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Case Study for Kodak

In: Business and Management

Submitted By lissymate
Words 1473
Pages 6
1101IBA- Management Concepts
Assessment 2: Report

Report on Strategic Management at Eastman Kodak

Prepared by:
Alisiya Bell
S2944536

Due Date:
Tuesday, 23 September 2014

Word count:
1426

Introduction:
Once a great leader and legendary brand in the photographic film industry, Eastman Kodak is now fighting to recover from a tech revolution that is strangling its core business. Kodak Chief Executive Antonio M. Perez is on the road to innovation. Taking in to consideration of the mistakes and lessons learnt from the past, Perez is reinventing the company’s core business model. As Perez reassembled the business he replaced a lot of executives to get the organisation on track. While Perez’s innovation of the organisation could be argued that this will help Kodak recover, there are also many substantial problems that could occur. One major problem for Kodak is the lack of strategic management. Although there are many various ways to define strategic management, David, F.R (2009) defines strategic management as a “continuous process of strategic analysis, strategy creation, implementation and monitoring, used by organisations with the purpose to achieve and maintain a competitive advantage.”

Problem Identification:
All main business ideas for Kodak seem to come just from the Chief Executive Perez. Leaving a lot of the main strategic planning just up to him. Kodak has previously displayed what an organisation with the absence of strategic management can look like. Therefor Perez should examine more heavily into strategic management as Kodak is always one step behind competitors. However, Strategic management is not about predicting the future but more so about preparing for it and acknowledging the steps the organisation may have to take to make a strategic plan in order to achieve a competitive advantage (Blatstein, I.M. 2012). With...

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