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Cassius V Brutus

In: English and Literature

Submitted By bonjournicole
Words 996
Pages 4
The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is a story of the short rise and fall of a ruler and the conspiracy linked to it. Julius Caesar is soon to be crown king of Rome after defeating military commander, Pompey. One of the close allies of Julius, Cassius fears of Rome being under rule of a man that in truth doesn’t like and wants to take him down. Cassius gathers others close to Julius to create this plan to bring Caesar down. Cassius tries hard to recruit one man who he believes would be perfect for the conspiracy: Marcus Brutus, a man who is known for the noble deeds of him and his ancestors. After much of a inner and outer strangle for Brutus to consider this, he goes along with the plan and then seems to over take most of Cassius’s position. The conspirators take Caesar to the capitol, where he is to be murdered, and Caesar utters the infamous words: “Et tu, Brute?”. The conspirators rejoice in the deed and are then later met with Antony as they finally agree to trust him. Antony, Caesar’s right hand man, is broken by the sight of Caesar’s dead body. When the conspirators leave to capitol, Brutus and Antony start to give their speeches and expose Caesar’s body. Brutus’s speech defends the conspirators and the murder and for a moment, he has won over the people. But, Antony’s dramatic speech overwhelms the civilians and now has them against the conspirators and this starts the civil war. It is a war for the power and fait of Rome where it is Antony and Octavius’s (Caesar’s nephew and would be heir) versus the army of Brutus and Cassius. And like all tragedies, ends with death of those of Brutus and Cassius. These two men, who fought bravely and closely, die together. While they both share the drive for the assassination, Brutus and Cassius couldn’t be any more different.
When comparing Brutus and Cassius, we see how their personalities and morals are very different....

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