Premium Essay

Case Analysis “Robert Princeton”

In: Business and Management

Submitted By my3kids
Words 409
Pages 2
Case Analysis

“Robert Princeton”

Tutorial of the Learned Needs Theory
Learned needs theory is known as the Three Need Theory…the need of: • Achievement (nAch) • Affiliation (nAff) • Power (nPower)
According to Schermerhorn, Hunt, Osborn & Uhl-Bien (2010), the need for achievement (nAch), is to do better or more efficiently…master the complex tasks. Need for affiliation (nAff), establish a warm relationship with others. Lastly, need for power (nPower), to control, influence behavior, responsible for others.

Problem Identification
Robert Princeton was hired as an Assistant Manager for a family-owned video rental business. His immediate supervisor was Mario, the son of the owners. Robert functions were assisting Mario with his daily operation duties. Although Robert was considered to be a valued employee by the owners, Mario did not value or respect Robert’s decisions and recommendations as an assistant manager which resulted in his submission of his resignation. Overall, Mario was not considered an effective manager, therefore, lacked organizational behavior (ob).

Robert was faced with many challenges as the assistant manager and became burnout. However, without a doubt, he displayed excellent job involvement dedicating himself to his job and responsibilities. Robert demonstrated all three needs theory. • Achievement (nAch): Robert took initiative; he made significant changes within three months. i.e., recommendation for purchase and resale, personnel and management practice designed to boost morale, most importantly, reduce turnover and absenteeism. • Affiliation (nAff): Robert got to know every employee personally. He presented good human skills. He worked well with all the employees, gaining trust and enthusiasm and involvement. • Power (nPower): Despite of Robert’s frustrations, he posed a sense of control by keeping up...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Case Analysis Case Analysis “Robert Princeton” Loginjoin Rss ©2012 Termpaperwarehouse.Com Privacy Policy Terms of Service Copyright Information Contact Us Help Advertise with Us

...Charlotte Beers (Ogilvy & Mather) Case analysis At the point of planning to the launch of the business, the owner of the business is very passionate and usually experienced in the line-of-business; as David Ogilvy was at the age of 38 when he started his own advertising agency in 1948. Ogilvy & Mather, an advertising agency was started in New York and expanded worldwide. By 1991, O&M was ranked the largest marketing company in the world.[1] But there comes a time when a company must look to adapt a change. With competition growing, clients of O&M changed their demands. O&M was a high-cost agency that was failing in controlling their budget and lowering their cost; they failed to see the reason for a change. Due to that fact, O&M had lost few of their multi-million dollar accounts. Many companies may have either filed bankruptcy or have shutdown in the process of losing their clients but O&M was not the type of company that would give up that easily. In 1992, Charlotte Beers was appointed CEO of O&M and a massive change was underway. She was not the type of person who would dwell on the past, but instead look to better the future. Charlotte Beers clearly made an impression on the O&M employees as she had the ability to inspire. But more importantly, she came up with three strategies which turned the company around 360 degrees; Client Security, Better Work/More Often, and Financial Discipline. Yes these strategies were formed for an advertising......

Words: 492 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Butt

...1 The Foundations of International Society 2013-2014 Part I: Politics 2 (International Relations I) Paper organiser: Professor Christopher Hill (POLIS): Room 105, Alison Richard Building Email: cjh68@cam.ac.uk Lecturers: Professor Hill (CH), Dr Elisabetta Brighi (EB), Dr Aaron Rapport (AR) and Dr Stefano Recchia (SR). Aims and Objectives The course aims to introduce students to the subject of International Relations (IR), whose main focus is the nature of politics at the international level. Students will acquire the empirical and conceptual foundations needed to understand a world political system which cannot be accurately described as either pure anarchy or a coherent form of ‘global governance’. The starting point is the notion of ‘international society’, which refers to the set of institutions and common procedures generated by states over the last three and a half centuries in their attempts to achieve some minimal form of co-existence, but which has gradually evolved to include many non-state actors and different levels of activity – diplomatic, economic and cultural, as well as that of military competition. By the end of the course you should be able to have an informed discussion about: the historical origins of the present system; what is distinctive about international politics as opposed to politics inside the state; and the main challenges which confront humanity in the twenty-first century. You will also acquire a basic familiarity with the main theories......

Words: 12326 - Pages: 50

Free Essay

Ethnic

...Evaluating the role of ethnic identity in explaining the occurrence of contemporary civil conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa. High hopes for many newly independent states of Africa became diminished as the 1990s saw over a quarter of the continent's states facing armed insurgencies within their borders (Young, 2002: 534). Commentators often point to pathological, deep-seated hatreds in an African tribal mosaic as the bases of such conflict. The fact is, however, that the continent is awash with political grudges, ethnically-framed and otherwise, but civil wars rarely break out. Thus this essay seeks to take a more nuanced approach to understand the analytical challenge posed by such disorder. Starting out by countering the centrality of ethnic identity, it firstly seeks to demonstrate that ethnic identities do not exist primordially, but that they are constructed on weak foundations. Secondly it endeavours to show that where cleavages do exist along lines of cultural difference, simple heterogeneity is insufficient to account for the outbreak of conflict. Next, it moves to underline the fact that more important in explaining civil conflict is whether such conflict is feasible. This is understood both in terms of the perceived capacity of the state and in terms of the viability of insurgency for would-be rebels. A final conclusion will then be expounded that ethnicity is not a central factor, but that it is simply one of a number of strategies under which conflict may be......

Words: 2475 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Curriculum Source References

...Curriculum Source References The following references were used in the CFA Institute-produced publications Quantitative Methods for Investment Analysis, Analysis of Equity Investments: Valuation, and Managing Investment Portfolios: A Dynamic Process. Ackerman, Carl, Richard McEnally, and David Ravenscraft. 1999. “The Performance of Hedge Funds: Risk, Return, and Incentives.” Journal of Finance. Vol. 54, No. 3: 833–874. ACLI Survey. 2003. The American Council of Life Insurers. Agarwal, Vikas and Narayan Naik. 2000. “Performance Evaluation of Hedge Funds with OptionBased and Buy-and-Hold Strategies.” Working Paper, London Business School. Ali, Paul Usman and Martin Gold. 2002. “An Appraisal of Socially Responsible Investments and Implications for Trustees and Other Investment Fiduciaries.” Working Paper, University of Melbourne. Almgren, Robert and Neil Chriss. 2000/2001. “Optimal Execution of Portfolio Transactions.” Journal of Risk. Vol. 3: 5–39. Altman, Edward I. 1968. “Financial Ratios, Discriminant Analysis and the Prediction of Corporate Bankruptcy.” Journal of Finance. Vol. 23: 589–699. Altman, Edward I. and Vellore M. Kishore. 1996. “Almost Everything You Wanted to Know about Recoveries on Defaulted Bonds.” Financial Analysts Journal. Vol. 52, No. 6: 57−63. Altman, Edward I., R. Haldeman, and P. Narayanan. 1977. “Zeta Analysis: A New Model to Identify Bankruptcy Risk of Corporations.” Journal of Banking and Finance. Vol. 1: 29−54. Ambachtsheer, Keith, Ronald Capelle,......

Words: 12603 - Pages: 51

Free Essay

Effective Leaders

...The Sanctions Debate and the Logic of Choice David A. Baldwin debate over whether economic sanctions "work" is mired in a scholarly limbo. One writer contends that recent international relations scholarship has promoted optimism about the utility of such measures and sets out to challenge this trend} while another notes the pessimism that "pervades the sanctions literature" and proceeds to argue that it is unjustified. 2 A third scholar cites the sanctions literature as an example of fruitless academic debate with little policy relevance.3 Such divergent readings of the scholarly literature are often explained by differences in ideology or fundamentally different theoretical orientations. This does not seem to be the case with respect to the sanctions debate. Under appropriate circumstances, it is quite possible for liberals, neoliberals, realists, neorealists, or globalists to argue in favor of using economic sanctions. If the sanctions debate is bogged down, the explanation does not seem to lie in the essentially contested nature of the subject matter. A second potential explanation is that scholars are talking past one another because they ask different questions, use different concepts, and set the discussion in different analytical contexts. In short, they are talking about different things. This article explores the second explanation. The basic paradox at the heart of the sanctions debate is that policymakers continue to use sanctions with......

Words: 12612 - Pages: 51

Free Essay

Jon Von Nomann

...Nationality | Hungarian and American | Fields | Mathematics, physics, statistics, economics | Institutions | University of Berlin Princeton University Institute for Advanced Study Site Y, Los Alamos | Alma mater | University of Pázmány Péter ETH Zürich | Doctoral advisor | Lipót Fejér | Other academic advisors | László Rátz | Doctoral students | Donald B. Gillies Israel Halperin | Other notable students | Paul Halmos Clifford Hugh Dowker Benoit Mandelbrot[1] | Known for |  [show] | Notable awards | Bôcher Memorial Prize (1938) Enrico Fermi Award (1956) | Signature | John von Neumann (/vɒn ˈnɔɪmən/; December 28, 1903 – February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian and American pure and applied mathematician, physicist, inventor and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields,[2] including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and fluid dynamics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics.[3] He was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics, in the development of functional analysis, a principal member of the Manhattan Project and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (as one of the few...

Words: 9454 - Pages: 38

Premium Essay

History of Indian Sub Continent

...PAPER 28 THE HISTORY OF THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT FROM THE LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT DAY READING LIST: 2012-13 C. A. Bayly cab1002@cam.ac.uk 1 The History of The Indian Subcontinent From The Late Eighteenth Century To The Present Day A fifth of the world's population lives in the Indian subcontinent. While today the region’s place in the global world order is widely recognised, this is in fact only the most recent chapter in a longer history. This paper offers an understanding of the part played by the Indian subcontinent role and its people in the making of the modern world. From the decline of the great empire of the Mughals and the rise of British hegemony, to the rise of nationalism, the coming of independence and partition, the consolidation of new nation states despite regional wars and conflicts, and the emergence of India as the largest democracy in the world, this paper is a comprehensive and analytical survey of the subcontinent's modern history. The dynamic and complex relationships between changing forms of political power and religious identities, economic transformations, and social and cultural change are studied in the period from 1757 to 2007. In normal circumstances students will be given 6 supervisions in groups of 1 or 2. Key themes and brief overview: The paper begins by examining the rise of British power in the context of economic developments indigenous to southern Asia; it analyses the role played by Indian polities and social......

Words: 11803 - Pages: 48

Free Essay

Foss

...philosophy simply states that it is the right of every user to use, modify, and distribute computer software for any purpose. The right to use, distribute, modify and redistribute derivative versions, the so called "four freedoms," are based in and representative of an extreme form of anti-discrimination resistant to categorization into the typical “left, center and right” political schema. This element of nondiscrimination, coupled with the broad nature of FOSS's philosophical foundation, enables the easy adoption of FOSS technologies. FOSS's broadly defined freedom acts as an important starting point and one conceptual hinge useful in understanding the wide circulation of FOSS as a set of technologies, signs, methodologies and philosophies. An analysis of the way in which this philosophical and legal form is animated and redirected in particular ways through the use of FOSS technologies and licensing schemes. It is to three contrasting examples of such transmutations that we now turn to. Hiring a cadre of FOSS developers to work in-house on FOSS software, IBM launched the first nationwide advertising campaign promoting the FOSS operating system GNU/Linux. In their first campaign, they highlighted the ideas of openness and freedom in ways that, unsurprisingly,...

Words: 794 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

For One

...Interdependence and Conflict: An Introduction Edward D. Mansfield and Brian M. Pollins Over the past few decades, there has been a surge of interest in the relationship between economic interdependence and political con›ict. One view that has gained considerable popularity and empirical support is that heightened interdependence fosters cooperative political relations. Voiced with increasing regularity in both academic and policy circles, this claim has been used to help justify the formation of the European Economic Community, Richard Nixon’s opening to China, Willy Brandt’s Ostpolitik, and Henry Kissinger’s conception of détente with the Soviet Union. Nonetheless, critics of this argument have not been stilled. Some observers maintain that, rather than fostering cooperation, increased interdependence generates political discord. Even more widespread is the argument that economic exchange has no strong bearing on the high politics of national security. This debate is hardly new. For centuries, the nature and strength of the links between interdependence and con›ict have been the subject of heated disagreement. Until lately, however, these links remained the subject of remarkably little systematic scrutiny. In recent years, a growing number of studies have attempted to ‹ll this gap in the literature, but they have yet to resolve various crucial questions. Most important, how and to what extent does interdependence in›uence political antagonism? What are the......

Words: 11753 - Pages: 48

Free Essay

Finance Behavioural

...Behavioural Finance Martin Sewell University of Cambridge February 2007 (revised April 2010) Abstract An introduction to behavioural finance, including a review of the major works and a summary of important heuristics. 1 Introduction Behavioural finance is the study of the influence of psychology on the behaviour of financial practitioners and the subsequent effect on markets. Behavioural finance is of interest because it helps explain why and how markets might be inefficient. For more information on behavioural finance, see Sewell (2001). 2 History Back in 1896, Gustave le Bon wrote The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind, one of the greatest and most influential books of social psychology ever written (le Bon 1896). Selden (1912) wrote Psychology of the Stock Market. He based the book ‘upon the belief that the movements of prices on the exchanges are dependent to a very considerable degree on the mental attitude of the investing and trading public’. In 1956 the US psychologist Leon Festinger introduced a new concept in social psychology: the theory of cognitive dissonance (Festinger, Riecken and Schachter 1956). When two simultaneously held cognitions are inconsistent, this will produce a state of cognitive dissonance. Because the experience of dissonance is unpleasant, the person will strive to reduce it by changing their beliefs. Pratt (1964) considers utility functions, risk aversion and also risks considered as a proportion of total assets...

Words: 4442 - Pages: 18

Free Essay

Reviewer

...HISTORY AND THEORY STUDIES FIRST YEAR Terms 1 and 2 Course Lecturers: CHRISTOPHER PIERCE / BRETT STEELE (Term 1) Course Lecturer: PIER VITTORIO AURELI (Term 2) Course Tutor: MOLLIE CLAYPOOL Teaching Assistants: FABRIZIO BALLABIO SHUMI BOSE POL ESTEVE Course Structure The course runs for 3 hours per week on Tuesday mornings in Terms 1 and 2. There are four parallel seminar sessions. Each seminar session is divided into parts, discussion and submission development. Seminar 10.00-12.00 Mollie Claypool, Fabrizio Ballabio, Shumi Bose and Pol Esteve Lecture 12.00-13.00 Christopher Pierce, Brett Steele and Pier Vittorio Aureli Attendance Attendance is mandatory to both seminars and lectures. We expect students to attend all lectures and seminars. Attendance is tracked to both seminars and lectures and repeated absence has the potential to affect your final mark and the course tutor and undergraduate coordinator will be notified. Marking Marking framework adheres to a High Pass with Distinction, High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, Complete-toPass system. Poor attendance can affect this final mark. Course Materials Readings for each week are provided both online on the course website at aafirstyearhts.wordpress.com and on the course library bookshelf. Students are expected to read each assigned reading every week to be discussed in seminar. The password to access the course readings is “readings”. TERM 1: CANONICAL BUILDINGS, PROJECTS, TEXTS In this first term......

Words: 22588 - Pages: 91

Free Essay

Future of Gnss

...assess what they will be able to use the new system for. Key Words: GNSS, Galileo, RTK, GPS, Surveying Contents 1.0 Introduction 3 1.1 Image 1 – Galileo Constellation 3 2.0 Literature Review: 4 2.1 History: 4 2.2 Why we launch satellites: 4 2.3 What satellites do? 4 2.4 How do satellites and RTK work: 5 2.41 Diagram 1 – RTK Set Up 6 2.5 Current systems in place: 6 2.6 Problems with current systems: 7 2.7 Why is Europe launching Galileo? 7 2.8 How it will affect RTK surveying: 8 2.81 Combined GNSS Visibility including Galileo 9 3.0 Aims and Objectives: 10 4.0 Significance, Expected Outcomes & Benefits: 10 5.0 Methodology 11 5.1 Research design: 11 5.2 Data Collection Procedure: 11 5.3 Data Analysis: 11 6.0 Project Timeline 12 6.1 Table 1 – Project Timeline – Tasks and Week 12...

Words: 3575 - Pages: 15

Free Essay

Behavior of Finance

...Behavioural Finance Martin Sewell University of Cambridge February 2007 (revised April 2010) Abstract An introduction to behavioural finance, including a review of the major works and a summary of important heuristics. 1 Introduction Behavioural finance is the study of the influence of psychology on the behaviour of financial practitioners and the subsequent effect on markets. Behavioural finance is of interest because it helps explain why and how markets might be inefficient. For more information on behavioural finance, see Sewell (2001). 2 History Back in 1896, Gustave le Bon wrote The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind, one of the greatest and most influential books of social psychology ever written (le Bon 1896). Selden (1912) wrote Psychology of the Stock Market. He based the book ‘upon the belief that the movements of prices on the exchanges are dependent to a very considerable degree on the mental attitude of the investing and trading public’. In 1956 the US psychologist Leon Festinger introduced a new concept in social psychology: the theory of cognitive dissonance (Festinger, Riecken and Schachter 1956). When two simultaneously held cognitions are inconsistent, this will produce a state of cognitive dissonance. Because the experience of dissonance is unpleasant, the person will strive to reduce it by changing their beliefs. Pratt (1964) considers utility functions, risk aversion and also risks considered as a proportion of total assets. Tversky and......

Words: 4442 - Pages: 18

Premium Essay

Bibliographical Essay

...Research Notes and Comments A Bibliographical Essay on Decision Making IT has been said that administration is the critical organizational process, making possible production, procurement, and the rest; that leadership is the heart of administration; and that decision making is the key to leadership. Inherent in these statements are some remarkably accurate characterizations of current administrative theory. One thing they seem to imply is a coherence and a unity in administrative theory which do not seem to exist. When one attempts to assay the literature dealing with a concrete administrative process such as decision making, he discovers this. Divergent approaches to the study of decision making show that there are conflicting conceptions of its nature and function. And these probably are symptoms of a more fundamental conflict in contemporary administrative theory. Administration and leadership as foci for study have traditionally been the concern of historians, occasional novelists, and students of management, public and private. A generation ago these people had articulated a consistent, rather comprehensive conception of leadership, and especially administration. The Papers of Gulick and Urwick, for example, were regarded by many of us as a major conceptual achievement setting forth a twentieth-century theory of organization. Even as these ideas were gaining acceptance, however, the concepts that would replace them were emerging. After World War I, even before......

Words: 9240 - Pages: 37

Free Essay

Title Ix: Equity or Elimination?

...Title IX: Equity or Elimination? Issues of gender equity have confronted American society since its inception. The Declaration of Independence specifically states that all "men" are created equal, leaving out women, just as the Constitution originally denied women the right to vote. Over the past two and a half centuries, however, women have striven to obtain equal rights. In 1848, for instance, leaders of the women's suffrage movement, such as Susan B. Anthony, adopted a Declaration of Sentiments calling for an equal rights amendment including women ("Women's Rights" par. 1). In 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution finally adhered to their wishes, giving women the right to vote. Despite these important steps, women in the United States, a nation founded on the ideals of freedom and equality, continue to battle for equal rights. A key moment in this fight for equality occurred in 1972 with the passage of the Title IX Amendment to the Equal Opportunity in the Education Act. Title IX states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance" (Sadker par. 2). This piece of legislation has had a profound impact upon college athletics. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has interpreted Title IX as requiring an equal opportunity for male and female athletes at our...

Words: 1544 - Pages: 7