Free Essay

Canadian Identity

In: Historical Events

Submitted By glydia
Words 819
Pages 4
Democracy is a form of government or accord by society characterized by formal equality of rights and privileges. Canada exhibits a democratic government that protects the interests and demands of minority groups, who are free from discrimination and their rights and privileges are valued equally to those of the majority. Through political, human and cilvil rights, social well-fare systems, and international relations, Canada has formed a strong governmental institution that fosters an inclusive democracy. Between 1945-2014, the Canadian identity transitioned to an inclusive democratic society defined by domestic social reforms and international commitments to the global community

In the last seventy years, Canada developed lawful political, human and civil rights within the nation and in the global community. In May of 1945, representatives of 50 countries met in San Francisco at the United Nations Conference on International Organizations, to draw up the United Nations Charter. Canada participated in the San Francisco conferences as a founding member of the Unite Nations. The Charter strived for collective security to avoid war, to develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international co-operation in solving international problems and promoting and encouraging respect for human and civil rights. Canada’s participation in the United Nations was instrumental in a global reputation of humanitarian contributions. Canada’s dedication to fundamental human rights internationally, upheld Canadian core democratic values. Canada’s federal government crafted a new Canadian Constitution that domestically improved the civil rights of every citizen. Authorized in 1982, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms guaranteed the rights of individuals by enshrining those rights and certain limits on them in the highest form of government. The Charter created a social and legal revolution in Canada; expanding the rights of minorities, and transforming the nature of criminal investigations and prosecutions. The Charter legitimized the identity of every citizen and strived for equality among all Canadians. Minorities that were previously marginalized by the predominate Canadian culture were included by the charter, as the constitution dissolved the division of ethnic, social and political groups. Canada’s involvement in the United Nations, and implementation of a new constitution amounted to an inclusive democratic identity. This all encompassing identity was recognized within the nation, and globally.

Canada implemented social welfare systems that unified the nation, and defined it as a social democratic state. In 1965, Lester B. Pearson introduced the Canadian Pension Plan and Student loans. The pension plan was created to financially support retiring Canadians. CPP is an earnings related public pension that transfers income from workers to the retired. Later in 1965, the Pearson government offered student loans for Canadian’s who could not afford to go to University. Pearson invested in the younger generation, Canada’s future. Education was extended to all Canadians, not just the wealthy, and in turn, Canada would come to be a more educated nation. Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson believed that the state had a role to play in ensuring social security and equality in education. In 1966, the federal government introduced the "Medical Care Act," which insured health services such as hospital service, physician services and surgical-dental services. This act was later implemented in 1968, making universal health care a reality for all Canadians.Pearson brought the nation together by extending social welfare throughout the country. The state was now investing taxpayers dollars into well fair programs. CPP, Student loans, and Medi Care transitioned and strengthened the Canadian democratic institution and identity by investing in Canadian citizens.

Canada’s peacekeeping efforts created a nationalistic identity for Canadians, by humanitarian and democratic values. Under the United Nations, Canada undertook leading roles in peace missions in the Rwandan genocide from 1993 to 1996. The Canadian forces could not prevent the worst of the horrific violences between the Hutus and Tutsis, but did remain in the country to help the country by clearing mines and refugee resettlement before leaving the devastated country in 1996. At times, more than 400 Canadian soldiers would find themselves in the midst of some of the worst violence that could be imagined while taking part in international peace efforts to try to bring some stability to the embattled African nation. In 2001 after 9/11, the Canadian Government sent Canadian troops to Afghanistan. The Canadian troops in Afghanistan to defended Canada’s national safety, by battling terrorism and ensured Canadian leadership in a world affair. Canadian peacekeeping role also aimed to rebuild Afghanistan’s democracy, and livelihood. These peacekeeping initiatives proved the Canadian identity as an inclusive democratic society, conscious of the peace, safety and governmental success throughout all nations.

Between 1945-2014, the Canadian identity was defined by domestic social developments and international involvements in the global community which form an inclusive democratic nation. These defining characteristics of the Canadian identity were developed through political, social and civil right advancements, social welfare system’s growing, and international relations. Canada enshrined key democratic values throughout the nation, and reflected these principles in their global relations.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Canadian Identity

...Canadian identity refers to the unique culture, characteristics and condition of being Canadian, as well as the many symbols and expressions that set Canada and Canadians apart from other peoples and cultures of the world. Primary influences on the Canadian identity trace back to the arrival, beginning in the early seventeenth century, of French settlers to Acadia and the St. Lawrence River Valley, English settlers to Newfoundland, the British conquest of New France in 1759, and the ensuing dominance of French and British culture in the gradual development of both an imperial and a national identity. Throughout the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, First Nations played a critical part in the development of European colonies in Canada, from their role in assisting exploration of the continent, the fur trade and inter-European power struggles to the creation of the Métis people. Carrying through the 20th century and to the present day, Canadian aboriginal art and culture continues to exert a marked influence on Canadian identity. The question of Canadian identity was traditionally dominated by three fundamental themes: first, the often conflicted relations between English Canadians and French Canadians stemming from the French Canadian imperative for cultural and linguistic survival; secondly, the generally close ties between English Canadians and the British Empire, resulting in a gradual political process towards complete independence from the imperial power, and, finally...

Words: 407 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

The Canadian Identity

...ARSALAN ANEES HISTORY 30 IB PERIOD 5 MR. RADCHENKO SEPTEMBER 2012 “THE CANADIAN IDENTITY” The Canadian Identity The Canadian identity is composed of characteristics which define a Canadian and consequently Canada’s national structure. Canada is a strong independent country with a wide range of different ethnic backgrounds who stand united under the values of peace and prosperity. Over the course of history, the Canadian identity has maturely shaped into a unique character promoting elite and law abiding citizens. It has made vital contributions to the North American identity as a more multicultural and disciplined society. Canada has also been successful in building upon this identity closely tied to prominent figures displaying high reputations. The Canadian identity is a set of unique characteristics which are centered on all Canadians who value peace, unity, multiculturalism and take pride in their countries achievements in embracing various number of distinct people into themselves under one law and government. The Canadian identity’s background consists of the Aboriginal, British and French who helped to create an independent Canada and a unique identity which values freedom, peace and prosperity. Canada has the image of a strong and free country. The name “Canada” comes from an aboriginal word meaning “village”. There has been three main founders of this country we call Canada today, namely the Aboriginal, British and French. The aboriginal were believed...

Words: 1087 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Summarization Of Canadian Identity

...even though it has only been a short time for Canada’s existence. Canadian Identity can be analyzed in two different ways. One way of analyzing Canadian identity is to study our image that we project into the world. Identity can also be analyzed by studying how other locations see Canada as a country. Canada has been recognized by most places around the world as a peacekeeping and multiculturist nation. To Canadians, the world revolves around Canada and its peaceful endeavours. Canadian identity directly refers to unique culture, conditions and characteristics of being a Canadian, as well as many other different symbols and expressions that set Canadian...

Words: 962 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Essay On Canadian Identity

...What is your understanding of a Canadian Identity? When you first entered Canada and now, has it changed? Canadian Identity is someone that can be identified as a Canadian. To be a Canadian there are different ways that you could identify yourself as a Canadian whether as an immigrant who became a citizen or Canadian born. Before I came in here I was expected to be a citizen as I was a “highly skilled worker” and entered here with my Public Relations, and came knowing already that Canada was the best place to live in the world, not America. I came with high expectations and with the mindset of living a better life which of course we are all living now. So in a recall, identity gives you the rights as a citizen and causes national pride for...

Words: 1046 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

House on Mango Street

...Sandra Cisneros exposes the life of the main character, Esperanza, for one year as she struggles with trying to find her place in America as a Chicana young girl while also coming of age. The novel starts the day Esperanza and her family of six move into a house on Mango Street, and immediately she expresses her antipathy for not only the house, but also for the area in which they move into and the people around who judge them because of their ethnicity. The story is not told in the traditional format of a continuous story divided into chapters, but rather Cisneros uses forty-four vignettes to allow for the reader to fully understand why Esperanza has the struggles that she has. Along with Cisneros’ illustrating Esperanza’s looking for her identity through images of Esperanza’s thoughts and female obedience, symbolism of violence, legs, the Statue for Liberty, and Nenny, and diction of Spanish words, not using quotation marks, and a maturing tone, she also uses these them to permeate Esperanza’s desperation to leave Mango Street throughout the whole novel. Cisneros’ use of vignettes highlights important moments in Esperanza’s life that emphasize how she develops over the course of a year. Cisneros uses the brevity of the vignettes to enhance the imagery to give the most vivid image through her limited amount of words for each of the forty-four vignettes. Not writing in these vignettes would have allowed her to portray more lengthy and not as focused images to her readers with more...

Words: 3794 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

How Did The Great War Shaped Canada's National Identity

...allied war effort intended on carrying out a swift victory over the barbaric ‘Huns’, completing duty before the Canadians could cross the pond. Unfortunately, the campaign emerged into an unprecedented, grueling struggle lasting five years. In all, the conflict claimed the lives of 60,000 Canadian soldiers and wounded 150,000. The loss of life was historic and horrifying. However, through pain and sacrifice, Canada’s contribution and success amongst the brutality and misery defined a new identity for a strong and proud nation. The Great War...

Words: 529 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Racism

...hand. From what I have learnt in the past few weeks, they are all far more present than I had realized. We see it in schools, justice system, job market etc. In the next few pages I will explain how they correlate in Canada today. More specifically relating to aboriginals and Muslims. Canada is home to more than 200 ethnic groups, with 16% of its population (over five million individuals) identifying as a visible minority. Information from the Census showed that Canada’s visible minority population grew 27% from 2001 to 2006, five times faster than the population as a whole. The diversity of Canada’s population is expected to continue to increase over the next two decades. According to projections by Statistics Canada up to 14.4 million Canadians (or about one-third of the population) will be members of a visible minority by 2031. The religious composition of the country is also changing, with some of the largest increases seen in Muslim, Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist denominations (cic.gc.ca). What Is Racism and who does it affect? The core beliefs of racism are that individuals can be divided into different categories based on the behavior, or economic and political success of some individuals within the group of individuals. Researchers have found that these assumptions are incorrect. It has been...

Words: 1540 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

The Rise of Canadian Military Professionalism in World War 1

...The Rise of Canadian Military Professionalism in World War 1 Paul Dickson in his article “The End of the Beginning: The Canadian Corps in 1917,” attempts to answer the question of what factors were responsible for the turnaround in professionalism and capability of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) during the later half of the First World War. The author’s thesis is that the Canadian Corps that fought at Vimy Ridge was not the superlative force that the Canadian public thought they were. In fact, during the early period of World War I, before 1916, the Canadian Corps was still in its infancy and definitely undergoing teething troubles, even though the beginning of a firm and solid base was slowly developing. “The Canadian Corps that took Vimy Ridge was not the “elite” formation it would become in 1918, but the foundation was firmly in place.” Prior to 1916, the author explains that the key ingredients to success that are described as “good habits” and a “good organizational culture” , were not fully in place and prevented the CEF from reaching its maximum operational effectiveness. Dickson is intrigued with the CEF in that there was an element that made them unique to both their Allied and Axis counterparts allowing them to reach this “elite” plateau, as the “Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) shared many of the problems encountered by other armies on the Western Front…” . He attempts to explore this question and seek answers. Was it better equipment...

Words: 792 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Vimy

...Vimy Ridge was the greatest battle ever in the history fought by Canadians. This battle of Vimy Ridge started on April 9, 1971. This battle was the turning point of World War One. The braveness and heroism that Canada displayed while fighting this battle led to an amazing victory and converted Canada from a colony to a powerful nation. The Canadian troops went to Vimy ridge to size that land which Germans had taken away. To get this land, Vimy Ridge, the allies which consisted powerful countries such as United States, the Great Britain and France had also tried but their tries had always failed no matter what. But Canada fought and won the battle making a way to be recognized as such countries. The British had declared the war on Germany in 1914 and Canada who was a British colony at that time was automatically in the battle. They had no option other than to fight with British against Germans. The CEF, Canadian Expeditionary Force joined with the troops sent by Robert Borden were sent to fight under the rules of British. “The CEF soon became the symbol of a new wave of nationalism in Canada.” (www.histori.ca) The Ministry of Overseas Military Forces was created by Borden in the year 1916 and Arthur William Currie became the commander of Canadian Corp in Europe, first Canadian to be appointed in 1917. In this war Canada entered as a colony under the British but by the end of the war it came out with its own identity and with full power. It was proven when Canada signed the treaty...

Words: 481 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Science

...contribution to WWI was successful which allowed them to capture Vimy Ridge. The battle took place at 5:30am 30,000 Canadian soliders who formed the Canadian troops accomplished something that the French and British has failed to do in two years. Leading the Canadians into battle was master and commander Arthur Currie, he was the first Canadian to lead the Canadian troop. Currie developed a new artillery war strategy called the "creeping barrage". The Canadian were given the task of recapturing the ridge, they built railroad tracks so their artillery could keep up the creeping barrage against the German position. When the Canadians weren't controling the front lines they were in a secret training area practicing their assault plan, this new tactic allowed the Canadians to advance on the German trenches that were at the base of the ridge. One of the reasons why they Canadians manage to do things successfully was because the Canadian corps soldiers were given maps of their objectives and given instructions to each individual. This allowed each man knowing what he was doing in the periods of time given, the planning was done until the very seconds to when it would happen. On April 9th 1917 at 5:30am, the Canadians corps begin firing all the field guns This battle gave Canada a new identify, an identity which would give them a much more respected title. The Canadian soldiers who did the impossible of taking over the ridge which was something the French and British had failed the...

Words: 294 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Two Solitude

...slightly marred by MacLennan's over-idealistic nationalism. The Canada that MacLennan presents, a country in which a citizen is either French-Canadian or English-Canadian (or a rare hybrid) never really existed, but the political climate prompted by this illusion is still with us. MacLennan's novel is one of the most sympathetic (and readable) literary chronicles of the tensions and misunderstandings that gave birth to modern Quebec. --Jack Illingworth “Two solitudes”, which was written by Hugh McLennan at 1945, was his most famous novel. The Author, Hugh MacLennan was born in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, 1907. There are about seven novels, travel books and uncountable essays that mediate between the European cultural heritage and American vigor and idealism. “Among his many honors, he won five Governor Generals Awards.” And finally, Hugh MacLennan died in Montreal in 1990. It was a literary allegory for English and French Canadian from 1917 to 1939. The author divided this novel into 4 parts. “It is set during World War I, and a cast of “archetype” characters relay the story, being representations of French Canadians or Catholics or Businessman during this time period.” The novel’s plot was focus on the life of the fictional character named Paul Tallard, who is struggling between the differences of his English and French Canadian identities. According to the analysis that I found on the Internet, someone said that “There is only one sentence in the whole novel containing this expression:...

Words: 843 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Two Solitude

...slightly marred by MacLennan's over-idealistic nationalism. The Canada that MacLennan presents, a country in which a citizen is either French-Canadian or English-Canadian (or a rare hybrid) never really existed, but the political climate prompted by this illusion is still with us. MacLennan's novel is one of the most sympathetic (and readable) literary chronicles of the tensions and misunderstandings that gave birth to modern Quebec. --Jack Illingworth “Two solitudes”, which was written by Hugh McLennan at 1945, was his most famous novel. The Author, Hugh MacLennan was born in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, 1907. There are about seven novels, travel books and uncountable essays that mediate between the European cultural heritage and American vigor and idealism. “Among his many honors, he won five Governor Generals Awards.” And finally, Hugh MacLennan died in Montreal in 1990. It was a literary allegory for English and French Canadian from 1917 to 1939. The author divided this novel into 4 parts. “It is set during World War I, and a cast of “archetype” characters relay the story, being representations of French Canadians or Catholics or Businessman during this time period.” The novel’s plot was focus on the life of the fictional character named Paul Tallard, who is struggling between the differences of his English and French Canadian identities. According to the analysis that I found on the Internet, someone said that “There is only one sentence in the whole novel containing this expression:...

Words: 312 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Vimy Ridge In Canad Rhetorical Analysis

...the myth even exists? The need for a definitive symbol of Canadian identity is the answer. Jeff Keshen argues that “the rapid growth of autonomy in Australia and Canada following the Great War helped to ensure that popular discourse continued to depict superior, courageous and noble soldiers.” As nationalist politicians in both dominions sought greater autonomy, the image of a strong national army representing the nascent nation was no doubt invaluable. For example, Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King drew heavily on the battle’s symbolism in his rhetoric. The unity that the myth built was necessary in moving towards an autonomous Canadian nation, and “the power of the mythicized version of the war experience, then, was considerable.” Rather than delve into the more technical examples Canadian successes during the First World War, it is far easier for a politician to capture the romantic, nationalist spirit of an audience with a...

Words: 1086 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Battle Of Vimy Ridge Essay

...The great Battle of Vimy Ridge is a powerful symbol for Canadian nationalism, and a source of national pride, and identity. The unity, strength, and independence that our nation showed in this fight are the reason why this battle was a key event in Canada’s development as a nation during the World War I. The battle of Vimy ridge was a special time for Canada. Coming together as a nation, all Canadian divisions united for the first time and regained the ridge. After the French and the British had failed, the Canadians strategically planned a way to win. “In those few minutes I witnessed the birth of a nation” – B-General A.E. Ross. Something to take from this statement is that there was now a union, and a sense of nationalism for all Canadian divisions. This was something new, this was the beginning of a journey; it was the start of Canada. After defeating the Germans in the Battle of Vamy Ridge, Canada finally rose up from underneath the shadow of Britain and received credit for its own victory. Although Canada did not become independent and free from the control of the British until 1982, it was recognized as a nation, and as...

Words: 485 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Global Marketing

...c) Borrowing Euros from the Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt at 5% interest rate If XCF borrows in foreign currency, they will have to convert it immediately in dollars at today’s spot rate. In one year’s time, they will have to pay back the bank in the currency they borrowed it plus interest. To do so, they will convert U.S. dollars using the spot rate in a year’s time. Currently, the exchange rates are: 1 Euro = $1.50 and 1 British Pound = $2.00. The estimate of XCF’s CFO is that in one year, the British Pound will depreciate relative to the U.S. Dollar by 10% and the Euro will appreciate relative to the U.S. Dollar by 5%. From which bank should XCF borrow and why? Show all your calculations! Question #2 (75 points) A small Canadian company in pharmaceuticals has developed a new drug and is considering selling it to the European Union market. The company is considering the following options: a) Manufacture the product at home and let foreign agents handle marketing and sales b) Manufacture the product at home and set up a wholly owned subsidiary in Europe to handle marketing and sales c) Enter an alliance with a major European pharmaceutical firm. The product will be manufactured in Europe by the 50/50 joint venture and marketed by the European firm. List all the information you would need to know before deciding which option is the best. Question #3 (75 points) Italy is one of the few European countries that Starbucks has not...

Words: 422 - Pages: 2