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Bp Oil Spil

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Submitted By Biscuit1174
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Ethics in the Workplace Case Study: BP Oil Spill
On April 20, 2010 off the Gulf of Mexico, there was a blowout of the Macondo well which is owned by British Petroleum also known as BP. When the blowout took place it got immediate media attention because aspects of the event were known over the world. Within events transpiring it was discovered how limited the resources and reaction to the disaster was going to be. This paper will detail aspects of the event from symptoms of the problem, the root cause, important unresolved issues, roles of the organization’s key players and stakeholders, and explain the focus of specific ethical systems. Also discussed in this paper are relevant strategies and alternatives, the effect of globalization on the choice of preferred alternatives, the most valid alternative and resolution recommendations, and an example of a successful implementation of the solution.
Symptoms of the Problem
Natural disasters or any disaster of any kind is hard to manage just for the purpose that these is no real planning for the situation and there is no real way to say who is in charge when a disaster happens. Concerning the oil spill with British Petroleum (BP) symptoms for the situation was that there was a delayed response, the impact on the environment and the citizens, federal regulations were lax, and the recovery efforts were not adequate. According to Griggs (2011), OPA 90 is a federal statute that holds all the responsible parties in containment, clean-up, and damages that result from the situation. With the symptoms that were presented their needed to be a clear understanding of what should to transpire in accordance with federal laws in the efforts to minimize the damage.
The Root Cause of the Dilemma
April 20 explosion of BP's Deepwater Horizon oilrig created a negative situation for the company. Oil leaks from the rig caused the oil...

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