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Caribbean Music

In: Film and Music

Submitted By kamz246
Words 1862
Pages 8
Unlike many other forms of art, music is universal and can be reached by anyone, anywhere. It is recognized as one of the earliest art forms due to the several mentions of music in the Bible. When you ask anyone the question, “What is music?” many of them will reply, “Music is life!”, “Music is the voice of the world!” and I totally agree with them in saying that. In my opinion music is a powerful art form that uses one of the most vital senses to portray a message. Music evolves feeling; it is a mean by which individuals (artiste) express their beliefs and ideas, address issues and share stories and experiences to the world.

In this essay, I will be assessing the role that reggae has played in the development of the Caribbean identity. Music is part of our cultural identity, it’s prevalence in the region helps define the Caribbean civilisation and identity gained through time.

The root of Caribbean identity lies in slavery, race, language and the ecology of the region but the term transcends further to include the various types of cuisine, music, ethnicities, religions and cultures present in the Caribbean today. The Caribbean remains one of the most diverse regions on earth, it can be referred to as multi-racial, multi-lingual and some might even say, multi-cultural. The history of music in the Caribbean dates as far back as the Neo-Indians who inhabited the region pre-Christopher Columbus. They had a ceremony referred to as “areito” at which the indigenous people sang and danced to the rhythmic beat of the slit-drums, rattles and other percussion instruments. This proves that music has been around for a very long time.

According to the Prime Minister of St. Vincent and Grenadines, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves in his rephrasal of the late Rex Nettleford’s dictum in musical parlance, he said:

“We are the sounds of the Caribs, the Arawaks and the…...

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