headed for Zimbabwe under the leadership of Dauyatswala and his brother Makhure (a). This group was not welcomed in Mambo's country. The two brothers decided to leave the place to seek refuge somewhere else. At the last moment Makhure refused to go with Dauyatswala. Dauyatswala together with his followers moved back to the Transvaal. Makhure was given a piece of land in Zimbabwe to live with his followers. They lived for a while before they were attacked by the Ndebele of Mzilikazi, who was running away from Shaka's rule, in 1837 .They fled to the present day Botswana led by Sekoba, one of Makhure's sons. Sekoba was accompanied by his brothers Makala, Mbalane and Bolamba who in most......

Words: 1462 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Diamonds

...Until the beginning of the eighteenth century all known diamonds came from the Golconda region near Hyderabad in India. Pliny wrote an incredible account of how diamonds were found in an inaccessible valley. The locals threw meat into the valley and the diamonds stuck to it. Eagles carried off the meat to their nests from which the diamonds were recovered. At their peak the Golconda diamond fields probably supported many thousands of workers but were practically exhausted by the late seventeenth century. In 1844 diamonds were discovered in Brazil and for a while the Chapada Diamantina, or Diamond Highlands, in the state of Bahia, became the diamond capital of the world attracting prospectors and adventurers in the same way that the California Gold Rush did. A series of major diamond finds in South Africa from 1867 onwards, coinciding with a decline in production in Brazil, soon made it by far the biggest source of diamonds. As in Brazil and Indian the first finds were alluvial but by 1869 diamonds were being mined in South Africa. Their value depended on their rarity and Cecil Rhodes realised that if suppliers competed against each other that would be threatened. By the end of his short life Rhodes had gained control of the diamond mines and extended British rule over much of southern Africa. Mark Twain said of him that when he stands upon the Cape of Good Hope, his shadow falls to the Zambesi (Twain, 1904). One area that was not under British rule was South-West Africa...

Words: 380 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Scramble for Africa

...One of the major reasons for bad relations amongst the nations of Europe in the years before 1914 was that they were engaged in a struggle to obtain overseas colonies. Although this happened in several areas of the world, the most dramatic changes took place in Africa. Many nations took part in what became known as the “Scramble for Africa”. The following pages will show the territory gained by each nation, and will explain why the race to gain colonies played a part in the build-up of international tensions which eventually resulted in World War One. During the late 1800s, relations between Britain and France were strained by a series of disputes over African colonies. Both nations hoped to control Egypt and Morocco and this caused many bitter arguments. These were eventually settled in 1904 by the Entente Cordiale. This “friendly understanding” said that Britain should control Egypt and France should control Morocco. However, Germany strongly objected to this agreement… Kaiser William II was jealous of the empires of both France and Britain and tried to break up the “friendly understanding” between them. On two occasions, in 1905 and 1911, German claims over Morocco raised international tension. Indeed, the “Agadir Incident” of 1911 caused Britain to hint that war might result if Germany continued her claims. This crisis passed, but these disputes simply made international relations worse. The bad feeling they created (combined with other factors) made the......

Words: 596 - Pages: 3