British Airways Case Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mehakyounus
Words 2142
Pages 9
British Airways Case Study
[Name of the writer]
[Name of the institution]

Table of Contents
Abstract iii
Introduction 1
1.1 HR strategies for an organisation 1
1.2 Assessment of HR strategies and its application 1
British Airways HR strategies 2
2.1 Contemporary issues affecting SHRM 4
2.2 Analysis of contemporary issues affecting SHRM 5
Impact of the merger on SHRM at British Airways 5
Conclusion 6
References 7

Abstract
This report is based on the employee relations at British Airways (BA). It includes four main HR strategies which are applicable to British Airways for resolving employee relation issue. Moreover, other HR strategies are also highlighted which are used in the organization. Moreover, merger of BA with Iberia is also discussed and its impact on strategic HRM.

Introduction
Employee relations with employer have been remained a biggest challenge to British Airways. Due to outsourcing and cost cutting business strategy, BA experienced industrial disputes. Employees go on strikes. It hits the passengers during the peak seasons of New Year or Christmas. Employee relation is a biggest issue. BA employs a diversified workforce, therefore, disputes between employees and employer occurs frequently. There are some HR strategies that are applicable to BA for strengthening relation between employees and employer.
1.1 HR strategies for an organisation
There are various HR strategies designed for organization to attract and retain the employees. These strategies are rewarding, learning and development, engaging employees, training, managing high performance, and managing employee relations. It is observed that human resource management department must bring new and strong ideas in order to encourage their employees and retain them. It is noticed that if acknowledgment is not given then employees get de-motivated, disappointed…...

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