Premium Essay

Brown vs. Board of Education

In: Social Issues

Submitted By trukerzgal
Words 2475
Pages 10
Nicole Cummings
POSU 343
Signature Assignment
October 16, 2014
Brown vs. Board of Education The court case docketed Brown vs. Board of education was a culmination of several individuals seeking constitutional justice for their civil liberties. These brave individuals changed the course of history. This landmark case changed racial segregation in schools and allowed equal education to all regardless of race. Although the Declaration of Independence declared that all men were created equal, it wasn’t for many years after the ending of slavery that equal rights were strengthened and the effects of slavery were abolished. Amendments to the constitution were put into effect to equal out the balance of the laws due to racial segregation, but despite these amendments African-Americans were rarely given the equal treatment as their white counterparts. Many states, especially in the south, made segregation a legal practice. What became known as Jim Crow Laws, were regulations that enabled separate bathrooms, busses, and schools simply based on the color of their skin.
Many people disagreed with these unjust laws, but only few made their opinion known in court. One of the first cases to be heard regarding unmerited segregation was brought to the Supreme Court by a gentleman by the name of Homer Plessy. Mr. Plessy refused to give up his seat on the train to a white man and was therefore arrested. He knew that this arrest violated the 14th amendments “equal protection clause”. In 1892 he decided to fight this in court and it eventually made it all the way to the Supreme Court by 1896. The case became known as Plessy vs. Ferguson and ruled against Plessy in a vote of 8 to 1. Justice Harlan became known as the lone insurgent and his dissenting statement became known as the rally cry for later generations who also deemed segregation unconstitutional. Justice John...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Brown vs. Board of Education

...Name Professor Course Date Brown vs. Board of Education The Brown vs. Board of Education case was a colossal influence on desegregation of schools in the United States of America. It created a milestone of equal opportunities in schools among the blacks and whites. The ruling of this case took place in 1954 and it ruled in favor of Mr. Brown. It is among one of the important cases ever heard on racial prejudice in the American history. The Brown vs. Board of Education case is about a young third grader girl in Kansas, Topeka city named Linda Brown (Dudley 48). Linda was subjected to trekking one mile through a railway switchyard daily in order to reach her black elementary school despite there being a white school seven blocks away from her home. Browns father attempted to find a chance in the white school to get her enrolled there since the black elementary school was far from home but the principal of the white school rejected Linda’s enrollment because she was black and the school was a white school. Mr. Brown and other parents reported the incident to the head of Topeka’s National Association for Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The head of NAACP Mr. McKinley Burnett had really waited for such an opportunity so as to challenge racial segregation problem in court as segregation cases were very rampant in the United States schools. This was the right opportunity as Mr. Burnett and NAACP took legal action by taking the case to the District court....

Words: 1494 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Brown vs Board of Education

...Brown v. Board of Education The case of brown v. board of education was one of the biggest turning points for African Americans to becoming accepted into white society at the time. Brown vs. Board of education to this day remains one of, if not the most important cases that African Americans have brought to the surface for the better of the United States. Brown v. Board of Education was not simply about children and education (Silent Covenants pg 11); it was about being equal in a society that claims African Americans were treated equal, when in fact they were definitely not. This case was the starting point for many Americans to realize that separate but equal did not work. The separate but equal label did not make sense either, the circumstances were clearly not separate but equal. Brown v. Board of Education brought this out, this case was the reason that blacks and whites no longer have separate restrooms and water fountains, this was the case that truly destroyed the saying separate but equal, Brown vs. Board of education truly made everyone equal. The case started in Topeka, Kansas, a black third-grader named Linda Brown had to walk one mile through a railroad switchyard to get to her black elementary school, even though a white elementary school was only seven blocks away. Linda's father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in the white elementary school seven blocks from her house, but the principal of the school refused simply because the child was black....

Words: 1236 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Brown vs. Board of Education

...BROWN VS. BOARD OF EDUCATION OF TOPEKA The Brown vs. Board of Education ruling was a colossal influence on desegregation of schools and a landmark in the movement for equal opportunity between the blacks and whites that continues to this day. The Brown vs. Board of Education case was not the first of its kind. Ever since the early 1950s, there were five separate cases that were filed, dealing with the desegregation of schools. In all but one of these cases, the schools for whites were of better quality than the schools for the blacks. The African-Americans argued that this situation was unjust and unconstitutional1. Education has been long regarded as a valuable asset for all of America's adolescence. However, when this benefit is deprived of to a specific group, measures must be taken to defend its educational right. In the 1950's, a courageous group of activists launched a legal attack on segregation in schools. The one who headed this attack was NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall. We find that his legal strategies would contribute wholly to the closure of educational segregation. After the Civil War ended in 1865, Congress passed the 14th amendment that stated that all people born in the United States are considered citizens. The 14th amendment also proclaims that individual states cannot make any laws to take away a person's right to life, liberty, or property....

Words: 1328 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Brown vs. Board of Education

...Brown v. Board of Education Brown v. Board of education case took place in 1954. It is one of the most important cases in the American history of racial prejudice. The U.S. Supreme Court recognized separate schools for blacks and whites unconstitutional. This decision became an important event of struggle against racial segregation in the United States. The Brown case proved that there is no way a separation on the base of race to be in a democratic society. Brown v. Board of education is not a case just about education and children, it is a case of everybody being equal. Brown v. Board of Education was a beginning for American people to understand that separate but equal is not the same. The Brown case revealed this. It was the reason why blacks and whites do not have separate accomodations any more. Separate and equal does not exist any more, Brown v. Board of eduacation made everyone equal. The first case in which African American challenged the doctrine of separate but equal in the United States public education system was in Boston Massachusetts in 1849. Prior to Brown v. Board (1954), from 1881 to 1949 there were eleven cases initiated to try an integrate schools in Kansas. The schools that the African American children attended were not equal to their white counterparts. Most of the time the African American students had to travel farther than white students to get to their schools....

Words: 2495 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Brown vs. Board of Education

...Board of Education, a brief history of the major case that had to be overturned to achieve the desired goal of Brown v. Board of Education. After the Civil War, America, especially the South was plunged into a racist spurred segregation. The South had lost the Civil War, but they were not ready to let African Americans simply assimilate into polite society because the President said they had to. Directly after the Civil...

Words: 2256 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

The Equal Protection Clause

...Lum vs. Rice (1927) was a Supreme Court case where the Mississippi education board did not allow a nine year old girl to attend the all-white Rosedale Consolidated School because of her ethnicity. Gong Lum’s daughter, Martha Lum, was Chinese and a native-born in the United States. One day, a superintendent at Rosedale told Martha to leave school because she was not Caucasian. Gong Lum later filed for suit and the state trial court was in his favor. The state took the issue to officials to readmit Martha Lum, however, the Supreme Court opposed the state’s decision. The Supreme Court supported their argument from the Cumming vs. Richmond County Board of Education case (1899) where it showed that schools are allowed to be separated for white and “colored” students. They also focused on whether or not Martha Lum was being denied of her equal protection of the laws from the 14th Amendment. This brought the Supreme Court to uphold the Plessy vs. Ferguson case (1896) by approaching the concept “separate but equal.” They declared that Martha Lum was not white and the Board of Trustees was allowed to exclude her from Rosedale. In 1954, the Brown family went against the Board of Education because they believed segregated schools can never be equal despite their similar...

Words: 794 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Hdfhf

...monroe55 English 11B 5/14/2015 Brown vs. Board of Education Influence Civil War Not many years ago, children of all ages and different race were permitted from going to the same school together along with many other places in to United States. Districts were able to legally separate students by the color of there skin. According to the law as of now had being set into place, they said these schools had to be equal. However, back then majority of schools for the black race were looked at as “nothing” or have “lesser value” than schools with white students. In addition, what were some effects on people of color and factors that were lead to bring down segregation? Meanwhile as many historical events were passing by such as past Slavery and Wars ending. Many people question the fact of why African Americans freedom was not fully set free. The freedom was set from slavery but much more was only waiting for them. This being called segregation, from having to sit separate on the bus, drink from different water fountains that where not only labeled for “Blacks and Whites”. These things were so crucial for people of color to deal with. It was like they over came something big only to be thrown another big people against them only because of there skin tone....

Words: 693 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Jim Crow Laes

...Jim Crow Laws   The Jim Crow Laws were based on a popular character who was dressed as an old,  decrepit, black man.  The laws were created to keep white and black people separated. In ​ To Kill  A Mockingbird, ​ white and black people lived separately, but they still interacted with each other.  Even though they weren’t exactly segregated, many people didn’t approve of the blacks  interacting with them.    In the 1870’s a law passed that required the segregation of black and white people in  transportation (“J​ im Crow Law | United States [1877­1954]”). In 1892, Homer Plessy, a  light­skinned creole of color was kicked off for sitting in the white section on a train. Homer  had light skin, but in the eyes of the government he was black. He refused to get up and go to  the black section on the train. The court ruled the law as constitutional, this opened up the  way to even more segregation laws. These laws are known as the Jim Crow Laws.   During the Jim Crow era, it was illegal for a white man to marry a black woman, or for a  white woman to marry a black man (“Jim Crow Laws”​......

Words: 1023 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

History

...This is because of the court case named Brown vs The Board of Education. Carrying on, when the nine black students were entering the school, or trying to enter the school, the white people had created a very large mob and insulted, spat on and harassed the students. Even the schools security guard was not letting the nine students enter. Due to this president Eisenhower sent in 1000 paratroopers to protect the students while going inside the school. This showed that the president was very determined to stop segregation in America. Moreover In my opinion I believe that the events of Little Rock were not the most significant event towards the civil rights campaign. In this piece of writing I will be talking about how: Brown vs The Board of Education; the role of the presidents; Martin Luther King and the Montgomery bus boycotts were all more important in my opinion than the events of Little Rock. In my opinion I believe that the court case ‘Brown vs The Board of Education’ is more vital over the events of Little Rock for many reasons. One very major reason to why I believe ‘Brown vs The Board of Education’ is more significant Is because if Linda Browns case was not taken to court and showed how she trekked to a very far ‘black...

Words: 1896 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Questioning Authority

...It has always been the authorities – the political, the religious, and the education authorities – that have attempted to comfort us by administering order, rules, and regulations; in effect they have successfully transferred their view of reality into our minds. It is important to question the decisions and ideas of authority, to support this argument one can look into specific historical figures and events. Galileo, Fleming, and the Supreme Court case Brown v Board of Education all exemplify the importance of questioning authority. The famous scientific figure Galileo reflects the importance of questioning authority. In 1616, Galileo was forbidden from holding or defending his belief that the Earth revolved around the sun. The Catholic Church, who believed that the Earth was the immovable center of the universe, deemed his belief heretical. After reading Galileo’s published work, scientists were agog at the possibilities brought on by his ideas. In 1633, the Roman Catholic Church forced Galileo to stand trial for his ideas. He had to publically denounce all of his ideas, and then he was convicted of heresy and sentenced to life imprisonment. The rest of his life was spent under house arrest, until his death in 1642. If the conviction of Galileo were never further questioned, science would have suffered an unbearable loss. The questioning of authority is evident in many of modern science’s greatest achievements....

Words: 510 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Brown vs Board of Ed

...Many articles have been written on the case of Brown vs. Board of Education since it occurred, and many opinions have been brought to the public's attention. The opinions of the African American authors seem to be slightly different than the white author. The language that the black authors use is slightly more hostile and a little more worried about America's integration of schools even thirty years after this...

Words: 1322 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Civil Rights

...Civil Rights The struggle for equality has been a battle fought for hundreds of years amongst Native Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. When we hear the words civil rights often we conjure images of Martin Luther King Jr. delivering his soul-stirring “I Have a Dream” speech before the nation’s capital. The truth is, minorities have been fighting for their civil rights way before the 1950’s in fact it dates way back to the early 1880’s when Native Americans lost their lands, family, culture but most importantly their rights as human beings. America deprived Native Americans of their rights and ways of living by recruiting the young children to try and stop them from growing up to become “savages,” as the USA described them and instead civilize them and turn them into men of class. The USA though they were doing the Native Americans a favor by civilizing them when instead all they were doing was destroying the most valuable thing a man has in this world which is his family. If being taken away from your family wasn’t bad enough students at federal boarding schools were forbidden to express their culture, everything from wearing long hair to speaking even a single Indian word. They lost not only their language, but also their American Indian name. In my opinion I don’t see how the USA was doing Native Americans a favor by the intent to completely transform people, inside and out, language, religion, family structure, economics, the way you make a......

Words: 965 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Shapers of American Education

...Key Shapers of the American Education System Jennifer Milam Grand Canyon University: UNV 576 Wednesday September 6, 2012 Key Shapers of the American Education System The historical events that have shaped America and contribute to all that is quintessentially “American” can also be seen in the evolution of our country’s education system. There are many key contributors and events in history that have led up to the education system and the challenges and triumphs that we see today in schools all across America. The most significant theme that runs throughout the evolution of our modern education system is the evolvement of attitudes and philosophies that were at times controversial, but without which, the school system we know today would cease to exist. There are four notable shapers to this evolution of attitudes: John Calvin (1509), John Dewey (1916), Brown vs. the Board of Education (1954), and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA) of 2002. These four shapers mark clear delineations in the purposes and attitudes that have shaped our education system at distinct fork in the roads along the path to today’s school experience in America. John Calvin John Calvin was the leading face and voice of the protestant reformation movement. He, along with Martin Luther of the Lutheran reformation, believed that states should sponsor schools and that the general public deserves to have access to schools....

Words: 1212 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Brown V. Board of Ed

...Brown V Board Of Education May 17, 1954 was a date that had an impact on the board of education and our lives. There was an African American girl named Linda Brown, she was a normal girl in the third grade. Linda went to a school that was a mile away even though there was an all white elementary school, seven blocks away. Her father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in the white elementary school, but the principal of the school refused to let her in due to her race. Mr. Brown then took this problem to the NAACP ( National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), they agreed to help him. As this case became more known it was then later brought up to supreme court. Other cases have led up to this case, these cases included, Sweat v. Painter (1950) and McLaurin v. Oklahoma Board of Regents of Higher Education (1950). The cases leading up to Brown Vs Board of Education featured African American people dealing with segregation problems. Brown argued segregation is seen as antithetical to our whole culture. If a particular class of people are forced to stay in their own neighborhoods, have their own schools, parks, stores, restaurants, movie theaters, and not welcome in 'mainstream' places, they are not equal as citizens. This is a violation of the 'equality' provisions of the 14th amendment....

Words: 494 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

History

...Its mission is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination; To promote equality of rights and to eradicate caste or race prejudice among the citizens of the United States; to advance the interest of coloured citizens; to secure for them impartial suffrage; and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts, education for the children, employment according to their ability and complete equality before law. Racial segregation is separation of humans into racial groups in daily life. It may apply to activities such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a public toilet, attending school, and going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. The black American people was segregated and this was mostly because they felt that black people was more inferior to the white people. The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) was a racist anti-Semitic movement; at first the Ku Klux Klan focused its anger and violence on African-Americans, on white Americans who stood up for them, and against the federal government which supported their rights. Subsequent incarnations of the Klan, which typically emerged in times of rapid social change, added more categories to its enemies list, including Jews, Catholics, homosexuals, and different groups of immigrants. Many Ku Klux Klan groups have attempted to take advantage of that fear and uncertainty, using...

Words: 1279 - Pages: 6