Case Analysisof Enron Corporation

In: Business and Management

Submitted By dimmukiel
Words 552
Pages 3
Name: Janet P. Cambangay Section & Year: BSBA-I
Teacher: Sir Zadrack B. Fiel Subject: Management 1
Time Session: 2:00pm-5:00pm 07/23/2011
Weekend Class

CASE STUDY
I. TIME CONTEXT
Regular Staff Meeting (TODAY)

II. VIEWPOINT
The different considerations being made by every section which results the 40% failure rate in selecting supervisors. In regards, with this, the department manager stabilizes that having a best technical people is just a trouble. It may only lead people to spend their time for technical works only which caused incompetency to manage. Second, is that the basis of seniority will only ignores everything learned about managing and it is unrealistic that the when the candidates get the job he will become capable and proficient in management.

III. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
The poor quality of the twenty supervisors reporting to the section heads due to poor record in selecting good supervisors.

IV. OBJECTIVES
* Supervisors must have a high standard in terms of their performances, knowledge and skills in business management.
* The promotion of supervisors must base with their capabilities and unique approach to their responsibilities in managing the business.
* An excellent supervisor must gain the skills in management, technical and conceptual skills of business supervision.

V. AREAS OF CONSIDERATION/ANALYSIS
In attaining the higher position it accompanied by attaining the higher responsibility. Being a supervisor is not only about knowledge, it’s not only about skills and it is not only about attitude but it should be all about knowledge and learning’s, skills and attitude in business management. Supervisory skills is not measured only for the span of time being engaged to the field but rather than the quality of worked done by the span of time you’ve been in the…...

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