Free Essay

Carl Jung

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By lucyc2514
Words 1399
Pages 6
Carl Gustav Jung was born on 26 July 1875 and died on 6th June 1961. Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology.
Carl Jung was an early supporter of Freud because of their shared interest in the unconscious. He was an active member of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society. Carl agreed with Freud in many areas but not in regards to the Oedipus Complex.
Jung proposed and developed the concepts of extraversion and introversion archetypes and the collective unconscious. His work has been influential in psychiatry and in the study of religion, philosophy, archeology, anthropology, literature, and related fields.
Much of Carl’s work was not published until after his death.
Carl Jung believed that “the central concept of analytical psychology is individuation the psychological process of integrating the opposites, including the conscious with the unconscious, while still maintaining their relative autonomy”. Jung considered individuation to be the central process of any human development.
The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a popular psychometric instrument, was developed from Jung's theory of psychological types.
Jung saw the human psyche as "by nature religious" and made this religiousness the focus of his explorations.]Jung is one of the best known contemporary contributors to dream analysis and symbolisation.
Through research, I have discovered Jung was a practising clinician and considered himself to be a scientist, much of his life's work was spent exploring areas such as Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology, and sociology, as well as literature and the arts. Jung's interest in philosophy and the occult see him a mystic person, even though he wanted to be seen as a man of science.
One of Jung’s greatest contributions to psychology is his theory of personality types. Jung found that different people think, feel, and experience the world in fundamentally different ways. His type theory is a powerful tool to help us understand how people function.

Jung identified four fundamental psychological functions: thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition. Each function may be experienced in an introverted or an extraverted fashion.

In my opinion I do believe that people do have introverted or extroverted personalities. For example an introvert or people with introverted tendencies, tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds.

An extrovert is on the other hand get their energy from other people. Extroverts actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social. I myself believe I am an extrovert and definitely feel better when I am around people in positive social situations. As far as I remember when I was little I used to be shy around people I didn’t know, especially adults but when I had met them a few times I would be my normal chatty social self.

Through researching Carl Jung, I have learnt that thinking and feeling are alternative ways of forming judgments and making decisions. For example thinking asks the question “What does this mean?” Consistency and abstract principles are highly valued. Thinking types are the greatest planners; however, they tend to hold on to their plans and abstract theories even when confronted by new and contradictory evidence.

Feeling is focused on value. It may include judgments of good vs. bad and right vs. wrong. Feeling asks the question “What value does this have?”

Jung classified sensation and intuition together as ways of gathering information, as distinct from ways of making decisions. Sensation refers to a focus on direct sense experience, perception of details, and concrete facts: what one can see, touch, and smell. Tangible, immediate experience is given priority over discussion or analysis of experience. Sensation asks the question “What exactly am I perceiving?” Sensing types tend to respond to the immediate situation and deal effectively and efficiently with all sorts of crisis and emergencies. They generally work better with tools and materials than do any of the other types.

Intuition is a way of comprehending perceptions in terms of possibilities, past experience, future goals, and unconscious processes Intuition asks the question “What might happen, what is possible?” The implications of experience are more important to intuitives than the actual experience itself. Strongly intuitive people add meaning to their perceptions so rapidly that they often cannot separate their interpretations from the raw sensory data. Intuitives integrate new information quickly, automatically relating past experience and relevant information to immediate experience. Because it often includes unconscious material, intuitive thinking appears to proceed by leaps and bounds.

Jung has called the least-developed function in each individual the inferior function. It is the least conscious and the most primitive, or undifferentiated. For some people it can represent a seemingly demonic influence because they have so little understanding of or control over it. For example, strongly intuitive types, who are not in touch with their sensation function, may experience sexual impulses as mysterious or even dangerous. Since it is less consciously developed, the inferior function may also serve as a way into the unconscious. Jung has said that it is through our inferior function that which is least developed in us, that we see God. By struggling with and confronting inner obstacles, we can come closer to the Divine.

For the individual, a combination of all four functions results in a well-rounded approach to the world:

According to Carl G. Jung's theory of psychological types [Jung, 1971], people can be characterised by their preference of general attitude:
Extraverted (E) vs. Introverted (I), their preference of one of the two functions of perception:
Sensing (S) vs. Intuition (N), and their preference of one of the two functions of judging:
Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F
Jung also proposed that in a person one of the four functions above is dominant – either a function of perception or a function of judging
Conclusion.
Jung principle of opposing pairs do not consider a person’s mental or emotional health, functionality, ability, effectiveness or emotional resilience, though this omission is partially addressed in later work evolved from the Myers-Briggs tests. There appears an assumption that each pair operates independently from each other not in conjunction and/or that a specific (non Jungian) trait may be exhibited in more than one Jungian attribute, McCrae (1989) p23-24 though this view is not supported by others, Boyle 1995).

Find out more from UK Essays here: http://www.ukessays.com/essays/psychology/describe-and-evaluate-jungs-theory-concerning-personality-types-psychology-essay.php#ixzz3Fa9fLK2W
In my opinion Carl Jungs theory concerning personality types usefully help a therapist to determine therapeutic goals by
Personality test I completed
ENFJ
Extravert(78%) iNtuitive(12%) Feeling(38%) Judging(22%) • You have strong preference of Extraversion over Introversion (78%) • You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%) • You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (38%) • You have slight preference of Judging over Perceiving (22%

ENFJ Description

by Joe Butt
ENFJs are the benevolent 'pedagogues' of humanity. They have tremendous charisma by which many are drawn into their nurturant tutelage and/or grand schemes. Many ENFJs have tremendous power to manipulate others with their phenomenal interpersonal skills and unique salesmanship. But it's usually not meant as manipulation -- ENFJs generally believe in their dreams, and see themselves as helpers and enablers, which they usually are.

ENFJs are global learners. They see the big picture. The ENFJs focus is expansive. Some can juggle an amazing number of responsibilities or projects simultaneously. Many ENFJs have tremendous entrepreneurial ability.

ENFJs are, by definition, Js, with whom we associate organization and decisiveness. But they don't resemble the SJs or even the NTJs in organization of the environment nor occasional recalcitrance. ENFJs are organized in the arena of interpersonal affairs. Their offices may or may not be cluttered, but their conclusions (reached through feelings) about people and motives are drawn much more quickly and are more resilient than those of their NFP counterparts.

ENFJs know and appreciate people. Like most NFs, (and Feelers in general), they are apt to neglect themselves and their own needs for the needs of others. They have thinner psychological boundaries than most, and are at risk for being hurt or even abused by less sensitive people. ENFJs often take on more of the burdens of others than they can bear.

[pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic]

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Carl Jung

...[pic] CARL JUNG   1875 - 1961   Dr. C. George Boeree   [pic] Anyone who wants to know the human psyche will learn next to nothing from experimental psychology.  He would be better advised to abandon exact science, put away his scholar's gown, bid farewell to his study, and wander with human heart throught the world.  There in the horrors of prisons, lunatic asylums and hospitals, in drab suburban pubs, in brothels and gambling-hells, in the salons of the elegant, the Stock Exchanges, socialist meetings, churches, revivalist gatherings and ecstatic sects, through love and hate, through the experience of passion in every form in his own body, he would reap richer stores of knowledge than text-books a foot thick could give him, and he will know how to doctor the sick with a real knowledge of the human soul. -- Carl Jung Freud said that the goal of therapy was to make the unconscious conscious. He certainly made that the goal of his work as a theorist. And yet he makes the unconscious sound very unpleasant, to say the least: It is a cauldron of seething desires, a bottomless pit of perverse and incestuous cravings, a burial ground for frightening experiences which nevertheless come back to haunt us. Frankly, it doesn't sound like anything I'd like to make conscious! A younger colleague of his, Carl Jung, was to make the exploration of this "inner space" his life's work. He went equipped with a background in Freudian theory, of course, and with an apparently......

Words: 7916 - Pages: 32

Premium Essay

Carl Jung Symbol

...Savinja Gurung Mrs. Cheatham English 100 Feb 10, 2015 Critical Analysis of Carl Jung’s “The Importance of Dreams” Jung, one of the most important and most complex psychological theorist of all time, holds the belief that dreams are symbols of human unconsciousness. He finds the very intimate relationship between symbol, unconsciousness and dreams. In his essay “ The Importance of Dreams”, Jung describes that man produces symbols unconsciously and spontaneously, in the forms of dreams. He says that dreams are outlet of unconsciousness. He describes that how human incompetence to define and inability to explain certain things which is beyond human reasoning always expressed using different varieties of symbols such as natural symbols, cultural symbols and religious symbols. Jung’s idea is valid because things beyond the range of human understanding stores unconsciously without our conscious knowledge in human psyche which is revealed to us in a dream as a symbolic image. Jung believes that human unconsciousness exists and it expresses itself through our dreams using symbolic language. He asserts that “whoever denies the existence of the unconsciousness is in fact assuming that our present knowledge of the psyche is total. And this belief is clearly just as false as the assumption that we know all there is to be known about the natural universe” (192). Jung is right here because human race doesn’t know all about the natural universe. Human psyche is......

Words: 1170 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud

...Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud Introduction Carl Jung (1875-1961) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) were two individuals whose theories on human personality would completely affect the way that people viewed the human mind. Carl Gustav was a practicing psychotherapist while Sigmund Freud created the discipline of psychoanalysis. The two men had seemingly identical beliefs about human behavior, but also had contrasting beliefs about concepts such as the ego, the psyche, and the state of unconsciousness. Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud’s Theories Sigmund Freud’s beliefs about personality were based on past experiences in an individual’s childhood. Freud stated that all human beings had three personality levels. These were the ego, the id, and the superego. The level of the id is the one that houses a person’s primitive drives and supports the enactment of decisions that are purely based on pleasure. The id’s objective is to avoid pain at all costs and only seek pleasurable sensations. The ego, on the other hand, identifies the significance of reality and makes decisions based on concepts such as judgment, perception recognition, and memory. The last level, the superego, is dedicated to seeking perfection (Reber, 2006). This level houses the individual’s accepted social morals and ideals in the conscience. Jung had different views about the different mental levels in the conscious mind. Instead of the ego, id, and superego, Jung perceived the human thought process as constituting......

Words: 1423 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Carl Jung: Key Concepts of Personality Theory and Application

...Carl Jung: Key Concepts of Personality Theory and Application The degree to which one attains their own level of psychological development and understanding is often the product of an enduring and precarious pilgrimage bound by one of the most mystifying phenomenon’s known to mankind: the human mind. The ability to render complete understanding of the intricate workings of the mind has not only been cradled at the pentacle of research and academia for centuries, but is at the heart of each individual’s personal journey through life. The concept of understanding one's self can be as complex and overwhelming as trying to understand humanity as a whole; however, there have been many profound movements in thought and theory that conjure strong insight to how we may be able to achieve the ultimate meaning behind it all. Carl Gustav Jung, the founder of Analytical Psychology, went beyond rational thinking to discover the truth of one’s existence; by redirecting the purpose towards the concept of self knowledge, and by reshaping the concept of one’s Self. The nature of Jungian psychology is derived from mythological, mystical, and spiritual concepts which provided the framework for Carl Jung’s quest to develop a “science of the soul” (In lecture June 28, 2011, PSY 225 class, Professor C. Johnston). Jung created his own novel approach to understanding the human mind by cutting through the obscurity of reality and enthralling into a much deeper venture of transcendent......

Words: 2693 - Pages: 11

Premium Essay

Carl Jung

...Carl Jung was a Swiss psychotherapist and psychiatrist who founded the school of analytical psychology. He became the protégé of Sigmund Freud but he began to drift apart from him when they began to have different views. He rejected the latter’s emphasis on sex as the main focus of behavior motivation. He is best known for his concepts on introversion and extraversion; these contributed to personality psychology and have influenced psychotherapy. I can say that as an individual, I like to hang out with my friends. I like to meet new people and talk with them. Through meeting different kinds of people, I feel that the way I see the world is in a different light; I see it in a different way. Though there are times when I prefer to be alone, there also time when I like to be around people. I can’t really say that I am an extrovert since I don’t always like to be in parties and social gatherings. I also like to spend my free time reading books. But people always tell me that I am one because I am loud and talkative and it’s not hard for me to get along with people. Carl Jung said that, “People are not purely introverted or extraverted; each person has both introverted and extroverted aspects to his or her nature, and both factors involve complex variations. One set is dominant (conscious) while the other is inferior (unconscious).” I believe that my extrovert personality is dominant over my introvert personality. So to clear things up if indeed I’m an extrovert, I......

Words: 450 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Religions of the World

...Carl Gustav Jung was born on July 26, 1875 in the Swiss village of Kessewil to Paul and Emile Jung. Carl had an interest in language and literature. He was a quiet child and he showed little to no interest in school. Carl was not competitive and he would fake sickness in order to get out of going to school. Carl eventually settled on a career in psychiatry after he went to school for archaeology and studying medicine at the University of Basel he ultimately felt a deeper connection with psychiatry. Carl Jung was a follower of Sigmund Freud and in 1907 he met him. They quickly became friends sharing a mutual interest in psychoanalysis Freud considered Jung to be the heir to the psychoanalysis theory. Carl became a member of a small association that was created by Sigmund Freud. Carl Jung began to realize that he did not totally agree with the theory that Sigmund founded. Their relationship began to deteriorate because Carl did not agree with all of Sigmund’s beliefs he believed that Freud place too much emphasis on sexuality (Boeree, 1997-2006). Carl’s beliefs differed from Freud’s and he decided to go his own way and focus more on the beliefs that he witnessed or thought to be true of the human behavior. This theory and theoretical disagreement caused the two friends and partners to part ways. Jung then embarked on forming his own school of thought which is known as analytical psychology. This theory divides the psyche into three parts. The ego which identifies with the......

Words: 320 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Psch Essay

...Carl Jung Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of the school of analytical psychology. He proposed and developed the concepts of the extroverted and introverted personality, archetypes, and the collective unconscious. The issues that he dealt with arose from his personal experiences. For many years Jung felt as if he had two separate personalities. One introverted and other extroverted. This interplay resulted in his study of integration and wholeness. His work has been influential not only in psychology, but in religion and literature as well (Cowgil, 1997). Jung was born on July 26, 1875 in Kesswil, Switzerland, the only son of a Protestant clergyman. At the age of four his family moved to Basel. His childhood was a lonely one. Jung observed his parents and teachers and tried to understand there behavior, especially that of his father. His father had a failing belief in religion. Jung could never understand why. There were numerous relatives on either side of his family that were clergymen. It was expected of Jung to continue in the family tradition. Jung did not decide to follow, choosing instead to attend the University of Basel from 1895-1900. Before deciding to pursue medicine Jung studied biology, zoology, paleontology, and archaeology. His explorations did not stop with that, he looked at philosophy, mythology, early Christian literature as well as religion. His interest in religion could be attributed to his heritage as well as......

Words: 354 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Science

...Personality Theories Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Carl Rogers, and Abraham Maslow Name Date School Class Personality theory is a large area of psychological research and there exists many different ideas concerning how personality is formed. Despite there being a multitude of these theories there are four theorists who had the largest influence in the development of personality theory. These theorists include: Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Carl Rogers, and Abraham Maslow. Sigmund Freud The most well-known and one of the earliest personality theories was posited by Sigmund Freud. Freud proposed what is known as the psychodynamic perspective. The psychodynamic perspective describes personality in terms of the mind being divided into three functional areas. Freud described the mind’s functional areas in terms of id, ego, and superego. According to Freud, the id is the instinctual area of the mind, the ego is the rational or logical control area of the mind, and the superego is portion of the mind that provides moral standards and values (Kowalski & Westen, 2009). Psychoanalytic theory posits that personality is developed through the interaction of these three portions of the mind (Kowalski & Westen, 2009). According to Freud “behavior is ultimately determined by unconscious sexual and aggressive drives and by the complex intrapsychic conflicts that arise in daily life.” (McAdams, 2009) Freud’s theory considers personality to be a result of underlying beliefs and...

Words: 1198 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Personality Theories

...of “physical, mental, emotional, and characteristics of an individual” (Dictionary.com, 2005). Thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are the elements that make each individual’s personality unique and although people may carry the same traits, not one personality is exactly like another. An individual’s personality might alter throughout one’s life, but the foundation remains consistent. Consistency or a regularity of behavior is a component to one’s personality. According to Cherry (2014), personality is of both psychological and physiological construct. There are many theories that psychologists conceive in order to better understand and explain the development of an individual’s personality. Psychologists, such as Sigmond Freud, Carl Jung, Carl Roberts, and Abraham Maslow, devised their own theories on how one’s personality develops based on their own beliefs and research. Sigmond Freud was one of the world’s most controversial psychologists. His theories on personality and thoughts on human behavior and beliefs about the conscious and unconscious mind made an immense impact within the world of psychology. Some of Freud’s beliefs and personality theories focused primarily on sexual desires and motivations. Throughout his life, Freud established many theories that “were enormously influential, but subject to considerable criticism both now and during his own life.”(Cherry, 2014) He was the founder of the psychoanalytic theory which concentrated on the unconscious......

Words: 1081 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Psychology

...Carl Jung, Alfred Adler and Sigmund Freud are known to be Pioneers of psychology, influential thinkers and major contributors to the modern science of psychology. All three men had very different distinct theories, but all shared one thing they were very passionate when it came to their endeavors and their thoughts and never settled with conclusion. The three dedicated their entire lives to a better understanding of the human mind and how it works, the commitment they made to psychology contributed significantly to how we practice it today. Among these three founders of mind science, Freud is indisputably the most acclaimed and was a birthing factor that helped to develop the work of the latter two. Sigmund Freud, considered to most in the field as “The Father of Modern Psychology”, viewed the human psyche from a sexual perspective sometimes so much that one might find his works strange, and somewhat perverse but none the less revolutionary and genius. Freud theorized that the human mind was made up of three basic components. The three components are “The Id”,” The Ego”, and “The Superego”. These three individual parts of the human mind often conflict with one another, shaping personality. Adler’s psychology, which he called "Individual Psychology," was based on indivisibility of the personality. His most notable stray from Freud's teaching was Adler’s belief that it was vital to view the human being as a whole entity. Whereas Frued portrays the human as a large combination...

Words: 1342 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Peresonality Thories

...Personality Theories Dena Headley BEH/225 November 15, 2014 Karen Pasveer Personality Theories Personality theory is a large area of psychological research, and there exists many different ideas concerning how personality is formed. A theory will present a systematic way of understanding behaviors and employs specific factors that are considered important. Despite there being a multitude of these theories, there are four theorists who had the largest influence in the development of personality theory. Those theorists include Freud, Jung, Rogers, and Maslow (Coon & Mitterer, 2013). Sigmund Freud The most well-known and one of the earliest personality theories were posited by Sigmund Freud. Freud proposed what is known as the psychodynamic perspective. The psychodynamic perspective describes personality in terms of the mind being divided into three functional areas. Freud described the minds functional areas in terms of the id, ego, and superego. According to Freud, the id is the instinctual area of the mind, the ego is the rational or logical control area of the mind, and the superego is the portion of the mind that provides moral standards and values (Coon & Mitterer, 2013). Psychoanalytic theory posits that a personality is developed through the interaction of these three portions of the mind. According to Freud “behavior, is ultimately determined by unconscious sexual and aggressive drives and by the complex intrapsychic conflicts that arise in daily......

Words: 1200 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Jung

...Jung was a follower of Freud and his theory held some similar traits. This theory includes the conscious, the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious. Carl Jung believed we are motivated by images passed down by our ancestors as well as our repressed experiences. The things we inherited from our ancestors he named the collective unconscious. His theory is full of past events and future expectations. Images we inherit from our ancestors are called archetypes. Personal unconscious holds repressed thoughts of one individual. Consciousness is a very small piece of personality. Jung believed personality comes from mostly unconscious. Just like Freud, Jung’s theory is hard to prove or disprove. Jung was a follower of Freud and his theory held some similar traits. This theory includes the conscious, the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious. Carl Jung believed we are motivated by images passed down by our ancestors as well as our repressed experiences. The things we inherited from our ancestors he named the collective unconscious. His theory is full of past events and future expectations. Images we inherit from our ancestors are called archetypes. Personal unconscious holds repressed thoughts of one individual. Consciousness is a very small piece of personality. Jung believed personality comes from mostly unconscious. Just like Freud, Jung’s theory is hard to prove or disprove. Carl Jung- Analytical Psychology Carl Jung- Analytical......

Words: 844 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Psychoanalytic Personality Assessment

...comparison and contrast the psychoanalytic theories of Freud, Jung, and Adler are very different and unique. However, Freud, Jung, and Adler are not at all alike. Freud based most psychological things on sexuality. Jung, promoted the concept of archetypes, and Adler believed in the “will power” theory Adler also believed that fundamentally, human beings are self-determined. Freud is big on self-consciousness; Jung said “the aim of life is to know oneself, and to know one is to plumb the depths of the inchoate seas of not only the personal unconscious but the collective unconscious as well.” Adler stated that “individual psychology based on the idea of the indivisibility of one’s personality.” Freud, Jung, and Adler became fast friends through their avid interest in psychology. Alfred Adler, a medical doctor with a deep interest in psychology and human nature, met Freud in their native Vienna in 1900 at a medical conference where Freud presented his new theories about dreams and the unconscious. Freud met Jung and after a mega- meeting of thirteen hours of discussion, became cohorts in spreading the wonder of psychoanalysis (Bridle & Edlestein, 2000, Spring/Summer). Alfred Adler and Carl Jung liked Freud’s definitions of id, ego, and superego, but had no interest in the sexual ideation in his theory. There was also significant tension between Freud and Jung. Freud believed that religion had no place in psychological theory. “Carl Jung separated from Sigmund Freud to develop......

Words: 1176 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Psychoanalytic Personality Assessment

...such as Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Adler answer these fascinating questions through systematic observations about how and why individuals behave as they do. These personality psychologists tend to avoid abstract philosophical or religious musings and focus instead on the thoughts, feelings, and, behaviors of real people. In this assessment I will talk about Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Adler’s theories and explain what makes each of them different. Sigmund Freud had different views on comprehending how people act. Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Alder are very different. Freud hinted that childhood experiences, repressed erotic feelings, and unconscious conflicts can affect adult behavior. Freud believed that the motivating force of a dream is wish fulfillment. However, Freud based most psychological things on sexuality. Freud believed that every imagery and symbol that appears in a dream have a sexual connotation. For example, anxiety dreams were seen as a sign of repressed sexual impulses. Carl Jung promotes the concept of archetypes, which are the images, patterns, and symbols that rise out of the collective unconscious and appear in dreams, mythology, and fairy tales. Jung was different from Freud because he believed that dreams can reveal others motives than aggression and sexuality. Freud also believed that dreams had a meaning. Jung was never completely into Freud’s idea, so he left Freud to develop his own theory. Jung called his theory......

Words: 1115 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Psycho

...Sigmund Freud, Carl G. Jung, Karen Horneye, and so on) were born into the world. They had a fascination with the unconscious mind. They later became famous psychologists with several views and opinions. Sigmund Freud was a psychoanalytic who studied the unconscious approach to understanding one’s personality. Though his work was the foundation for others with and after him, Sigmund Freud will always be known for his work. Carl Gustav Jung was a Neo-Freudian who in the beginning worked side-by-side with Freud until he branched away from Freud and conducted his own theory called Analytical Psychology (Friedman & Schustack, 2012). “According to Jungian theory, the mind or psyche is divided into three parts: (1) the conscious ego, (2) the personal unconscious, and (3) the collective unconscious” (Friedman & Schustack, 2012, p 109). According to Alfred Adler, the major force of all human activity is a striving from a feeling of inferiority toward perfection. Adler at first referred to this force as aggressive drive. He later called the force a striving for superiority. Adler termed his school of thought individual psychology. Today, it is often referred to as Adlerian psychology (p. 58). According to Jung’s way of thinking, Freud did have some good points as far as the unconscious goes such as dreams, but Jung soon realized that Freud had some flaws/unattainable truths to his work. Therefore, Jung explored more and deeper into the subconscious of the brain. Jung......

Words: 1023 - Pages: 5