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British Short Fictions

In: English and Literature

Submitted By justgkp
Words 98420
Pages 394
BRITISH SHORT FICTION IN THE
EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

This page intentionally left blank

British Short Fiction in the
Early Nineteenth Century
The Rise of the Tale

TIM KILLICK
Cardiff University, UK

© Tim Killick 2008
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publisher.
Tim Killick has asserted his moral right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, to be identified as the author of this work.
Published by
Ashgate Publishing Limited
Gower House
Croft Road
Aldershot
Hampshire GU11 3HR
England

Ashgate Publishing Company
Suite 420
101 Cherry Street
Burlington, VT 05401-4405
USA

www.ashgate.com
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
Killick, Tim
British short fiction in the early nineteenth century : the rise of the tale
1. Short stories, English – History and criticism 2. English fiction – 19th century – History and criticism 3. Short story 4. Literary form – History – 19th century
I. Title
823’.0109
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Killick, Tim.
British short fiction in the early nineteenth century : the rise of the tale / by Tim Killick.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-7546-6413-0 (alk. paper)
1. Short stories, English—History and criticism. 2. English fiction—19th century—History and criticism. 3. Short story. 4. Literary form—History—19th century. I. Title.
PR829.K56 2008
823’.0109--dc22
2007052226
ISBN: 978-0-7546-6413-0

Contents
Acknowledgements

vi

Introduction

1

1

Overview: Short Fiction in the Early Nineteenth Century
Part I: Criticism, History, and Definitions
Part II: Short Fiction in the Periodical Press

5
5
22

2...

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