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Business Ethics Film Paper

In: Business and Management

Submitted By apackett
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Business Ethics
Edge of Darkness
Sept 7, 2014

The film the Edge of Darkness is about police homicide detective Thomas Craven, who picks up his daughter Emma at the Boston station, as she is coming home for a visit. While Emma is getting into the car before heading home she starts to vomit. While they are at home and Craven is preparing them dinner, Emma’s nose starts to bleed, she vomits again, and becomes worried. Emma starts telling her father that she needs to go see a doctor right away, and she needs to tell Craven something. On their way out the front door to go to the hospital, a gunman, fires and hits Emma and she passes away in her father’s arms. Craven first appear to have been the target, however, the more he learns and uncovers it starts to lead him to rethink that. He learns that his daughter led a life that not too many people knew about that lead to her murder. He also uncovers a corporate cover-up and government conspiracy, that Emma became aware of that Northmoor was manufacturing nuclear weapons. After Craven started uncovering more and more evidence and revealing that they know almost everything that happened, the head of Northmoor orders Craven to be poisoned just as his daughter Emma was. Craven is now very ill and goes to Bennett’s house, who is the head of Northmoor, he kills one of the people at Bennett’s house who Craven comes to realize he is the man that shot his daughter. Bennett tries to kill Craven by shooting him, which ends up wounding him, Craven is able to get a hold of Bennett and forces Bennett to drink the positioned milk. Bennett tries to go get the pills to counteract the poison, however, Craven is able to shoot and kill Bennett. Craven ends up dying from his wounds and poisoning. In the meantime the man that was working with him, the senator and Bennett ended the issues of the company’s incident without letting all the negativity out. In the end, all of the operatives involved in the corporate cover up are murdered and Craven can die knowing all is okay. The Edge of Darkness has several ethical issues presented throughout the film, corporate cover up, unethical behavior, whistleblowing, value conflicts, conflicts of interest and vicarious liability. The plot of this film really is showing how the company was covering up making dirty bombs. They would go to any means necessary to cover up what the company was doing that was wrong including breaking the law, even harming or murdering people. This goes hand in hand with the unethical behaviors. Northmoor even had a senator involved in the cover up and companies unethical behaviors. The unethical behaviors ranged from destroying evidence, coming up with well thought out lies to cover up what was going on within the company, breaking of several laws, harming others, even murder. Anyone that showed to be a threat to the company’s secrets would be eliminated by any means necessary. It is never right to cover up unethical behaviors, no matter the size or severity, especially when people are in danger or harmed.
While yes, it is sad to say that there are many companies that cover things up this is where we really need to rely on those that are considered whistleblowers. Whistleblowers are employees that bring unethical corporate misconduct to others attention once it is discovered. There are different forms of whistleblowing internal and external. Emma, Craven’s daughter was a whistleblower, using external whistleblowing, she tried to bring what she discovered too many people’s attention, even a lawyer and senator, all who were involved in the company’s unethical behaviors. While whistleblowing is a good thing, it can be dangerous depending on how dirty the company is willing to be to cover it up.
The film also showed value conflicts, which are conflicts that impact a person’s values and test how strong those values. Things such as lying, stealing, harming of others or even murder all which are against the law and against more peoples values. This film shows how when it comes to certain things, even the most loyal and dedicated person can have these conflicts and cross to the other side. Craven who was a loyal and highly respected homicide detective had several times where he had conflicts of values, while trying to uncover the truth in regards to his daughter’s murder. Craven was doing the right thing in his mind to make sure the truth got out and no one else was harmed. He also had conflict of interest in investigating his daughter’s murder being a homicide detective and going above what should be done to solve or uncover a case.
Edge of Darkness also showed forms of vicarious liability, which is even if someone is not involved in an issue or incident actively they can still be held responsible for what happened. Example being the senator he wasn’t directly involved in the murders and some of the other unethical behaviors in the end if it would have been discovered and gone to the courts he would have been held responsible for what was and what did happen. As he knew about it and just let it happen. This also would go for the lawyer involved on covering up what was happening that he knew about instead of reporting it.
The film Edge of Darkness was a great film that kept you intrigued the whole way through, it is a film I would definitely recommend to others. This is a thriller crime film, it does contain a lot of violence. The plot includes conspiracies and ethical issues and choices. Many people have conspiracy theories over corporate and government cover ups and this film places to those thoughts. Northmoor, the big corporation is building dirty bombs that can’t be traced back to the U.S., they have an attorney and a state senator involved in the cover up. This really make you think how much like this is really going on out there. While maybe not to this scale, however, how many corporations are making unethical decisions and covering them up.
Another thing this film makes you think about is politics you here too often about government cover ups or being involved in unethical decisions. This film shows how just a few “wrong” choices can get out of hand. In the end, the truth comes out, we just hope it is before there is a lot of harm to people. This film also can make you think about who can we really trust? If not our friends, co-workers, politicians or executives then who? Many of the people that Craven thought he could trust in the end turned on him.
This film wasn’t biased in my opinion, it covers a lot of different angles and views. We all hope that people that have information of unethical behaviors will come forward and try to shed light on what’s going on. Being a whistleblower can come with risks though, which this film shows. While it most likely be to this extent, it shows that there are risks even when you are doing the right thing. You need to make sure you are doing the right thing even if there are risks involved.

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