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Catalog Version
Changes to the University Catalog are published on a periodic basis and reflect changes to policies and programs based on the decisions made by the University since the publication of the previous Catalog versions. The list below is a compilation of all published changes for each version of the 2015-2016 Catalog.
The previous version of the policy or program may be found in the archived PDF of the Kaplan University Catalog.

Revision Date:

Previous Catalog Version

March 2, 2016

2015-2016 Catalog (February 3, 2016)
(http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/documents/catalog-2-3-2016.pdf)

Revised Policy/Program

Previous Version
Page Number

Policy Information / University Information / Accreditation, Approvals, and Memberships

15

Policy Information / Admissions / Admissions Requirements

24

Policy Information / Admissions / First-Term Responsibilities

27

Policy Information / University Information / Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees

N/A

Policy Information / Academic Information / Academic Calendar

47

Undergraduate / Policy Information

61

Undergraduate / State-Specific Curricular Requirements

64

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Mission

70

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Accounting / Description and Outcomes

71

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Accounting / Policies

71

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Accounting / Degree Plan

73

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Business Administration / Description and Outcomes

93

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Business Administration / Policies

94

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Business Administration / Degree Plan

95

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Finance / Description and Outcomes

134

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Finance / Degree Plan

135

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

148

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Policies

149

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Degree Plan

150

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration / Description and Outcomes

176

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration / Degree Plan

177

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology / Policies

189

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology / Degree Plan

190

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / General Policies

208

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness / Description and Outcomes

210

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness / Degree Plan

211

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration / Description and Outcomes

214

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration / Degree Plan

216

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Description and Outcomes

219

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Policies

220

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Degree Plan

221

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Science / Description and Outcomes

225

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Science / Degree Plan

226

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science / Description and Outcomes

229

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science / Policies

229

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science / Degree Plan

231

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Nebraska) / Policies

239

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Online) / Policies

242

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management / Policies

246

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Transcription / Program Discontinued

250

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Science in Health Science / Degree Plan

253

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Onsite) / Policies

261

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Online) / Policies

264

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Description and Outcomes

269

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Policies

269

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) / Policies

292

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / General Policies

299

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Communication / Description and Outcomes

302

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Communication / Policies

302

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Communication / Degree Plan

303

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Description and Outcomes

306

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Degree Plan

306

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice / Description and Outcomes

311

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice / Degree Plan

313

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Description and Outcomes

340

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Degree Plan

341

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development / Policies

345

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management / Description and Outcomes

354

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management / Description and Outcomes

359

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management / Degree Plan

360

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Fire Science / Description and Outcomes

364

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Fire Science / Degree Plan

365

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Human Services / Description and Outcomes

369

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Human Services / Degree Plan

371

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies / Description and Outcomes

383

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies / Degree Plan

384

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies / Description and Outcomes

388

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies / Degree Plan

389

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Description and Outcomes

423

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Policies

424

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Degree Plan

425

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Description and Outcomes 429
Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Policies

430

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Degree Plan

431

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Description and
Outcomes

435

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Policies

435

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Degree Plan

437

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology / Description and
Outcomes

444

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development / Policies

447

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security / Description and Outcomes

463

Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / Discontinued Courses: CS 220, CS 290, CS 490, HI 252, HU 300, HW 410, NS 205, NS 210, PP 101, PP 489
299, PP 499, SC 300, SS 310
Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Courses: AB 104, CJ 110, CJ 180, CJ 433, CH 445, HI 135, HI 150, HI 230, HN 220, HN 300,
HN 330, HN 345, HN 347, HN 400, HN 430, HN 450, HS 140, HS 291, HU 250, IT 374, IT 410, IT 479, IT 484, IT 499, LS 481, LS 482, LS
483, LS 484, MT 359, MT 445, MT 450, PS 115, PS 340, PS 390, PS 410, PS 440, PU 120

489

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Mission

601

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Business Administration / Description and Outcomes

602

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Business Administration / Degree Plan

603

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Accounting / Description and Outcomes

612

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Accounting / Degree Plan

614

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Finance / Description and Outcomes

622

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Finance / Policies

622

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Finance / Degree Plan

624

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

627

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Information Technology / Degree Plan

628

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Management / Description and Outcomes

633

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Management / Degree Plan

635

Graduate / Graduate Education / General Policies

650

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Arts in Teaching / Policies

652

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Education / Description and Outcomes

658

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Education / Degree Plan

660

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology / Description and Outcomes

664

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology / Degree Plan

665

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Higher Education / Description and Outcomes

671

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Higher Education / Policies

672

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Higher Education / Degree Plan

673

Graduate / Health Sciences / General Policies

680

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Public Health / Policies

690

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Science in Health Education / Description and Outcomes

693

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Science in Health Education / Policies

693

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing / Description and Outcomes

706

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing / Policies

708

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path / Description and Outcomes

717

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path / Policies

719

Graduate / Nursing / Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Description and Outcomes

725

Graduate / Nursing / Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

725

Graduate / Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Description and Outcomes

732

Graduate / Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

732

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Public Administration / Description and Outcomes

740

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Public Administration / Policies

740

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Public Administration / Degree Plan

742

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Criminal Justice / Description and Outcomes

753

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Criminal Justice / Policies

753

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Criminal Justice / Degree Plan

755

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Human Services / Description and Outcomes

775

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Human Services /Degree Plan

777

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Legal Studies / Policies

779

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Psychology / Description and Outcomes

784

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Psychology / Degree Plan

788

Graduate / Course Descriptions / New Courses: ED 506, ED 526, ED 536, ED 546, ED 556, ED 557, ED 559, ED 566, ED 567, ED 568, ED
576, ED 579

808

Graduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Courses: ED 507, ED 580, GM 586, GM 591, GM 592, IT 511, IT 592, IX 540, MN 599, PS 526, PU 808
530
Concord Law School / Mission

891

Concord Law School / Policy Information / Technology Requirements and Acceptable Use

906

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Program Objectives

910

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Admissions

910

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Curriculum

911

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Policies / Academic Information Policies

912

Concord Law School / Executive Juris Doctor / Program Objectives

919

Concord Law School / Executive Juris Doctor / Curriculum

920

Concord Law School / Course Descriptions / New Course: Concord First

928

Concord Law School / Course Descriptions /Revised Courses: CL 7500, CL 8155

928

Concord Law School / Administration and Faculty / Administrators and Full-Time Faculty

940

Academic Leadership and Administration

950

February 3, 2016

2015-2016 Catalog (December 17, 2015)
(http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/documents/catalog-12-17-2015.pdf)

Revised Policy/Program
Policy Information / University Information / Accreditation, Approvals, and Memberships

Previous Version
Page Number
14

Policy Information / Admissions / Admissions Requirements

23

Policy Information / Prior Learning Assessment / Types of Credit

34

Undergraduate / Policy Information

61

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

148

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / General Policies

208

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology / Policies

235

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Online) / Policies

242

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management / Policies

246

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Online) / Policies

264

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Policies

269

Undergraduate / Nursing / General Policies

275

Undergraduate / Nursing / Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing / Policies

277

Undergraduate / Nursing / Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN / Policies

287

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) / Policies

292

Undergraduate / Nursing / Practical Nursing Diploma / Policies

296

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / General Policies

299

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Policies

340

Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Course: HI 255

489

Graduate / Policy Information

598

Graduate / Graduate Education / General Policies

650

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Arts in Teaching / Policies

653

Graduate / Graduate Education / Master of Science in Higher Education / Policies

672

Graduate / Health Sciences / General Policies

680

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Public Health / Policies

690

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Science in Health Education / Policies

693

Graduate / Nursing / General Policies

696

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing / Description and Outcomes

706

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing / Policies

708

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path / Description and Outcomes

717

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path / Policies

719

Graduate / Nursing / Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Description and Outcomes

725

Graduate / Nursing / Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

725

Graduate / Nursing / Executive Leader Graduate Certificate / Description and Outcomes

729

Graduate / Nursing / Executive Leader Graduate Certificate / Policies

729

Graduate / Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Description and Outcomes

732

Graduate / Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

732

Graduate / Nursing / Nurse Educator Graduate Certificate / Description and Outcomes

736

Graduate / Nursing / Nurse Educator Graduate Certificate / Policies

736

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / General Policies

739

Graduate / Course Descriptions / Discontinued Courses: GB 514, GB 515, GB 562, GB 564, GB 565

808

Graduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Courses: ED 507, ED 580

808

Open College at Kaplan University / Course Descriptions / Discontinued Course: EL 203

891

Open College at Kaplan University / Course Descriptions / New Course: EL 206

891

Concord Law School / Administration and Faculty / Administrators and Full-Time Faculty

941

December 17, 2015

2015-2016 Catalog (November 11, 2015)
(http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/documents/catalog-11-11-2015.pdf)

Revised Policy/Program

Previous Version
Page Number

Undergraduate / State-Specific Curricular Requirements

November 11, 2015

63

2015-2016 Catalog (August 26, 2015)
(http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/documents/catalog-8-26-2015.pdf)

Revised Policy/Program

Previous Version
Page Number

Policy Information / University Information / Accreditation, Approvals, and Memberships

11

Policy Information / University Information / Kaplan University History

11

Policy Information / Student Information and Services / Problem Resolution and Grievance Procedures

38

Undergraduate / State-Specific Curricular Requirements

61

Undergraduate / General Education / Outcomes and Requirements

63

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

147

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Bachelor of Science in Information Technology / Degree Plan

147

Undergraduate / Business and Information Technology / Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

184

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Description and Outcomes

214

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Policies

214

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Degree Plan

214

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management / Locations

214

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

226

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology / Policies

226

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology / Locations

226

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management / Description and Outcomes

238

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Onsite) / Description and Outcomes

253

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Onsite) / Policie

253

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Assistant Certificate (Online) / Policies

256

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Billing/Coding Certificate / Description and Outcomes

259

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Billing/Coding Certificate / Policies

259

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Billing/Coding Certificate / Degree Plan

259

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Health Sciences / Medical Office Administration Certificate / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Nursing / Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing / Description and Outcomes

266

Undergraduate / Nursing / Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN / Description and Outcomes

275

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Florida) / Discontinued Program

281

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) / Description and Outcomes

285

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) / Policies

285

Undergraduate / Nursing / Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) / Degree Plan

285

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / General Policies

293

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Corrections / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development / Description and Outcomes

329

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies / Description and Outcomes

379

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology / Description and Outcomes

388

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions /Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Description and Outcomes N/A
Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Description and
Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice / Description and Outcomes

406

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology / Description and
Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Human Services / Description and Outcomes

415

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies / Description and Outcomes

419

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Administration / Discontinued Program

422

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security / Description and Outcomes

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security / Policies

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security / Degree Plan

N/A

Undergraduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security / Locations

N/A

Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / Discontinued Courses: HW 215, LS 493, MR 270, MR 275, MR 290, NU 103, NU 106, NU 112, NU
113, NU 124, NU 224, NU 243, NU 261

447

Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Courses: CE 100, CE 340, CS 113, HI 255, HI 499, HN 300, HS 305, HS 312, IT 247, IT 299,
IT 375, IT 388, MO 290, MT 355, MT 357, MT 358, MT 453, MT 454, MT 455, MT 459, MT 475, NU 104, NU 107, NU 122, NU 132, NU
242, NU 300, NU 310, NU 450, NY 496, NU 496ME, PS 115, PS 345, SC 156, SS 360

447

Undergraduate / Course Descriptions / New Courses: AB 140M1, AB 140M2, AB 140M3, AB 140M4, AB 140M5, AB 217M1, AB 217M2,
N/A
AB 217M3, AB 217M4, AB 217M5, AB 219M1, AB 219M2, AB 219M3, AB 219M4, AB 219M5, CE 370, CE 371, CE 401, CE 402, CE 490,
CJ 100, CJ 103, CJ 110, CJ 126, CJ 156, CJ 180, CJ 200, CJ 255, CJ 266, CJ 289, CJ 297, CJ 352, CJ 435, CJ 455, CJ 492, CS 113M1, CS
113M2, CS 113M3, CS 113M4, CS 113M5, HI 253, LS 185, LS 204, LS 298, LS 495, MT 203M1, MT 203M2, MT 203M3, MT 203M4, MT
203M5, PS 215, PS 311, PS 497, PS 498
Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Cybersecurity Management / Description and Outcomes

572

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Master of Science in Information Technology / Description and Outcomes

580

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Graduate Certificate in Accounting / Description and Outcomes

595

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Graduate Certificate in Human Resources / Description and Outcomes

597

Graduate / Business and Information Technology / Graduate Certificate in Project Management / Description and Outcomes

601

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Health Informatics / Policies

637

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Health Informatics / Locations

637

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Health Information Management / Policies

639

Graduate / Health Sciences / Master of Health Information Management / Locations

639

Graduate / Nursing / General Policies

647

Graduate / Nursing / Doctor of Nursing Practice / Policies

649

Graduate / Nursing / Doctor of Nursing Practice / Degree Plan

649

Graduate / Nursing / Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path / Policies

668

Graduate / Nursing / Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

676

Graduate / Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate / Policies

683

Graduate / Social and Behavioral Sciences / Master of Science in Psychology / Policies

735

Graduate / Course Descriptions / Discontinued Courses: IX 564, NS 600

759

Graduate / Course Descriptions / Revised Courses: AC 502, ED 522, ET 503, GB 531, GB 570, GF 580, GF 591, GM 506, GM 594, HE 511, IT 759
503, IT 504, IT 523, IT 530, IX 520, IX 550, MN 519, MN 520, MN 534, MN 605, PP 510, PU 550, PU 699
Graduate / Course Descriptions / New Courses: EM 504

N/A

Open College at Kaplan University / General Policies

837

Concord Law School / Overview

844

Concord Law School / Policy Information / Attendance and Related Policies

846

Concord Law School / Policy Information / Student Services

847

Concord Law School / Policy Information / Petition and Report and Complaint Procedures

857

Concord Law School / Policy Information / Tuition and Fees

862

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Admissions

864

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Curriculum

865

Concord Law School / Juris Doctor / Policies / Transfer Credit

866

Concord Law School / Executive Juris Doctor / Admissions

874

Concord Law School / Executive Juris Doctor / Curriculum

875

Concord Law School / Master of Laws / Discontinued Program

883

Concord Law School / Course Description / Discontinued Courses: CL 9110, CL 9115, CL 9120, CL 9125, CL 9130, CL 9135, CL 9140, CL
9145, CL 9150, CL 9155, CL 9160, CL 9165, CL 9170, CL 9180, CL 9185

889

Concord Law School / Course Policies

902

Academic Leadership and Administration

917

Contact Information / Kaplan University

921

Table of Contents
Letter From the Provost
Policy Information
University Information
Kaplan University Mission, Purpose, and Philosophy ......................................................................................................................................................................18
Kaplan University History ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 19
Accreditation, Approvals, and Memberships .................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Library ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 27
Statement of Assessment ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Admissions
Admissions Requirements ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................28
International Applicants ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
Entrance Examinations and Foundational Coursework .....................................................................................................................................................................31
Conditional Admission .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................31
First-Term Responsibilities ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 31
Technology Requirements ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................32
Nondiscrimination Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................32
Term Registration
Registration .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................36
Attendance .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37
Leave of Absence and Withdrawal ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37
Repeated Courses ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 38
Prior Learning Assessment
General Guidelines ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 39
Types of Credit .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 39
Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees .................................................................................................................................................................................. 40
Student Information and Services
Academic Freedoms and Student Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................................................................41
Student Conduct ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 41
Disciplinary Actions, Suspensions, and Dismissals .......................................................................................................................................................................... 44
Problem Resolution and Grievance Procedures ................................................................................................................................................................................ 45
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) .....................................................................................................................................................................48
Directory Information Public Notice ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 48
University Services ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 49
Campus-Specific Information ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 49
Academic Information
Academic Calendar ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 51
Definition of a Unit of Credit ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Program Changes ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 52
Transcripts, Certifications, and Transfer of Kaplan University Credits ........................................................................................................................................... 52
Academic Standards
Academic Grades and Marks .............................................................................................................................................................................................................53
Honors and Awards ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................55
Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
Academic Integrity Policy ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 56
Academic Appeals Policy .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 58
Financial Information
Enrollment Status and Definition of an Academic Year .................................................................................................................................................................. 59
Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 59
Financial Aid Services ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 60
Refund Policy .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................61
Scholarships ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................64

12

Undergraduate
Undergraduate Programs ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 65
Policy Information ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................66
State-Specific Curricular Requirements ..................................................................................................................................................................................................68
School of General Education
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 70
Outcomes and Requirements ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 70
Professional Competencies .................................................................................................................................................................................................................73
General Education Mobile (GEM) Program ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 73
School of Business and Information Technology
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 74
General Policies ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................74
Bachelor of Science in Accounting ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 75
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration .............................................................................................................................................................................. 86
Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 120
Bachelor of Science in Finance .......................................................................................................................................................................................................123
Bachelor of Science in Information Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................ 137
Associate of Applied Science in Accounting ..................................................................................................................................................................................150
Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration ............................................................................................................................................................. 152
Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology ............................................................................................................................................................. 164
Cisco Networks Postbaccalaureate Certificate ................................................................................................................................................................................ 168
Computer Forensics Postbaccalaureate Certificate ..........................................................................................................................................................................170
Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate .............................................................................................................................................................................172
Information Security Postbaccalaureate Certificate .........................................................................................................................................................................174
Microsoft Operating Systems Postbaccalaureate Certificate ...........................................................................................................................................................176
Multiplatform Software Development Postbaccalaureate Certificate ............................................................................................................................................. 178
Oracle Database Administration Postbaccalaureate Certificate ...................................................................................................................................................... 180
School of Health Sciences
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 182
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................182
Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness .................................................................................................................................................................................. 184
Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration .......................................................................................................................................................................186
Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management ...............................................................................................................................................................188
Bachelor of Science in Health Science ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 192
Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 194
Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology ................................................................................................................................................. 197
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Nebraska) .............................................................................................................200
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Online) .........................................................................................................................................................203
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management ...................................................................................................................................................... 207
Associate of Science in Health Science .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 210
Dental Assistant Diploma ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 215
Medical Assistant Certificate (Onsite) .............................................................................................................................................................................................217
Medical Assistant Certificate (Online) ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 220
Medical Billing/Coding Certificate ..................................................................................................................................................................................................223
Medical Office Administration Certificate ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 225
Phlebotomist Certificate ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 228
School of Nursing
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 231
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................231
Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing ..................................................................................................................................................................................233
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN ................................................................................................................................................................................242
Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska) .................................................................................................................................................................. 247
Practical Nursing Diploma ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................251
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 254
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................254
Bachelor of Science in Communication ..........................................................................................................................................................................................257
Bachelor of Science in Corrections ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 260
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 263

13

Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration ................................................................................................................................................................276
Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development .................................................................................................................................................................. 279
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management ....................................................................................................................................................285
Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management .............................................................................................................................................................288
Bachelor of Science in Fire Science ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 291
Bachelor of Science in Human Services ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 294
Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 302
Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 305
Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies ........................................................................................................................................................................................310
Bachelor of Science in Political Science .........................................................................................................................................................................................313
Bachelor of Science in Psychology ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 315
Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions ..........................................................................................................................................................................325
Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis ................................................................................................................................................329
Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology ................................................................................................................................333
Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice .......................................................................................................................................................................... 337
Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology ..............................................................................................................................................339
Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development ................................................................................................................................................... 341
Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science ................................................................................................................................................................................ 343
Associate of Applied Science in Human Services ..........................................................................................................................................................................345
Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services ........................................................................................................................................................348
Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies .........................................................................................................................................................................350
Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security ......................................................................................................................................................... 352
Applied Behavior Analysis Postbaccalaureate Certificate .............................................................................................................................................................. 354
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) Postbaccalaureate Certificate ................................................................................................................................................357
Corrections Certificate ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 359
Crime Scene Technician Certificate ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 361
Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services .............................................................................................................................................................363
Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services ....................................................................................................................................................................... 365
Legal Secretary Certificate .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 367
Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice ........................................................................................................................................................369
Pathway to Paralegal Postbaccalaureate Certificate ........................................................................................................................................................................371
Private Security Certificate .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 373
Course Descriptions
Business and Information Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 375
General Education ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 403
Health Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 413
Nursing ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 430
Social and Behavioral Sciences ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 442

Graduate
Graduate Programs ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 481
Policy Information .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................482
School of General Education
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 484
Professional Competencies ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................484
School of Business and Information Technology
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 485
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................485
Master of Business Administration ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 486
Master of Science in Accounting .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 495
Master of Science in Cybersecurity Management ...........................................................................................................................................................................501
Master of Science in Finance .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 503
Master of Science in Information Technology ................................................................................................................................................................................507
Master of Science in Management .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 512
Graduate Certificate in Accounting ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 520
Graduate Certificate in Human Resources ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 522
Graduate Certificate in Information Security .................................................................................................................................................................................. 524
Graduate Certificate in Project Management .................................................................................................................................................................................. 526
School of Education in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 528

14

General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................528
Master of Arts in Teaching ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 530
Master of Science in Education .......................................................................................................................................................................................................536
Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology ........................................................................................................................................................... 541
Master of Science in Educational Psychology ................................................................................................................................................................................ 544
Master of Science in Higher Education .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 546
School of Health Sciences
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 555
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................555
Master of Health Care Administration ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 556
Master of Health Informatics ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................558
Master of Health Information Management .................................................................................................................................................................................... 560
Master of Public Health ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................562
Master of Science in Health Education ...........................................................................................................................................................................................565
School of Nursing
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 568
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................568
Doctor of Nursing Practice .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 570
Master of Science in Nursing .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 578
Master of Science in Nursing—DNP Path ......................................................................................................................................................................................588
Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certificate ...........................................................................................................................................................................596
Executive Leader Graduate Certificate ............................................................................................................................................................................................600
Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate ..............................................................................................................................................................................................603
Nurse Educator Graduate Certificate ...............................................................................................................................................................................................607
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 610
General Policies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................610
Master of Public Administration ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 611
Master of Science in Criminal Justice .............................................................................................................................................................................................623
Master of Science in Environmental Policy ....................................................................................................................................................................................635
Master of Science in Homeland Security and Emergency Management ........................................................................................................................................639
Master of Science in Human Services ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 642
Master of Science in Legal Studies .................................................................................................................................................................................................646
Master of Science in Psychology .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 650
Graduate Certificate in Addictions .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 666
Graduate Certificate in Industrial/Organizational Psychology ........................................................................................................................................................668
Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis ..................................................................................................................................................................670
Course Descriptions
Business and Information Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 673
Education .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 689
General Education ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 705
Health Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 706
Nursing ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 713
Social and Behavioral Sciences ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 727

School of Professional and Continuing Education
Mission ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................748
General Information .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 749

Open College at Kaplan University
Mission ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................751
General Policies .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................752
Undergraduate
Bachelor of Science in Professional Studies ...................................................................................................................................................................................755

15

Course Descriptions ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................757

Concord Law School
Mission ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................758
Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................759
Policy Information
Attendance and Related Policies ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 761
Student Services ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 762
Student Groups ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 764
Financial Aid Services ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 764
Academic Records/Privacy Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................................................764
Student Conduct and Honor Code ...................................................................................................................................................................................................766
Statement of Nondiscrimination ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 770
Petition and Report and Complaint Procedures .............................................................................................................................................................................. 771
Technology Requirements and Acceptable Use ..............................................................................................................................................................................773
Tuition and Fees ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................776
Juris Doctor
Program Objectives .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 777
Admissions ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 777
Curriculum ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................778
Policies ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................779
Cancellation and Refund Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 786
Executive Juris Doctor
Program Objectives .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 787
Admissions ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 787
Curriculum ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................788
Policies ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................793
Cancellation and Refund Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 798
Course Descriptions
Courses in Partnership with Other Law Schools ............................................................................................................................................................................ 800
JD and EJD (CL) ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 800
EJD Courses in Partnership with Kaplan University ......................................................................................................................................................................809
Course Policies ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 812
Administration and Faculty
Administrators and Full-Time Faculty ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 813
Adjunct Faculty ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 816
Visiting and Supplementary Lecturers ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 821

Academic Leadership and Administration
Academic Leadership and Administration ............................................................................................................................................................................................823

Contact Information
Kaplan University ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................827
Ownership .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 831

16

Letter From the Provost
Dear Student:
Welcome to Kaplan University.
For over 75 years, Kaplan University has been serving students just like you who are juggling work and family responsibilities while pursuing their education. Our mission is to help you launch, enhance, or change your career. You have had the courage to take the most challenging step— getting started. We are here to support you through your entire journey.
Kaplan University’s outcome-focused programs are designed to provide you with what you need—the knowledge and skills that employers want. Here you can learn in a modality that is right for you: online, on campus, or a combination of the two. Faculty members are leaders in their academic fields who practice what they teach and are dedicated to sharing their professional knowledge. Our diverse student body, which includes individuals from every region of the United States and many countries around the world, provides you with the opportunity to learn from these various perspectives.
As you embark on your studies, refer to the University Catalog for official policy, course, and program information. Policy information is intuitively categorized at the university, degree, school, and program levels. Quickly navigate to your program of interest using the “Find a
Program” search on the home page. Throughout the site, refer to the right column for links to important documents and websites. In addition, course descriptions are searchable and available for quick reference within the published degree plans.
At Kaplan University, we are committed to the idea that learning is a lifelong process. Congratulations on taking the first step on your path to a lifetime of personal and academic growth.
Sincerely,
Dr. Betty Vandenbosch
President and Provost, Kaplan University

17

Policy Information
University Information
In this section, you can find information on the University's mission, purpose, and philosophy; history; and accreditation and memberships. A description of the University's library and assessment plan are also featured.

Faculty
Click on the links below to view faculty rosters.


College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/
Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_ArtsSciences.pdf)



School of Business and Information Technology Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/documents/
KU_Faculty_Roster_Bus_IT.pdf)



School of General Education Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_GenEd.pdf)



School of Education Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_Education.pdf)



School of Health Sciences Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_Health_Sciences.pdf)



School of Nursing Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_Nursing.pdf)



Kaplan University Learning Centers Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Kaplan_University_Faculty_Roster_KULC.pdf )



Hagerstown Campus Faculty Roster (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/hagerstown-maryland/faculty-roster.pdf)

Kaplan University Mission, Purpose, and Philosophy
University Mission
Kaplan University is an institution of higher learning dedicated to providing innovative undergraduate, graduate, and continuing professional education. Our programs foster student learning with opportunities to launch, enhance, or change careers in a diverse global society. The
University is committed to general education, a student-centered service and support approach, and applied scholarship in a practical environment. University Purposes
To accomplish its mission, Kaplan University has established the following purposes:
1. Provide academic programs that have been developed and assessed by faculty, staff, and members of educational, professional, and business communities.
2. Provide intensive and comprehensive instruction using both onsite and online modes of delivery that strengthens student academic achievement. 3. Instill in its students the value of lifelong learning by stimulating intellectual curiosity, creative and critical thinking, and awareness of culture and diversity.
4. Plan and provide facilities and resources that respond to the needs of students, faculty, and staff.
5. Assist students in developing professional attitudes, values, skills, and strategies that foster success in their careers and in life.
6. Prepare students to meet the ever-changing needs of their communities now and in the future.

18

University Philosophy
Kaplan University recognizes the worth and dignity of all people and is sensitive to the diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds represented in its student population. All students are encouraged to reach their potential within the framework of their individual needs, interests, and capabilities. The University employs instructional methods based on adult learning theory and is committed to the development of each student's intellectual, analytical, and critical thinking abilities. Teaching techniques encourage active student participation and may include group discussions and projects, laboratory work, simulations, demonstrations, field trips, guest speakers, and lectures. A strong emphasis is placed on ethics, accountability, professionalism, and the individual's commitment to pursuing lifelong personal and professional development.
The University helps students reach their educational goals by providing them with the communication skills necessary to work successfully with clients and other professionals, offering courses that prepare them to successfully participate in society, equipping them with the business knowledge necessary to succeed in the "real world," and encouraging them to become involved in professional organizations that will promote their learning and professional skills.
The University is committed to serving the public good. We engage in continuous efforts to increase college attainment of high-risk populations and help students achieve economic independence through higher education and employment. We address skill gaps that hinder economic development, help military personnel effectively transition to civilian life, reduce the cost of higher education for our students and society, incorporate public service in learning activities, and encourage and support faculty scholarship. We model public service to promote and encourage charitable activities and volunteerism among our faculty, staff, and students.

Kaplan University History
American Institute of Commerce (AIC) was founded in 1937. AIC was purchased by Quest Education Corp. in November 1998, and in April
2000 changed its name to Quest College. Quest Education Corp. was purchased in July 2000 by Kaplan, Inc. In November 2000, the name Quest
College was changed to Kaplan College. In 2004, Kaplan College expanded its academic offerings to include master's-level programs and became
Kaplan University.
In 2007, the Hamilton College campuses located in Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Lincoln, Mason City, and Omaha became branch campuses of Kaplan University.
In 2009, the Hagerstown campus, formerly a Kaplan College campus, became a branch campus of Kaplan University.
In 2010, both the Lewiston and South Portland campuses of Andover College became branch campuses of Kaplan University.
In 2013, the Augusta campus was added as a branch campus of Kaplan University.
Concord Law School was founded in 1998 as the nation's first wholly online law school and one of Kaplan, Inc.'s first efforts in the area of higher education. Concord formally merged with Kaplan University in 2007. Concord Law School was accredited by the Distance Education
Accrediting Commission (DEAC), formerly the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC) from 2000 until it voluntarily resigned this accreditation effective December 15, 2015.

Accreditation, Approvals, and Memberships
Kaplan University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission (HLC). For more information, visit their website at hlcommission.org. Use the links under "Contact Us" to reach the Commission.

Program and School Accreditation and Approvals
Additional approvals and program and school accreditation are noted under each area of study.

Concord Law School
Concord Law School is authorized to operate as a degree-granting institution in the state of California and is registered as an unaccredited law school in the distance learning category with the California Committee of Bar Examiners:
180 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
Tel: 415.538.2000
Website: www.calbar.ca.gov

19

Concord's unique method of delivering its program—utilizing the Internet without a fixed classroom facility—places it in the "distance learning" category under California law. The California Committee of Bar Examiners registers distance learning schools, and if study is completed in conformance with Title IV, Division 1 of the Rules of the State Bar of California (Admission Rules) and all other requirements are met, graduates of the Juris Doctor program are eligible to sit for the California Bar Examination.
Concord Law School received initial affirmation of accreditation by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC), formerly the
Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC), in 2000 and its most recent reaffirmation of accreditation in 2010. The Distance Education Accrediting Commission is listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency. Concord voluntarily resigned this accreditation effective December 15, 2015.
Concord’s degree-granting authority in connection with its students qualifying to take the California Bar Examination and obtaining admission to the practice of law in California (Juris Doctor Program) is based on its registration as an unaccredited law school with the Committee of Bar
Examiners.

School of Business and Information Technology
Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs
Kaplan University's School of Business and Information Technology has received programmatic accreditation from the Accreditation Council for
Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) for the following programs:
Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration
Bachelor of Science in Accounting
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Master of Business Administration
Master of Science in Accounting
Master of Science in Management
ACBSP promotes continuous improvement and recognizes excellence in the accreditation of business education programs around the world.
Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs
11520 West 119th Street
Overland Park , KS 66213
Tel: 913.339.9356
Fax: 913.339.6226
Website: www.acbsp.org
Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards
Kaplan University's Master of Science in Finance with a concentration in financial planning is a CFP Board-Registered Program in financial planning education. The Master of Science in Finance with a concentration in financial planning meets the specific criteria for educating individuals who wish to fulfill the education component for obtaining CFP(R) certification.
Individuals who meet CFP Board's education requirement are eligible to sit for the CFP(R) Certification Examination. Successful completion of the education and examination components completes two of the core prerequisites to obtain CFP(R) certification.
Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP(R), Certified Financial Planner™, and federally registered
CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. The Society for Human Resource Management
The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has acknowledged that the following programs fully align with SHRM’s HR Curriculum
Guidebook and Templates:
Master of Science in Management with a concentration in human resources
Master of Business Administration with a concentration in human resources
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in human resources
The HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates were developed by SHRM to define the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by
HR students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The guidelines—created in 2006 and revalidated in 2010 and 2013—are part of SHRM’s academic initiative to define HR education standards taught in university business schools and help universities develop degree programs that follow these standards.
Project Management Institute General Accreditation Center Accreditation

20

The Project Management Institute Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Education Programs (GAC) has granted accreditation to the following Kaplan University School of Business graduate programs:
Master of Business Administration with a concentration in project management
Master of Science in Management with a concentration in project management

School of Education
The Iowa certification track of the Master of Arts in Teaching program is approved by the Iowa State Board of Education for the secondary teaching concentration area:
Grimes State Office Building
400 East 14th Street
Des Moines, IA 50319-0146
Tel: 515.281.5296

School of Health Sciences
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
The Medical Assistant Certificate program offered on campus in Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Davenport, and Des Moines, Iowa, and in the states of Maine, Maryland, and Nebraska is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB):
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health
Education Programs
1361 Park Street
Clearwater, FL 33756
Tel: 727.210.2350
Website: www.caahep.org
The campuses in Iowa, Maine, Maryland, and Nebraska transferred accreditation from the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting to the Medical Assistant Certificate on September 24, 2015. The campus in Hagerstown, Maryland, voluntarily withdrew accreditation for the
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting in May 2015. All students currently enrolled in the associate’s degree program will graduate from the CAAHEP-accredited program. The campus in Mason City, Iowa, voluntarily withdrew accreditation for the certificate program in
February 2016. All students currently enrolled in the associate’s degree or certificate program will graduate from a CAAHEP-accredited program
.
Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education
The Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology program offered online is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). CAHIIM can be contacted at:
223 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 2150
Chicago, IL 60601
Tel: 312.233.1100
Website: www.cahiim.org
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
The Phlebotomy Certificate program offered onsite in Hagerstown is approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory
Sciences (NAACLS):
5600 North River Road, Suite 720
Rosemont, IL 60018
Tel: 773.714.8880
Commission on Dental Accreditation
The Dental Assistant Diploma program offered onsite in Omaha is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and has been granted the accreditation status of Approval (without reporting requirements). The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the U.S.
Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at: 312.440.4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago,
IL 60611-2678. The Commission’s web address is: www.ada.org/en/coda.

School of Nursing
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)

21

The online Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program, the Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program offered in Maine, and the online Master of Science in Nursing program are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE):
One DuPont Circle, NW, Suite 530
Washington, DC 20036
Tel: 202.887.6791
Iowa Board of Nursing
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN and the Master of Science in Nursing programs offered online and the Associate of Science in Nursing program offered onsite in Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, and Des Moines are approved by the Iowa Board of Nursing. The Doctor of
Nursing Practice program offered online have received interim approval:
Iowa Board of Nursing
400 SW 8th Street, Suite B
Des Moines, IA 50309-4685
Tel: 515.281.3255
Maine State Board of Nursing
The Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program offered onsite in Augusta is granted initial approval by the Maine State Board of
Nursing:
161 Capitol Street
158 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0158
Tel: 207.287.1133
Nebraska Board of Nursing and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
The Practical Nursing Diploma program and the Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program offered onsite in Omaha are approved by the Nebraska Board of Nursing and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. The Associate of Science in Nursing program offered onsite in Lincoln is approved by the Nebraska Board of Nursing and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. The
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services can be contacted at:
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
Regulation and Licensure
P.O. Box 95007
Lincoln, NE 68509-5007

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Behavior Analyst Certification Board
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board(R), Inc. (BACB(R)) has approved the Kaplan University course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst(R) Examination and the Board Certified Behavior Analyst(R)
Examination.
To become certified, you will need to obtain the necessary number of hours of field experience under an appropriate supervisor, as required by the BACB, meet additional degree and practicum requirements, and must also pass the comprehensive BACB exam. BACB can be contacted at:
Behavior Analyst Certification Board
8051 Shaffer Parkway
Littleton, CO 80127
Tel: 720.438.4321
Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education
Kaplan University is recognized by the U.S. Fire Administration as an official Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education institution:
16825 South Seton Avenue
Emmitsburg, MD 21727
Tel: 301.447.1000
Fax: 301.447.1346
Website: www.usfa.fema.gov
International Fire Service Accreditation Congress
Kaplan University's College of Social and Behavioral Sciences has received programmatic accreditation from the International Fire Service
Accreditation Congress (IFSAC) for the following programs:
Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science
Bachelor of Science in Fire Science

22

International Fire Service Accreditation Congress
IFSAC Administrative Office
1812 Tyler Avenue
Stillwater, OK 74078

State Approvals
Additional state approvals are noted below.

Alabama
Kaplan University has been granted a Certificate of Approval by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education.
State authorization to provide a program related to the preparation of teachers or other P-12 school/system personnel does not indicate eligibility for an Alabama certificate. Applicants for an Alabama certificate based on reciprocity must meet Alabama's test requirements and submit a valid, renewable professional educator certificate/license issued by another state at the degree level, grade level, and in the teaching field or area of instructional support for which an Alabama certificate is sought and for which Alabama issues a certificate. Applicants for Alabama certification in an area of administration must also document at least 3 years of full-time employment as an administrator in a P-12 school system(s).
Website: www.alsde.edu

Alaska
Kaplan University is exempt from authorization in Alaska under AS 14.48 and 20 AAC 17.015 because it offers programs online and does not have a physical presence in the state.

Arkansas
Kaplan University is certified to offer online degree programs by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Arkansas Higher
Education Coordinating Board certification does not constitute an endorsement of any institution or program. Such certification merely indicates that certain criteria have been met as required under the rules and regulations implementing institutional and program certification as defined in
Arkansas Code 6-61-301.

Florida
Kaplan University is licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, license number 3296. Additional information regarding the
University may be obtained by contacting the Commission:
325 West Gaines Street, Suite 1414
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
Tel: 888.224.6684 (Toll Free)

Illinois


Kaplan University has operating authority granted by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. Additional information regarding the
University may be obtained by contacting the Board:
431 East Adams, 2nd Floor
Springfield, IL 62701
Tel: 217.782.2551



Kaplan University is approved by the Illinois Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Indiana
Kaplan University is regulated by the Indiana Board for Proprietary Education:
The Indiana Board for Proprietary Education
Indiana Commission for Higher Education
101 West Ohio Street, Suite 670
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Tel: 800.227.5695 (Toll Free)
Tel: 317.232.1320

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Iowa


Kaplan University is authorized by the Iowa College Student Aid Commission:
Iowa College Student Aid Commission
430 East Grand Avenue
3rd Floor
Des Moines, IA 50309
Tel:877.272.4456, option 4 (Toll Free)
Online Student Complaint Form: https://www.iowacollegeaid.gov/content/constituent-request-review
Qualified students of the University are eligible to receive Iowa state tuition grants.



Kaplan University is approved by the Iowa Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Iowa Private Industry Area Council.

Kansas
Kaplan University is approved by the Kansas Board of Regents:
Kansas Board of Regents
1000 SW Jackson Street, Suite 520
Topeka, KS 66612-1368
Tel: 785.296.3421
Fax: 785.296.0983
Website: www.kansasregents.org

Kentucky
Kaplan University is licensed by the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education. Additional information regarding the University may be obtained by contacting the Council:
1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320
Frankfort, KY 40601
Tel: 502.573.1555
Fax: 502.573.1535
Website: www.cpe.ky.gov
Note: The Master of Science in Higher Education degree is not recognized for rank change for K-12 teachers in Kentucky.

Louisiana
Kaplan University is currently licensed by the Board of Regents of the State of Louisiana. Licenses are renewed by the State Board of Regents every 2 years. Licensed institutions have met minimal operational standards set forth by the state, but licensure does not constitute accreditation, guarantee the transferability of credit, or signify that programs are certifiable by any professional agency or organization.

Maine
The Augusta, Lewiston, and South Portland campuses are approved by the state of Maine to offer the following degrees, which are authorized by the state of Maine legislature:


Associate's degrees in accounting, business administration, criminal justice, early childhood development, information technology, medical assisting, and paralegal studies



Bachelor's degrees in business administration, criminal justice, early childhood development, information technology, and nursing

Maryland
The Hagerstown campus is approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission as a coeducational, nonpublic institution of higher education offering bachelor's and associate's degrees and certificate programs. Kaplan University is registered with the Maryland Higher
Education Commission to enroll Maryland students in its fully online programs.
Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC)
6 North Liberty Street, 10th Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
Tel: 410.260.4500

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Minnesota
Kaplan University is registered with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the University. Credits earned at the University may not transfer to all other institutions.
Minnesota Office of Higher Education
1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350
St. Paul, MN 55108-5227

Missouri
Kaplan University is certified to operate by the Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education:
3515 Amazonas Drive
Jefferson City, MO 65109
Tel: 573.751.2361
Website: www.dhe.mo.gov

Nebraska
Kaplan University is authorized by Nebraska's Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education. Additional information regarding the
University may be obtained by contacting the Commission:
140 North 8th Street, Suite 300
Lincoln, NE 68509-5005
Tel: 402.471.2847

Nevada
Kaplan University is licensed to operate by the Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education (CPE) to offer degree programs containing an experiential or clinical component. The state does not require licensing of online programs that do not contain an experiential/clinical component.
CPE renews licenses every 2 years.
Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education
3663 East Sunset Road, Suite 202
Las Vegas, NV 89120
Tel: 702.486.7330
Fax: 702.486.7340

New Mexico
Kaplan University has applied for licensure. Its approval is pending.
New Mexico Higher Education Department
2048 Galisteo Street
Santa Fe, NM 87505-2100
Tel: 505.476.8400
Fax: 505.476.8453
Website: www.hed.state.nm.us

Tennessee
Kaplan University is authorized by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. This authorization must be renewed each year and is based on an evaluation by minimum standards concerning quality of education, ethical business practices, health and safety, and fiscal responsibility. Any grievances not resolved at the institutional level may be forwarded to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission:
404 James Robertson Parkway, Suite 1900
Nashville, TN 37243-0830
Tel: 615.741.5293
Specific School of Education master's degrees are not recognized for initial licensure in Tennessee and cannot be used to add endorsement areas to a Tennessee license. Prior to enrolling, you are strongly encouraged to confirm salary rating and license renewal policies with their school district and/or state department, when applicable.

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Benefits for Tennessee K-12 teachers enrolled in the Master of Science in Education or the Master of Science in Education's educational leadership concentration include:


Salary increase and/or licensure renewal*



Career advancement, i.e., those completing the educational leadership emphasis area may gain the necessary leadership knowledge and skills to be eligible for a department chair or other nonlicensure administrative role

Benefits for career changers enrolled in the Master of Arts in Teaching's noncertification track include:


Increased confidence in the classroom while working with adolescents in current role



Greater preparation for state pedagogy exams and state-approved certification programs



Salary increase*

Benefits of the Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology include:


Entry into a career as an instructional designer or instructional technologist



Ability to fine-tune skills related to design, development, and evaluation of instructional programs, materials, and media

*Please check with your school district and/or the Tennessee Department of Education prior to enrollment.

Texas
Kaplan University is authorized by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board:
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
1200 East Anderson Lane
Austin, TX 78711
Tel: 512.427.6200

Washington
Kaplan University is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree-granting institutions under the Degree-Granting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes Kaplan University to offer field placement components for specific degree programs. The WSAC may be contacted for a list of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the WSAC does not carry with it an endorsement by the Council of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the Act or the applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the council at:
P.O. Box 43430
Olympia, WA 98504-3430

West Virginia
Kaplan University is registered with the West Virginia Community and Technical College System.
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
West Virginia Community and Technical College System
1018 Kanawha Boulevard East, Suite 700
Charleston, WV 25301

Wisconsin
Kaplan University is authorized by the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board. Any questions or concerns about Kaplan University that have not been satisfactorily answered or resolved by the University should be directed to the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board:
210 West Washington Avenue, 3rd Floor
Madison, WI 53703
Tel: 608.266.1996
Website: www.eab.state.wi.us

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Memberships


The Associate of Applied Science in Human Services program and the Bachelor of Science in Human Services program are members of the Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE). The CSHSE can be contacted at:
Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE)
1935 South Plum Grove Road
PMB 297
Palatine, IL 60067



Kaplan University is a member of the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities:
1101 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20036
Tel: 202.336.6700

Additional Approvals


Kaplan University is a licensed testing center for the Travel Institute. Tests are offered at select University locations.



Kaplan University has SAA approval (state specific) for many of its programs open to enrollment for those eligible to receive Veteran
Educational Benefits.



Kaplan University is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant, alien students.



Kaplan University programs are recognized by the following agencies and federal laws:

Dislocated Workers Center


Iowa Workforce Development Center



Job Training Partnership Act



Vocational Rehabilitation Services



Work Incentive Act

Library
As a student enrolled in one of the University's educational delivery systems, you are assured access to educational resources and services. The
Kaplan University Online Library maintains and develops information resources and services that support the education goals of students, faculty, and staff. Through the Kaplan University Online Library’s website, you will have access to thousands of e-books and periodicals, including professional, scholarly, and trade journals, and other monographs.
Because library skills are an integral part of your academic achievement, guidance on the use of our research tools and resources is available to you through interactions with library staff, video demonstrations, and other instructional aids. The development of library skills is strengthened by research components built into the University's curriculum. Professional librarians and trained support personnel are available to assist you by email, live chat, and telephone.
Kaplan University ground locations maintain onsite resource areas that may include additional collections of books and/or periodicals, as well as computer workstations, other services, and staff to assist students.
Visit the Kaplan University Online Library (http://library.kaplan.edu).

Statement of Assessment
Assessment of your achievement is fundamental to the successful fulfillment of Kaplan University's mission. The University's comprehensive, outcomes-focused assessment plan is designed to ensure that you learn skills specific to your program of study, so that you may be successful in your chosen career, and develop knowledge in appropriate general education areas. In addition, the University is committed to assessing incoming students to ensure they possess the prerequisite foundational skills to be successful in their program of study. Data from the assessment of students' success informs decision making throughout the University.

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Admissions
In this section, you can find the University's general requirements for admission as well as requirements for international applicants. Information on entrance examinations and foundational coursework, conditional admission, first-term responsibilities, technology requirements, and the
University's nondiscrimination policy is also featured.

Admissions Requirements
These are the general requirements for applicants seeking admission. Visit the individual school sections for program-specific admissions requirements. General Requirements
In order to present a complete application, you must:
1. Complete an Enrollment Agreement and any other documents required for your chosen program and submit monies as outlined on the
Tuition and Fees Schedule. The Enrollment Agreement must be signed by a parent or legal guardian if you are under 18 years of age.
2. Complete an informational interview. For campus interviews, we welcome your spouse or parents.
3. Speak, read, and write English fluently.
4. Complete financial arrangements prior to starting class, including any necessary financial aid applications.
5. Fulfill any program-specific and/or international admissions requirements.
6. Consider a tour of the campus and/or online learning environment.
7. Attest to certain technological competencies.
8. Resolve any balance you have at a prior Kaplan University location.
Deans or their designees reserve the right to approve all candidates for admission.

Additional Requirements for Undergraduate Programs
In addition to the general admissions requirements, you must meet one of the following criteria:
1. Be a high school graduate or possess a General Education Development (GED) certificate or state-specific equivalency diploma test
2. Possess a home study certificate or transcript from a home study program that is equivalent to high school level and recognized by your home state; you must also be beyond the age of compulsory attendance in that state
3. Be a high school senior eligible to apply and submit proof of high school graduation
You must attest to high school graduation or an approved equivalent. Acceptable attestation for the University may be the proof of graduation attestation included on an Enrollment Agreement, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), or any other document deemed acceptable by the University. Tennessee residents have an additional requirement (see below).
The statements made in this attestation are verified through a random sampling of students admitted to the University. If you are selected for this verification, you will have 30 days to provide the University with acceptable evidence of high school graduation or its equivalent. If the
University is required to obtain this proof of graduation on your behalf, you will be charged a $10 fee. Title IV financial aid cannot be used to pay this fee; you must pay the fee using your own funds.
All graduates of foreign high schools must provide actual proof of graduation.
If, for any reason, your evidence or attestation of high school graduation or its equivalent is found to be false, untrue, or otherwise unacceptable, you will be subject to immediate dismissal from the University, all credits earned will be invalidated, and the University will take all other appropriate actions. All aid disbursed on your behalf will be refunded to the appropriate source, and you will be responsible for payment of these funds to the original source or to Kaplan University, as appropriate.

Criminal Background Check Requirements for Undergraduate Programs
If you are enrolling in a Kaplan University program that requires a criminal background check, before you are fully admitted into the program you must submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. No funding will be processed until an approved background check is on file. If your background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.

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Additional Requirements for Graduate Programs
You must provide an unofficial copy of your transcript which shows completion of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. In some cases, a graduate degree may also be acceptable. You must submit an official copy to the Registrar's Office by the last day of the first term.
If you already possess a graduate degree, you must obtain permission from the Dean of the respective school prior to enrolling in a Kaplan
University degree program.

Criminal Background Check Requirements for Graduate Programs
If you are enrolling in a Kaplan University program that requires a criminal background check, before you are fully admitted into the program you must have an approved criminal background check from the Kaplan University-approved vendor on file prior to the first day of your first term. No funding will be processed until an approved background check is on file. If an approved background check is not on file with the
University prior to the first day of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.

Exceptions to Standard Admissions
1. The state of Tennessee requires all undergraduate students who reside in Tennessee to supply the University with proof of graduation from a recognized high school program, receipt of a GED certificate, or receipt of a Home Study certificate. Acceptable proof consists of the following documents:
a. A copy of an official high school transcript;
b. An official GED certificate with scores or official notification that a GED certificate has been issued; or
c. A valid Home Study certificate or transcript confirming completion of a home study program.
All graduates of foreign high schools must provide actual proof of secondary completion. If you reside in the United States but attended school in a foreign country, and are unable to produce the required documents, evidence may include certification from other official sources. If you cannot provide the required documentation by the end of the first term of enrollment, you will be dismissed from the University.
2. The state of Maine requires all students born after 1956 and enrolled in an onsite degree program to provide proof of specific immunizations at the time of admission. If you are seeking admission to a Kaplan University campus in Maine, you must submit proof of immunization against measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, and tetanus. Proof of immunization must detail the administration of the following: a. A DT booster within the last 10 years
b. An adult MMR vaccination for individuals who previously received an MMR vaccination prior to their first birthday
If you fail to submit documentation of the required immunizations, you will be denied admission to the University.
3. High school students may take individual courses at the University under special local and state programs. You will be enrolled as a nondegree-seeking student until you have graduated high school and are admitted to the University under the standard admissions requirements. Acceptance to the University
Upon completion of all admissions requirements, Kaplan University administration will review the information and inform applicants in writing whether they have been accepted for enrollment.
If you are not accepted, you will have no financial obligation to the University beyond the application fee, which is nonrefundable. Questions regarding the admissions decision should be addressed to the Dean of the academic program to which you applied or the Campus President/
Executive Director.

Returning Students
In order to re-enter the University, you must meet all admissions requirements for the program you wish to enter, complete all standard admissions procedures, supply all required documents, and have a clear student account. If you have a history of conduct or behavior issues or a poor academic record, your re-entry to the University may require additional approval by the Dean of the school you wish to enter or the Dean's designee. In addition, you must be in good academic standing. If you are not, you may appeal to the Dean of the school you wish to enter. Your letter of appeal should explain the extenuating circumstances that caused you to fall below the satisfactory academic progress standards, what corrective actions you have taken to ensure success upon returning to your studies, and your desired start date. If your appeal is approved, the Dean of the school will either confirm your desired start date or require additional time before you are allowed to re-enter. A denied appeal is considered final and binding. You may not re-appeal unless new information is presented for consideration.
If your appeal is approved and you are accepted for re-entry into the University, you will be placed on Financial Aid Warning. The Financial Aid
Warning period cannot be more than one term in duration, so if you already began your Financial Aid Warning period in the last term of your most recent enrollment, you will return on Financial Aid Probation. There are no financial aid restrictions during this time.

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International Applicants
Kaplan University is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant, alien students. If you are interested in enrolling in an online nursing, health science, or education program, speak to your Admissions Advisor for information related to international availability. Not all programs are available for enrollment.
As an international applicant, you must meet the following requirements in addition to the general admissions requirements:
1. Be at least 18 years old
2. If applying to an onsite program, submit bank statement(s), with balance(s) converted into U.S. dollars, indicating that you or your parent/ guardian has sufficient funds to cover the costs of tuition, fees, and/or living expenses for the entire program of study, or a certified government sponsor letter indicating that tuition, fees, and/or living expenses will be paid in advance of each term. If you are enrolled in
English language course(s) at another institution, bank statement(s) or a certified government sponsor letter proving sufficient funds for the entire Kaplan University program can be submitted along with the Enrollment Agreement.
3. Provide evidence of English language proficiency by submitting one of the following:
a. Proof of completion of secondary education (or higher) in a country where English is the primary language
b. A transcript indicating completion of at least 45 quarter credit hours (or equivalent) and a CGPA of 2.0 or higher (or equivalent) from a university located in an English-speaking country
c. Proof of completion of secondary education at an international high school where English is the primary language of instruction
d. A transcript indicating completion of an English composition course with a grade of "C" or better from a U.S. institution of higher learning e. The minimum required score on the University's English Proficiency examination
f. Official results of an approved English proficiency exam. Minimum scores given below:
TOEFL
Undergraduate
Graduate

PAPERBASED

COMPUTERBASED

INTERNETBASED

525
550

195
213

71
80

IELTS
Undergraduate
Graduate

6 (no band less than 5.5)
6.5 (no band less than 5.5)

EIKEN
Undergraduate
Graduate

Grade 2A
Grade Pre-1

PTE
ACADEMIC
Undergraduate
Graduate

48
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Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC)
In lieu of the TOEFL, prospective students may submit scores from the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC). A minimum score of 750 is required for admission to the University. Complete information on the TOEIC is available at www.ets.org/ toeic. Defense Language Proficiency Test, English Comprehension Language (ECL)
International military students (IMS) must score an 80 percent out of 100 percent for officer-level courses (i.e. AMEDD Captains
Career Course; Principles of Mil. Prev. Med.) and 70 to 75 percent for selected enlisted/technical/apprentice-level courses (ie. 68W;
68E; 68S). You will be given two opportunities to achieve the required score, otherwise, you may be returned to your home country unless the school grants a language waiver.
4. If applying to an onsite program, submit an enrollment fee of $100.00 with the Enrollment Agreement, which will exempt you from paying administrative, application, and registration fees stated on the Tuition and Fees Schedule, if applicable. The application fee is fully refundable if you decide not to complete the enrollment process or are not accepted by the University.
5. If applying to an onsite program, submit a registration fee of $100.00. Upon receipt of the Enrollment Agreement, the University will issue the appropriate paperwork to apply for a student visa if you are attending a residential campus.
6. If applying to an online program, submit a tuition deposit and/or application fee as stated on the Enrollment Agreement.

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Entrance Examinations and Foundational Coursework
As a condition of your enrollment in an undergraduate program, you may be required to take an entrance assessment.
If you do not achieve a minimum score, you may not be permitted to continue with the enrollment process, or you may be required, as an additional component of your conditional admittance, to complete foundational coursework and earn a grade of satisfactory (“S”).
You may retake foundational coursework once. However, if on the second attempt, you do not earn a grade of "S", you will not be permitted to reapply for admission to the University until a 1-year period has elapsed.
Onsite students are encouraged to register for one or two select first-term courses to accompany the foundational coursework. Please consult with your Education Advisor to determine available courses.

Conditional Admission
If you are a first-time undergraduate student at Kaplan University, you are considered conditionally admitted to the University and are not eligible for Title IV federal financial aid while in this status. All of the University's policies nevertheless apply, however, and you enjoy all the rights and resources of a fully accepted student during the period of conditional admission.
Nondegree-seeking students, students enrolled in Open College at Kaplan University, returning students, and students enrolled in graduate programs will be considered fully accepted rather than conditionally admitted.
If, at the end of the third week of classes, you have participated in academic activity during the third week of the term, you will be fully accepted into your program and become eligible for Title IV federal financial aid and to receive credit for all coursework completed. See the Attendance policy for further details on academic activities.
If you wish to depart the University without financial obligation, other than any application fee, you may do so by communicating this to your
Education Advisor (online) or the Campus President or his or her designee (onsite) by phone or in writing prior to the end of the third week.
If you do not meet the criteria stated above, Kaplan University will not accept you as a fully enrolled student and your enrollment will be cancelled. You will not owe any financial obligation to the University except for the application fee, which is nonrefundable. If you decide to reapply for admission, you will not be eligible for the Kaplan Commitment again and must have all necessary documentation on file before reapplying. If you reapply for admission within 6 months of having your enrollment cancelled, you must submit an appeal to the Dean of your program (online) or the Academic Dean of the campus (onsite).
Onsite students must return all textbooks; failure to do so will result in a charge for those textbooks not returned. If you purchased textbooks for an undergraduate program, you may return them without charge at this point. If you purchased textbooks for a graduate program, you will be subject to the return policy of the seller and are encouraged to closely review this policy.

First-Term Responsibilities
By the last day of the first term, you must supply the official transcripts required for your enrollment. Failure to comply with this deadline will result in withdrawal from your program and blocked reentry until an official transcript is provided or you change your program of study to one that does not require proof of graduation.


If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN degree option, you must furnish an official transcript indicating an associate's degree, diploma, or certificate in nursing with a minimum of 50 quarter credit hours of eligible credit with a focus in nursing.



If you are enrolled in a graduate or postbaccalaureate program, you must supply an official transcript showing completion of a bachelor's degree or higher credential, as required by your program of study.

A Note on Acceptable Credentials
There are institutions and companies who will provide any sort of educational credential for a fee with minimal or no student work required.
Certificates and diplomas of this nature are not valid and you cannot be admitted based on such documentation. Kaplan University will examine the provenance of every credential and will approve only those that come from appropriately accredited sources.

Foreign Credentials
A foreign credential is defined as one issued by an institution that is not located in the United States or its territories and is not accredited by a
U.S. accrediting agency.

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Generally speaking, foreign transcripts and similar credentials must be evaluated by a third-party agency (please speak to your Admissions
Advisor to discuss approved agencies). If you are applying to a program that requires completion of a prior degree, a transcript-level evaluation
(and translation, if applicable) is generally sufficient. If you wish to have individual courses evaluated for transfer, you will need to commission a course-level evaluation (and translation, as appropriate).
Applicants presenting a 3-year bachelor's degree will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the relevant Dean.

Technology Requirements
As part of the admission process to Kaplan University, you are required to attest to certain competencies in the use of technology.
You must have the following skills:
1. Ability to use email to correspond with faculty, staff, and students
2. Ability to access, create, and save documents in Microsoft Office formats; at a minimum, you must be familiar with Microsoft Word
3. Ability to browse the Web, including downloading and installing common plug-ins (listed below) and configuring common browser options
4. Ability to configure and run applications, including an antivirus application, to ensure that your system is secure and transmitted files are virus free
To enroll in classes online, you must have access to a computer and meet the hardware and software requirements (http:// www.kaplanuniversity.edu/admissions/student-technology-requirements.aspx). Some of the requirements listed are applicable only to specific courses and are indicated accordingly.

Nondiscrimination Policy
Kaplan University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, nondisqualifying disability, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, or veteran status in the recruitment of students or in the implementation of its policies, procedures, and activities. Sexual harassment is a prohibited aspect of sexual discrimination under this policy.

Applicable Laws and Regulations
The University’s policies and practices are in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations including:


Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, and the implementing regulations 34 CFR Parts 100 and 101 (barring discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin)



Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the implementing regulations 34 CFR Part 105 (barring discrimination on the basis of sex) •

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and the implementing regulations 34 CFR Part 99



Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the implementing regulations 34 CFR Part 104 (barring discrimination on the basis of physical handicap)



The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 and the implementing regulations 45 CFR Part 90



The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and the implementing regulations in 29 CFR Part 1630 (1992)

The University is committed to full compliance with these laws and has appointed compliance coordinators to assist those who have questions or concerns with respect to the University’s compliance with these laws. The name, address, and telephone number of these staff members are available through the University.
The University has designated the following person as the Manager of Disability Services:
Tiffani Ashline
6301 Kaplan University Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309
Tel: 954.515.3389
Email: tashline@kaplan.edu

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Title IX Compliance
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination based on gender in any educational program or activity that receives financial support from the Federal government. Under Title IX, discrimination based on gender includes sexual harassment and sexual violence.
Title IX also prohibits retaliation against individuals who complain about or participate in an investigation regarding an alleged Title IX violation.
Any individual who has questions or concerns regarding possible gender discrimination should contact the Kaplan University Title IX coordinator
Justin O’Sullivan or the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights.

Title IX Coordinator at Kaplan University
Justin O’Sullivan
6301 Kaplan University Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309
Email: Titleix@kaplan.edu
Tel: 954.515.4407

U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights
Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-1100
Tel: 800.421.3481
Fax: 202.453.6012
TDD: 877.521.2172

Disability Services
Pursuant to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), the University will provide reasonable and individualized academic modifications for students who have provided proper documentation outlining their disabilities and have requested reasonable and appropriate accommodations. Because each student’s disabilities may differ in degree and impact, reasonable accommodations will be made on an individual basis. However, if you have a disability, it is your responsibility to seek available assistance and make your needs known at the time of enrollment or as the need arises due to disability. At the time of the request, you must provide the
University with documentation to support the disability. Information pertaining to a disability is voluntary and confidential. If this information is supplied, it will be used to seek to overcome the effects of conditions that limit the participation of qualified disabled students.

Online
The Center for Disability Services is the primary office responsible for the coordination of services for students with disabilities. If you are seeking reasonable and appropriate accommodations, you may request, through your Education Advisor, to be placed in contact with the Center for Disability Services, or may contact the Center for Disability Services directly.
The University has designated the following person as the Manager of Disability Services:
Tiffani Ashline
6301 Kaplan University Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309
Tel: 954.515.3389
Email: tashline@kaplan.edu

Onsite
The name, address, and telephone number of the Disabilities Coordinator are noted in a supplement to this Catalog, are posted in the Admissions
Office, and can be obtained from the Campus President/Executive Director.

Discrimination Grievance Procedures
Federal law prohibits discrimination on the bases of age, race, color, national origin, sex, and disability in programs receiving federal financial assistance. Kaplan University encourages you to bring all complaints or grievances regarding such discrimination to its attention.
A discrimination grievance is any complaint regarding discrimination on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, including sexual harassment, or disability by Kaplan University or any Kaplan University employee, student, or other third party. If you have a complaint, you may present a grievance through the following discrimination grievance procedures. Kaplan University will investigate all complaints or grievances fully and promptly.
1. You should first bring the grievance to the attention of the Discrimination Grievance Coordinator, whose name and contact information appears below, as soon as possible following the occurrence of the alleged discrimination.
Justin O'Sullivan
Director of Student Relations

33

6301 Kaplan University Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309
Tel: 954.515.4407
Email: studentrelations@kaplan.edu
The grievance must be in writing and contain the following information:
a. Your name and address;
b. Description of and date of alleged violation;
c. Names of persons responsible for the alleged violation (if known);
d. Requested relief or corrective action, if applicable; and
e. Any background information you believe to be relevant.
2. Upon the filing of a grievance, Kaplan University will conduct an investigation using a preponderance of the evidence evidentiary standard.
If applicable, the University may take your statement and statements from witnesses. In cases of alleged sex discrimination, both the complainant and the alleged perpetrator will have the opportunity to present witnesses and evidence. Where appropriate, the University may impose interim measures upon the filing of the claim such as restrictions on contact; course-schedule or work-schedule alteration; leaves of absence; or increased monitoring of certain areas of the campus. These interim measures are subject to review and revision throughout the grievance process.
3. Following receipt of the grievance, Kaplan University will complete its investigation within a reasonable time (generally 60 days) and provide written notice to you and all alleged responsible parties of the outcome of the investigation, the basis for its decision, and any remedies determined to be appropriate.
4. If Kaplan University determines that discrimination has occurred, it will take all appropriate steps to prevent the recurrence of the discrimination and to correct the effects felt by you and others, if appropriate. Potential sanctions for individuals determined to have committed acts of discrimination include a written warning concerning the misconduct and may result in disciplinary action up to and including immediate suspension and/or dismissal. Potential remedies may include disciplinary action against the perpetrator, requiring counseling for the perpetrator, remedies for the complainant and others, as well as changes to the school’s overall services or policies.
5. You may also contact the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights at:
Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-1100
Tel: 800.421.3481 (Toll Free)
Fax: 202.453.6012
TDD: 877.521.2172 (Toll Free)
You may file a criminal complaint or a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights at any time before, during, or after the grievance process. You do not have to complete the Kaplan University grievance process before contacting the Office for Civil Rights.
Students who feel they may have been the victim of discrimination are encouraged to contact the Kaplan University Title IX Coordinator for sources of counseling, advocacy and support.

Jurisdiction
This Procedure applies to sexual or gender-based harassment that is committed by students, faculty, staff, or third parties that occurs on Kaplan
University property; or off Kaplan University property, if the conduct was in connection with a University or University-recognized program or activity. Confidentiality for Title IX Gender Discrimination Complaints
University staff that are aware of a Title IX gender discrimination complaint will take reasonable steps to protect the privacy of all involved. Once a complaint is filed, the Complainant, the Respondent, and any witnesses will be notified that disclosing information about the case may interfere with the investigation and they are expected to keep all information confidential. They also will be notified that that University Policy prohibits retaliation, and that school officials will not only take steps to prevent retaliation, but will also take strong responsive action if it occurs.
Upon Filing a complaint, if the complainant requests to remain anonymous, the Title IX Coordinator will determine how to proceed with the investigation while factoring in the University’s obligation to provide a non-discriminatory environment, and the Respondent’s rights to have notice of any allegations. Anonymity may limit the effectiveness of an investigation, or may prevent it from moving forward. The Complainant will be informed of the Title IX Coordinator’s determination in this situation.
Nothing in this procedure prohibits or limits your right to report complaints to any regulatory or legal enforcement body including the state or federal departments of education.

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Retaliation
It is a violation of Federal law and Kaplan University policy to retaliate against any person making a complaint of discrimination or against any person participating in the investigation of any such allegation. Retaliation should be reported promptly to the Title IX Coordinator. Retaliation is grounds for disciplinary action.

Definitions
Sexual Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, such as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature.
Sexual Violence is a form of sexual harassment and refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent (e.g., due to the student’s age or use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability prevents the student from having the capacity to give consent). A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual abuse, and sexual coercion.
Gender-based Harassment is another form of sex-based harassment and refers to unwelcome conduct based on an individual’s actual or perceived sex, including harassment based on gender identity or nonconformity with sex stereotypes, and not necessarily involving conduct of a sexual nature.
Kaplan University prohibits sex-based harassment by peers, employees, or third parties that is sufficiently serious to deny or limit a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the recipient’s education programs and activities (i.e., creates a hostile environment).
Harassing conduct may take many forms, including verbal acts and name-calling, as well as non-verbal behavior, such as graphic and written statements, or conduct that is physically threatening, harmful, or humiliating. The more severe the conduct, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to prove a hostile environment, particularly if the conduct is physical. Indeed, a single or isolated incident of sexual violence may create a hostile environment.

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Term Registration
In this section you can find information on registration, attendance, requesting a leave of absence or withdrawing from the university, and repeated courses.

Registration
You may register for your courses using available self-registration tools or by working with Education Advising (online) or Academic Advising
(onsite). While you should register for courses well in advance, you may make changes to your registration without academic penalty through the seventh day of the term. This is the add/drop period, after which course withdrawals will result in penalties. In courses and course modules of 5 weeks or fewer in duration, changes may only be made without penalty in the first 2 days of the parent (10-week) term (and are permitted every term in the Dental Assistant Diploma program).
Course withdrawals are not permitted in the final 28 days of a term (21 days in 6-week terms, 14 days in courses and course modules of 5 weeks or fewer in duration), except under the terms of the military service provision or Leave of Absence Policy. Withdrawing from all courses in a term results in being withdrawn from the University.
Registration changes are subject to course availability. Registration changes at any point in the term can affect your financial aid eligibility and the time required to complete your degree. You should determine such impact before making any changes.
Registering for more than 18 credits per term requires approval from the Dean. A credit overload may result in changes to tuition charges and financial aid awards. Certain programs have specific policies governing student course loads; refer to the individual school sections for more information. Military Service Provision
If you must drop or withdraw from courses due to receipt of military orders and, as a result, are unable to attend class for more than 14 days, you will not be responsible for any tuition or fees incurred for the term in which the military order takes effect. Receipt of orders may include deployment, mobilization, activation, or a temporary duty assignment. You must notify your Education Advisor of receipt of orders and provide a copy of a valid order of duty. Any applicable waiver of expenses is only valid for the term(s) in which the military order takes effect. When this request is approved, the course(s) for that term will show an “MW” mark.
Military service of less than 14 days does not fall under this provision. If your absence due to military service is less than 14 days, you should contact your instructor(s) for alternate assignments to be completed upon return from military activities.

Course and Module Assessments
Certain course requirements can be fulfilled by achieving a passing score on a course or module assessment. For a complete list of available assessments and to register to take one, contact your Education Advisor. You will have one attempt to take an assessment and cannot take one if you have already begun or failed the equivalent course.
Note: these assessments are not available for all Kaplan University courses and there is a fee for taking a course assessment.

Nondegree-Seeking Course Enrollment
In addition to the above policies, please note the following if you are a nondegree-seeking student:
You must complete financial arrangements for each course before you will be permitted to register into it.
Not all courses are available for nondegree-seeking enrollment and some will require additional Dean-level approval before permission is given.
The Dean may wish to examine your transcripts, work experience, or other evidence of preparedness for the course, especially in situations where the course has prerequisites.
You may not enroll in a course which is part of a program that has explicit entrance requirements unless you meet the requirements and have approval from the Dean of the school in which the course is housed (e.g., nursing, medical assisting, etc.).

Matriculation into a Degree Program
You are encouraged to consult with an Admissions Advisor to ascertain which courses taken as a nondegree-seeking student will apply to a program of study. Not all courses may be applicable toward a Kaplan University degree.

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Attendance
Attendance is defined as attendance at a scheduled on-campus course meeting or, in an online course, posting to a discussion board, virtual office, or drop box, attending a seminar, or participating in a quiz or other classroom activity.
You are encouraged to attend class every day and to be on time. It is your responsibility to learn the material covered while absent and to see that you make up missed work in compliance with Kaplan University's guidelines. Hours of makeup work cannot be accepted as hours of class attendance, and makeup work is not permitted for the purpose of receiving veterans' educational training benefits.

Leave of Absence and Withdrawal
Leave of Absence
If you have completed at least one term of your degree program at the University and can demonstrate extenuating circumstances beyond your control, you may request a leave of absence. A leave generally permits you to suspend studies and return to the version of the program that you left. You must complete and sign a Leave of Absence Request Form and submit it through Education Advising (online) or Student Services (onsite) for approval. As appropriate, provide documentation to support your request. If you are seeking a leave of absence in the middle of a term, there may be impacts to your funding; therefore, you should speak with Financial Aid prior to submitting the leave request.
You may request up to one period of leave per calendar year. A leave may be from four weeks to two terms in duration, though your return date will be dependent on course and term scheduling and availability.
If you request and receive approval for a leave of absence effective before the completion of a term, you will receive a "W" for each attended course at the start of the leave. You are strongly encouraged to register for those courses again in your returning term.
If you are an active-duty servicemember, in the National Guard or Reserves, or are a military family member, you may take a military leave of absence for a period of up to 12 months. You may also have the option to renew this status one time for up to a total of 24 months of leave; however, if you exercise this option, you will return to the version of the degree program in effect at the time of your return.
If you do not return to class by the scheduled date and later choose to return to the University, you will need to return to the current version of the program. You are not eligible for financial aid while on leave. Please note that your lender entitles you to a 6-month grace period before entering repayment on your student loans. If you have already exhausted your student loan grace period, you will enter loan repayment immediately.

Requesting to Withdraw from the University
Circumstances sometimes require that you withdraw from the University. If your situation warrants withdrawal, please first refer to the Refund
Policy and then follow the steps below:
1. Meet with the Campus President/Executive Director or Office of the Registrar (onsite) or an Education Advisor (online) via telephone, mail, electronic notification, or in person to discuss your decision to withdraw. We will seek to make reasonable efforts to assist you in continuing your education.
2. Once you have officially notified the above indicated designee of your intent to withdraw, you should meet with a representative of the
Financial Aid Office (Bursar's Office, onsite) only if you intend to withdraw in the middle of a term. The Financial Aid Office (Bursar's
Office, onsite) can answer questions regarding financial obligations to the University, and the Financial Aid Office can answer questions regarding student loan repayment responsibilities. Refer to the Refund Policy for specific calculation information.
3. (Onsite) The Business/Bursar's Office will complete the refund calculation and communicate this to you.
4. If you are using veterans benefits and withdraw from the University, a notice of termination of enrollment will be sent to Veterans Affairs.
5. A request to withdraw from the University during the final 28 days of a term (21 days in 6-week terms,14 days in courses and course modules of 5 weeks or fewer in duration). will be treated as an end-of-term withdrawal request and will be processed after grades have been posted for that term.
6. If you withdraw from the University and wish to return, you must apply for readmission and may not return sooner than the beginning of the next grading period/term. If you withdraw from and reenter a nursing or health science program, you may be required to demonstrate competency in clinical skills prior to beginning a clinical or externship.

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Withdrawal Due to Nonattendance
Attendance has important effects on your enrollment status at the University:


If you have not participated in any class for 21 consecutive calendar days (excluding scheduled breaks), you will be administratively withdrawn from your program. You may not exceed 14 days of nonattendance if you are enrolled in a 6-week term.



If you fail to log attendance in any individual class within the first 21 days of the term, you will be dropped from the class or classes. In course and course modules of 5 weeks or fewer in duration, individual class nonattendance withdrawals will be based on the first 21 days of the parent term only.



If you are a first-term or returning student and do not register attendance within the first 7 days, your enrollment will be cancelled.



If you are withdrawn due to nonattendance, grades of “W” will be posted for your courses, except when the period of nonattendance occurs in the final 28 days of a term (21 days in 6-week terms,14 days in courses and course modules of 5 weeks or fewer in duration) when “F” grades will be posted.



If you are a nondegree-seeking student, while still strongly encouraged to attend classes frequently, you are not subject to course withdrawals due to nonattendance.

Repeated Courses
If you repeat a course, the grade received on the last repeat will replace all other grades for that course in the CGPA calculation. Previous grades earned for the repeated course will be marked on the transcript as indicated in the transcript legend. When you repeat a course, you will be charged the current tuition for the course and must assume the responsibility for all associated fees.
If you attempt a partial course (module), you may not subsequently attempt the full course. You will be dismissed for failing the same partial course the maximum number of times, as defined by your program’s policies below.
A failing grade is defined as any grade below the grade required for graduation in your program of study.
If you request entry into a program that requires a course you have failed the maximum number of times, you must first successfully complete the failed course at another institution. It is your responsibility to ensure that both the institution and the course(s) taken there meet the University's criteria for transferability.
If you choose to retake a previously passed course, you may only receive financial aid for one additional retake of that course.

Undergraduate Non-nursing Programs
If you fail the same course or its equivalent three times, you will be academically dismissed from the University

Undergraduate Nursing Programs
If you fail or withdraw from a course or its equivalent on the second attempt, you will be academically dismissed from the University.
In addition, if you are enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program, you will be dismissed from the program upon your third failure or withdrawal from any course or courses in the major requirements listed in the degree plan.
If you are enrolled in an associate’s degree or diploma program, you will be dismissed from the program upon your second failure or withdrawal from any course or courses in the major requirements listed in the degree plan.

Graduate Programs
If you fail the same course or its equivalent twice, you will be academically dismissed from the University.
If you enroll in an academic program on or after August 3, 2011, you may repeat no more than two failed courses in your program of study.
Note: Course repeat dismissals are processed at the end of each module or course; this could mean dismissal mid-term if the last unsuccessful attempt occurred in the first half of a term. This may have severe negative effects on financial aid.

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Prior Learning Assessment
You are encouraged to submit to the Registrar's Office all evidence of prior learning for evaluation. If you receive veterans benefits through
Kaplan University, you must submit documentation of previous education for review.
All prior learning is reviewed on a case-by-case basis and credit is awarded ultimately at the discretion of the University.

General Guidelines
These are the general guidelines governing the application of prior learning credit. Visit the individual school sections for program-specific admissions requirements
1. Credits earned in any combination of prior learning credit will not exceed 75 percent of the credits required or 50 percent of a graduate degree; however, in graduate programs, these courses must be completed by the time you enroll at Kaplan University. Program-specific exceptions may apply. Please refer to the individual school sections for more information.
2. You must provide evidence of prior learning prior to the first day of the course for which the credit is intended.
3. Transcripts from foreign institutions must meet the same requirements as domestic institutions, and you must have them evaluated by an approved foreign credential evaluator before submitting them to the Registrar's Office.
4. Courses must be relevant to the degree in which you are enrolled.
5. Unless noted in the school-specific requirements, only transfer credit may be applied toward graduate programs.
6. Graduate transfer work completed more than 5 years prior to admission to the University will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis in order to determine the applicability of the coursework.
7. Kaplan University does not guarantee the transferability of credits from other educational institutions or other sources of prior learning.
8. Kaplan University considers a semester credit hour to be equal to 1.5 quarter credit hours. Course-to-course transfers based on course objectives or outcomes can also be applied.

Types of Credit
Noted below are the types of prior learning for which the University may award credit.

Transfer Credit
If you attended other institutions in the past, you are encouraged to submit official transcripts to the Registrar's Office. Tennessee residents should refer to their state-specific Enrollment Agreement.
In order for a course to be transferrable, it must meet all of the following criteria:
1. It was completed at an accredited institution;
2. It is included on an official transcript;
3. It carries a grade of "C-" or better (undergraduate course), or "B" or better (graduate course); Kaplan University cannot consider marks of
"Pass," "Credit," or similar;
4. It must be 100-level or higher and not otherwise designated as remedial, college-preparatory, or not at a college level;
5. It is relevant to your program of study and equivalent to the course requirements of your program (note that in some cases, we may ask you or your prior institution for a course syllabus or similar documentation to assist us in evaluating a particular course);
6. It must fit into your degree plan; and
7. It meets any additional program-specific requirements.
We strongly recommend that you provide your official transcripts to the Registrar's Office by the last day of the first term. After this point, in certain cases, we may deny you the opportunity for a transfer credit evaluation due to course scheduling factors.

Credit by Examination
Kaplan University offers you several opportunities to earn credit by achieving passing scores on externally administered exams (CLEP,
DANTES, AP, Excelsior, and others).

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Official results of external tests must be received by the Registrar's Office prior to the first day of your final term, and always prior to the first day of the course(s) the exams are intended to replace.

External Examinations
Kaplan University awards credit for passing scores on external exams such as DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs), the College Level
Examination Program (CLEP), the Advanced Placement Program (AP), Defense Language Proficiency Tests (DLPTs), and other similar exams.
Kaplan University awards credit based on the minimum scores recommended by Educational Testing Service (ETS) or the American Council on
Education (ACE). Credit may be awarded for each test in which the recommended minimum score is earned and based on program guidelines and course outcomes.

Experiential Learning
The University recognizes three types of learning which, broadly speaking, fall into the category of experiential learning. All three types are reviewed on a case-by-case basis for relevance to your degree plan.


Military Training: training gained during a period of military service that has been reviewed by the American Council on Education
(ACE).



Reviewed Professional Learning: transcripted learning from a professional or nonacademic environment that has been reviewed by ACE or the Registrar's Office and the appropriate Dean using ACE guidelines.



Academic Prior Learning Portfolio: a portfolio that demonstrates prior learning from work or other experience.

If you wish to submit a portfolio in consideration for experiential learning credit, you must first enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning
Portfolio, or an approved alternative, and are strongly encouraged to take this course in your first two terms. Upon successful completion of EL
206, you may submit a portfolio for up to 15 undergraduate courses, contingent on your particular program.
You may only submit one experiential learning portfolio during your time at Kaplan University.
Note: you will be charged a portfolio development course fee.

Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees
If you have earned an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from a regionally or nationally accredited college, you may be eligible to have designated lower-level courses waived from the bachelor’s degree requirements.You will be awarded credit from your prior degree for an equal number of credits as the credit value of the waived courses, giving you an advanced start in the bachelor’s degree. All credits from the prior degree beyond the advanced start credit value are evaluated individually for potential transfer toward the remaining degree requirements.
Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees and credits considered to be remedial, occupational, or specialized may not be eligible for advanced start.
A degree must have a minimum of 90 quarter credits earned toward the degree and meet the standard prior learning assessment policies to be eligible for advanced start.
Not all bachelor’s degrees offer advanced start credit. Courses eligible for waiver with advanced start credit are indicated on the individual degree plan pages.

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Student Information and Services
In this section, you can find information on academic freedoms and student responsibilities; student conduct; disciplinary actions, suspensions, and dismissals; the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act; directory information; and university services. The University's problem resolution and grievance procedures and information specific to onsite students are also featured.

Academic Freedoms and Student Responsibilities
As a Kaplan University student, you have certain rights and responsibilities. These rights and the associated responsibilities shall establish a student code of professional conduct. Primary to this code is the access to an environment free from interference in the learning process.
1. You have the right to an impartial, objective evaluation of your academic performance. You shall receive in writing, at the beginning of each course, information outlining the method of evaluating student progress toward, and achievement of, course goals and objectives, including the method by which the final grade is determined.
2. You will be treated in a manner conducive to maintaining your worth and dignity. You shall be free from acts or threats of intimidation, harassment, mockery, insult, or physical aggression.
3. Disciplinary sanctions will not be imposed without proper regard for due process. Formal procedures have been instituted to ensure adequate notice and hearing for all students subjected to the disciplinary process.
4. When confronted with perceived injustices, you may seek redress through grievance procedures established in accordance with the
University nondiscrimination policy. Such procedures will be available to those students who make their grievances known in a timely manner. 5. You may take reasonable exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and may form your own judgment, but you are responsible for learning the academic content of any course for which you are enrolled.
6. All fees and financial obligations to the University will be fully disclosed and explained.
7. You have the right and responsibility to participate in course and instructor evaluations and give constructive criticism of the services provided by the University.
8. You have the right to a quality education. This right includes quality programs; appropriate instructional methodologies and content; instructors who have sufficient educational qualifications and practical expertise in the areas of instruction; the availability of adequate materials, resources, and facilities to promote the practice and application of theory; and an environment that stimulates creativity in learning as well as personal and professional growth.
9. You are responsible for conducting yourself in a professional manner within the institutional, clinical, externship, and lab settings, and to abide by the policies of the University.
10. You are expected to conduct all relationships with University staff and faculty, your peers, and your clients with honesty and respect.
11. You are to comply with directions from Kaplan University faculty and staff members who are acting within the scope of their employment, subject to your rights and responsibilities.
12. You have the right and responsibility to develop personally through opportunities such as formal education, work and volunteer experiences, extracurricular activities, and involvement with others.
13. You are encouraged to apply creativity in your own learning process while striving for academic excellence and to share your knowledge and learning experiences with fellow students in the interest of greater learning and better practice of the profession.
14. The responsibility to respect and protect the learning environment at the University is shared by all members of the academic community and administration. The freedom and effectiveness of the educational process at the University depends on maintaining an environment that is supportive of diversity and the uniqueness of ideas, cultures, and student characteristics. This diversity and uniqueness is the essence of academic freedom.

Student Conduct
You are required to conduct yourself in accordance with the standards of your future profession. The University has also taken precautions to discourage dishonesty and preserve the academic integrity of its programs.

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Conduct Violations
You will be held accountable for, or should report, the following violations:
1. All forms of dishonesty including cheating, plagiarism, forgery, and intent to defraud through falsification, alteration, or misuse of Kaplan
University documents (see also the Honor Code).
2. Theft, deliberate destruction, damage, misuse, or abuse of Kaplan University property or the property of private individuals associated with the University.
3. Inappropriate or profane behavior that causes a disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, or other Kaplan
University activities.
4. Failure to comply with Kaplan University officials acting within the scope of their employment responsibilities.
5. Failure to comply with all Kaplan University regulations, whether contained in official University publications or announced as administrative policy by a University official or other person authorized by the Campus President/Executive Director or the President of the
University.
6. Violence or threats of violence toward persons or property of students, faculty, staff, or Kaplan University.
7. Improper use of email and Internet access. See Responsible Use of University Technology for additional information.
8. Failure to comply with federal copyright and criminal laws forbidding the copying or alteration of copyright-protected materials such as computer programs, music, movies, photographs, or written materials.
9. Sharing Kaplan University-provided user name and password information with another person, allowing another to impersonate a student while logged into any University system, or logging into any University system with another person's user name and password. Kaplan
University provides each student with a distinct user name and password combination so that the University may confirm the identity of students as they log into online courses. Misuse of this information, impersonation of a student, or allowing another to impersonate a student is strictly prohibited.

Onsite Conduct Violations
If you participate in onsite activities on Kaplan University, clinical, or externship property, you will be held accountable for, or should report, the following violations:
1. The use of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances on Kaplan University or externship property, including the purchase, consumption, possession, being under the influence of, or sale of such items.
2. If you are enrolled in a health sciences program that involves a clinical and/or externship component, the University may require you to submit to a drug/chemical substance test at any time during the course of the program if there is evidence of impaired behavior that may pose a risk to patients, other students, or the education program. The requirement to submit to a drug/chemical substance test is based on an assessment of behavior that reflects possible drug use and/or impairment, and you will be required to cover all expenses incurred unless you live in the state of North Dakota, in which case, the University will cover the expenses. If applicable, you must provide a valid, verifiable, current prescription and evidence of appropriate medical supervision for medications that may affect your academic or clinical performance during your educational program. You will not be allowed to return to the externship site or participate in onsite clinical courses until drug testing results are presented to, reviewed, and approved by the program chair. If you refuse the test, the University will assume you are using drugs/alcohol, which is considered a conduct violation and subject to disciplinary action identified in the Disciplinary Actions,
Suspensions, and Dismissals section.
3. If you are enrolled in a nursing program, the University may require you to submit to a drug/chemical substance test at any time during the course of the program if there is evidence of impaired behavior that may pose a risk to patients, other students, or the education program.
The requirement to submit to a drug/chemical substance test is based on an assessment of behavior that reflects possible drug use and/or impairment. You must provide a valid, verifiable, current prescription and evidence of appropriate medical supervision for medications that may affect your academic or clinical performance during the nursing program. If you refuse the test, the University will assume you are using drugs/alcohol, which is considered a conduct violation.
4. The use of any tobacco products in Kaplan University buildings, and eating or drinking in the classrooms or any location other than designated areas.
5. Bringing animals onto Kaplan University property. No animals are allowed on the premises unless they are assisting the physically impaired or are being used as classroom subjects.
6. Bringing children into Kaplan University teaching areas. The University does not provide childcare services and cannot assume responsibility for their health and safety.
7. Failure to comply with all emergency evacuation procedures, disregarding safety practices, tampering with fire protection equipment, or violation of any other health and safety rules or regulations.
8. Inappropriate use of pagers, cell phones, or other electronic devices. All electronic devices must be in the "off" position while in the classroom. 9. Bringing dangerous items such as explosives, firearms, or other weapons, either concealed or exposed, onto Kaplan University property.

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10. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, intimidation, harassment, coercion, stalking, and/or any conduct that threatens or endangers the physical or psychological health/safety of another person.
11. Rape, including acquaintance rape and/or sexual assault, in any form.
12. Unauthorized presence in, or forcible entry into, a Kaplan University facility or Kaplan University-related premises.
13. All forms of gambling.
14. Being in the presence of and/or aiding/abetting any of the aforementioned conduct violations.
Committing any of the violations listed above may result in a written warning concerning the misconduct and may result in disciplinary action up to and including immediate suspension and/or dismissal.

Personal Appearance
You are required to dress in an appropriate manner while on campus and at an assigned internship, externship, or clinical location. You should show concern for the appropriateness of dress while attending the University and be guided by the principle that what is proper for the workplace is proper for the University. You are expected to practice good personal hygiene habits and maintain a clean, neat, and professional appearance at all times. If you fail to meet the dress requirements, you will be sent home and time missed will be recorded as an absence

University Violence Prevention
Kaplan University views the health, safety, and security of its students, faculty, staff, campus community, and visitors as its highest priority.
To foster an atmosphere that promotes Kaplan University's educational mission, the University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy environment free of violence and threats of violence on campus, other work sites, and other places where members of the University community are engaged in University-sponsored activities.
Any behavior that is threatening, harassing, intimidating, or in any way dangerous or violent is strictly prohibited, will not be tolerated, and will result in swift remedial action. Any individual who is found to have engaged in such behavior will be subject to discipline, expulsion from Kaplan
University, and/or referral to law enforcement authorities.
No individual will be subject to retaliation for making a good-faith report of real or perceived violence or threats of violence. All such behavior must be immediately reported to local law enforcement services and the Office of the Dean of Students via studentrelations@kaplan.edu.

Responsible Use of University Technology
Kaplan University values freedom of expression and encourages diverse viewpoints endemic to an academic institution. At the same time, the
University expects you to act in a responsible, ethical, and legal manner when using the University's school facilities, equipment, websites, and systems ("Sites"). Sites include, but are not limited to, the online classroom, online seminars, virtual campus, discussion boards, and internal email system.
To facilitate social networking and to establish a sense of community, some Kaplan University Sites allow you to post your own content or communicate with others. When you use any Sites to post or transmit text, video, audio, or other material ("User Content") for social networking purposes, you agree to accept sole responsibility for your User Content.
Kaplan University Sites are intended to be used for business and educational purposes only. You must agree that your User Content, which includes information posted or communicated that is not considered an educational record under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), may not:
1. Infringe on the intellectual property, trade secret, privacy, or publicity rights of others or contain copyright-protected material without the written permission of the copyright owner;
2. Contain any material that could be considered unlawful, harmful, threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, indecent, sexually explicit, or hateful, or content that refers negatively to people or groups on the basis of their age, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, national origin, handicap, disability, veteran status, or similar characteristics;
3. Be posted in a false name or the name of another person, or include impersonations of any person, except where such impersonations are obvious and are included exclusively for the purpose of parody;
4. Include illegal material or encourage, solicit, or glorify illegal activity;
5. Contain false statements or misrepresentations that could damage yourself, the University, or other students;
6. Include commercial advertisements or solicitations, except if the University has specifically authorized their inclusion; or
7. Include material that is otherwise objectionable to the University.
The University does not have control over and cannot censor all User Content students submit to its Sites or prevent students from uploading or adding inappropriate User Content to its Sites. The University does, however, monitor its Sites to the best of its ability to ensure that students do not submit, upload, add, or exchange any inappropriate User Content to or on its Sites.
If your User Content contains anything described above, it may result in a written warning concerning the misconduct and further disciplinary action up to and including immediate suspension or dismissal.

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If you see or hear inappropriate User Content on Kaplan University Sites, you should promptly report it pursuant to the procedures set forth in the
Problem Resolution and Grievance Procedures section.
All Kaplan University Sites and computer equipment, email accounts, facsimile equipment, Internet access, instant messaging, voicemail, and supplies, if provided, are done so exclusively to assist you in your educational activities. You should not expect that computer files, email, voicemail, Internet bookmarks, or any of your User Content are confidential or private, and, therefore, should have no expectation of privacy whatsoever related to your usage of these Sites, to the extent that the information is not considered an educational record under FERPA.
Even when content, such as a message or file, is erased, it may still be possible to recover the message or file. Therefore, the University cannot ensure the privacy of content that is not considered an educational record. Messages sent through the University's email or instant messaging accounts and Kaplan University-owned facsimile equipment, the contents of the hard drives of any computer that is the property of the University, any User Content, and any voicemail messages saved on telephones that are the property of the University may be used in administrative, judicial, or other proceedings such as those resulting from student grievances, even where the information is considered an educational record.
In addition, the University licenses software to support its educational processes. Without express written consent of the University, you are not permitted to copy, remove, alter, or install software on equipment owned by the University. By using the University's computer equipment, software, and communication devices, you knowingly and voluntarily consent to your use of these systems being monitored and acknowledge the
University's right to conduct such monitoring.

Honor Code
Kaplan University functions on a global campus, with a diverse student population and a unique study platform. These and other unique constraints make an honor code vital to the University's educational mission and integrity.
As a vehicle through which standards of personal conduct and self-regulation are established, the Honor Code is more than an aspirational goal.
Rather, it represents an integral part of the University's educational philosophy. With this goal, above all, you are warned to avoid any actions that give even the appearance of impropriety or reflect negatively on the University, its educational mission, or its students.
The Honor Code applies to any academic matter relating to your attendance, enrollment, and performance at the University. This includes any activity that may affect a grade, your status as a student, or another student's satisfaction of the requirements for graduation, such as:
1. Any application for admission or supporting documentation
2. Any final or midterm examination
3. Any quiz
4. Any essay, research paper, or other assignment for a course that you are expected to complete on your own
5. Any misrepresentation concerning grade point average, academic honors, class rank, or personal history that is made for the purpose of inducing another person to act or refrain from acting on the basis of that misrepresentation.

Prohibited Activities
1. Any behavior covered in the Academic Integrity Policy, including plagiarism (see the Academic Integrity Policy)
2. Altering academic or clinical records
3. Falsifying information for any assignments
4. Partly or wholly completing an assignment(s) by submitting work partially or wholly completed by another student
5. Copying work or written text from a student, the Internet, or any document without giving due credit to the source of the information.

Disciplinary Actions, Suspensions, and Dismissals
You are expected to conduct yourself as a responsible adult, to comply with all Kaplan University policies and regulations, to attend classes regularly, to meet your financial obligations to the University, and to maintain a satisfactory level of academic achievement.
You may be suspended or dismissed from the University if you:
1. Exhibit conduct that is found by the administration to be detrimental to fellow students, other individuals, the community, or the University, as addressed in the Student Conduct section;
2. Fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress;
3. Fail to provide required documents (e.g., transcripts) by the stated deadline or provide inadequate or false documentation, as required by certain degree programs;
4. Fail to meet attendance standards; and/or
5. Fail to meet financial obligations to the University.

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Any violation of the University's policies or regulations may result in one or more of the following disciplinary actions:
1. Verbal warning
2. Written warning
3. Grade reduction
4. Suspension
5. Dismissal
The University's administration will determine the action(s) to be taken based on the severity of the infraction and your prior disciplinary record.
Days spent on suspension will be counted as absences and cannot exceed the amount of allowable absences stated in the Attendance Policy.
You may submit a written appeal to the appropriate Kaplan University Review Committee within 10 business days of receiving notification of the disciplinary action. All grade-related and plagiarism appeals are to be directed to the Academic Appeals Committee. The appeal must include a
General Report/Compliance Form (available from your Education Advisor or a compliance coordinator) and sufficient information to permit factfinding and investigation.
The Committee will hold a meeting and you will be notified of the Committee's decision within 5 business days after the meeting.

Problem Resolution and Grievance Procedures
Many questions or concerns that you may have can be resolved simply through discussion. You should observe the stated steps in seeking a resolution. Retaliation against any student using this complaint process is strictly prohibited. A complaint of retaliation will promptly be investigated, will constitute separate charges, and will be handled in the same manner as discrimination and other grievance complaints.

Online


Step 1: Discuss your issue with the appropriate instructor, staff member, or administrative manager.



Step 2: If you are not satisfied with outcome of the discussion, you can request your complaint be filed with an ombudsperson, dean, or designated resolution person.



Step 3: If you remain unsatisfied or the complaint remains unresolved, you can file a grievance with the University's Student Relations
Department. Grievance forms may be obtained from an ombudsperson, dean, or designated resolution person and emailed to the following email address: studentrelations@kaplan.edu.
Note: If you file a complaint through an outside agency or with a University executive, your complaint will be directed to the Student
Relations Department. External agencies generally expect you to have exhausted Kaplan University's complaint resolution process first.
If your complaint is the subject of a formal external inquiry or legal action, the application of steps 1 through 3 of Kaplan University's grievance/appeal process will be suspended until the external inquiry or action is completed.
Student Relations will serve as an impartial representative of Kaplan University that is not directly involved in the issues of the complaint.
A Student Relations representative will investigate the complaint and assist in the response to the complainant. Student Relations will make every effort to complete investigations and provide responses to the complaint within 5 business days of the date it receives and assigns the complaint, or Student Relations will contact the complainant to report the status of the investigation.
Kaplan University will maintain records of all complaints and their resolutions for a period of no less than 3 years.

Onsite


Step 1: Communicate with the appropriate instructor, staff member, or administrative manager.



Step 2: Communicate with the Program Coordinator/Department Chair.



Step 3: Communicate with the Campus Academic Dean.



Step 4: Unresolved concerns may be brought to the attention of the University’s Student Relations Department by filing a grievance. You may obtain a grievance form from your Academic Dean. The completed form is then submitted to the Student Relations Department at the following email address: studentrelations@kaplan.edu.

45

Arizona Residents
If the complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting Kaplan University's grievance procedures, you may file a complaint with the Arizona State
Board for Private Postsecondary Education. You must contact the State Board for further details. The State Board's address is:
1400 West Washington Street, Room 260
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Tel: 602.542.5709
Website: www.ppse.az.gov

Florida Residents
If the complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting Kaplan University’s grievance procedures, you may file a complaint with the Florida
Commission for Independent Education. The Commission may be contacted at the below address or telephone number:
Commission for Independent Education
Florida Department of Education
325 W. Gaines Street
Suite 1414
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
888.224.6684

Georgia Residents
The Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission (NPEC) posts a complaint process on its website, www.gnpec.org. This website contains information about the complaint process and includes instructions for filing a formal complaint. According to the website, you may file a verified complaint with NPEC after going through the complaint process published by the institution.

Kansas Residents
The Kansas Board of Regents (KBOR) posts a complaint process and form on its website at www.kansasregents.org/academic_affairs/ private_out_of_state/complaint_process. The website contains information about KBOR's complaint process with instructions for filing a complaint. To initiate a complaint against a school regulated by KBOR, you must complete KBOR's form and mail or fax it to:
Kansas Board of Regents
Private Postsecondary Education Division
1000 SW Jackson Street, Suite 520
Topeka, KS 66612-1368
Fax: 888.975.8313
If you have questions or concerns, call 785.296.1529 or email dgarretson@ksbor.org.

Maryland Residents
This institution is subject to investigation of complaints by the Office of the Attorney General of the Maryland Higher Education Commission.
Maryland Attorney General
Consumer Protection Division
200 St. Paul Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Tel: 410.528.8662, 888.743.0823 (Toll Free)

Missouri Residents
The Missouri Department of Higher Education (MDHE) serves as a clearinghouse for postsecondary student complaints. The MDHE complaint policy can be found at www.dhe.mo.gov/documents/POLICYONCOMPLAINTRESOLUTION.pdf.
This web page contains information about the complaint process and includes instructions for how to file a formal complaint. Note that if you wish to file a complaint with the Department, the policy states that you must first exhaust all formal and informal avenues provided by the institution to resolve disputes.

46

Nebraska Residents
If the complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting Kaplan University's grievance procedures, the State of Nebraska’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education provides a formal process by which you may have your complaint investigated. Details of this process may be found at: http://www.ccpe.state.ne.us/PublicDoc/Ccpe/Complaint.asp. The State of Nebraska’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education may be contacted at:
Nebraska's Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education
ATTN: Complaints
P.O. Box 95005
Lincoln, NE 68509-5005
Tel: 402.471.2886

New Mexico Residents
If your complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting Kaplan University's grievance procedures, you may file a complaint in writing with the
New Mexico Higher Education Department (NMHED). You must file a complaint with NMHED within 3 years of your last date of enrollment.
You may obtain the required forms and information to file the complaint at: hed.state.nm.us/students/. The contact information for NMHED is:
New Mexico Higher Education Department
2048 Galisteo Street
Santa Fe, NM 87505-2100
Tel: 505.476.8400

Tennessee Residents
Any grievances not resolved at the institutional level may be forwarded to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission:
404 James Robertson Parkway
Suite 1900
Nashville, TN 37243-0830
Tel: 615.741.5293

Texas Residents
For students in degree programs, if the grievance cannot be resolved, students may contact:
The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Office of General Counsel
P.O. Box 12788
Austin, Texas
Email: StudentComplaints@thecb.state.tx.us
Website: www1.thecb.state.tx.us/WWW/comments/

Wisconsin Residents
Any questions or concerns about Kaplan University that have not been satisfactorily answered or resolved by the University should be directed to the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board. Their address is:
20 West Mifflin Street, 9th Floor
P.O. Box 8696
Madison, WI 53708-8696
Tel: 608.266.1996
Email: EABmail@eab.state.wi.us

Residents of All Other States
A complete list of state agencies to which you may direct questions, concerns, or complaints is provided as a supplement to the Catalog.

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Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students and their parents certain rights with respect to their education records, including those stated below. The rights afforded to, and consent required of, parents under this Act transfer from the parents to the student once the student becomes eligible.
1. Online student records are maintained for a minimum of 6 years from the end of the award year aid was last awarded or award year you last attended. Campus student records are retained for a minimum of 5 years from the end of the award year aid was last awarded or award year you last attended. Academic transcripts are maintained indefinitely.
2. You have the right to inspect and review your education records during normal school hours with an appointment within 45 days of the day the Campus President/Executive Director receives a written, dated request for access. You are not permitted to inspect or review confidential student guidance notes maintained by the University, nor financial records, including any information those records contain, of your parents or guardians.
3. You have the right to request the amendment of education records that you believe are inaccurate, misleading, or a violation of privacy. To request amendment of an education record, submit a written, dated request to the Campus President/Executive Director, clearly identify the part of the record you want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate, misleading, or a violation of privacy. If the University decides not to amend the record, you will be notified of the decision and your right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided when you are notified of the right to a hearing.
4. You have the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in your education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without prior consent from the parents or the eligible student, as applicable. The University may neither release nor disclose personally identifiable information contained in your education records to outside employers, agencies, or individuals without first securing a written release from you or your parent, as applicable, unless permitted by the Act. One exception to the above student record release policy permits disclosure without consent to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position, including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff, or a person or company with whom the University is affiliated or has contracted such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill a professional responsibility. Upon request, the University discloses educational records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
5. You have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:
Family Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information Public Notice
You have the ability to enter or restrict the listing of personal directory information through an online user interface. Upon withdrawal from the
University, student directory information will be removed, and upon graduation from the University, student directory information will become eligible for inclusion in an alumni directory.
In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), Kaplan University maintains an online directory for the
University community. Upon the first day of attendance at the University, your profile listing, including your name and user name, become available to the University community (students, faculty, and administrators). The online directory may also include information commonly referred to as “directory information.” The University designates the following categories of student information as directory information:



Address



Telephone number



Email address



Photographic representations of students



Field of study



Grade level



Enrollment status



Dates of attendance at the University



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Name

Degrees, honors, and awards received



Participation in officially recognized campus activities

The University does not accept responsibility for information published by users in the directory and reserves the right to delete or modify information posted to the directory that is abusive, inflammatory, defamatory, infringing of intellectual property, or otherwise inappropriate in an academic environment. If you improperly use the directory or any information it contains, you may be subject to disciplinary action.
Additionally, the University may release directory information to third parties without your prior consent. Directory information may be disclosed by the University at its discretion for any purpose including, but not limited to, requests from law enforcement agencies and degree verification requests from prospective employers.
If currently enrolled, you may choose to withhold disclosure of your directory information by obtaining the Directory Information Withholding
Request Form from the Registrar's Office, completing the form, and returning it to the Campus Registrar/Kaplan University Office of the
Registrar. The University will honor your request to withhold directory information; however, cannot assume responsibility for subsequently contacting you for permission to release information to prospective employers, relatives, or other persons. The absence of a specific request to withhold your directory information indicates your approval for disclosure. Additionally, your request to withhold directory information will not affect previous disclosures made by the University prior to receipt of the request.

University Services
Kaplan University offers students the services noted below.

Career Services
Career Services is a student-focused provider of career assistance and is available to degree-seeking students currently enrolled and to eligible graduates. You have access to additional resources online 24 hours a day, and experienced Career Services staff will collaborate with you to create and implement career plans by providing support and advice.
Recognizing that career development is an ongoing, lifelong process, the Career Services team strives to help you understand the importance of self-assessment, occupational exploration, decision making, goal setting, networking, the job search, and developing productive connections in the workplace. Career Services offers a collaborative link between students, faculty, and prospective employers within the global employment community. Career Services fosters a welcoming, accessible environment where diversity is celebrated and the uniqueness of each individual is valued and respected.
The Career Services staff will assist in your job search. Many students choose to work on a part-time basis during their training to help with their education costs. If you require assistance in securing part-time employment while attending classes, Career Services will make reasonable efforts to assist in your search. Additional services include assistance with job search planning, resume and cover letter review, interview preparation, decision making, job offer negotiations, and various other job search and career-related issues.
Career services offered by the University are not an obligation or guarantee of employment. Although the University will assist you, finding a job is ultimately your responsibility. The University does not guarantee that you will be placed in any particular job, or at all. Some jobs may require additional training or certification.
Although average starting wage information based on data received from employers and graduates may be available to prospective students, no employee of the University is authorized to guarantee that a graduate will earn any specific amount. Your program of study, employer needs, current economic conditions, and other factors may affect wage levels.

Guidance Services
You may experience educational, personal, or financial problems during your enrollment. Kaplan University offers education advising and other services to students, as necessary, to assist them in meeting their educational goals. If you require other types of professional assistance, the
University will refer counselors or agencies you may contact.

Student Activities and Interaction
Student interaction is considered to be an important component of the academic experience at Kaplan University. Both the facility and class organization are designed to encourage opportunities for student communication. Class assignments include group work and cooperative learning activities. You are encouraged to contact your instructors or the Director of Education (onsite)/Education Advisor (online) if you wish to join study or special interest groups.
Kaplan University offers a wide range of activities and organizations in which degree-seeking students can participate. Clubs and activities reflect students' interests at each location, including online.

Campus-Specific Information
Information relevant to onsite students is noted below.

49

Crime Awareness and Campus Security
In keeping with the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, Kaplan University makes available to all current and prospective students and employees, upon request, the University's policies and procedures for maintaining campus security. This information provides details of measures for preventing crime, instructions for reporting crimes or suspected crimes, and a record of crimes that have occurred on each Kaplan University campus.
Prior to enrolling, you may contact the University's Admissions Office to request a copy of the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Policies and Procedures, including crime statistics.

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Awareness and Prevention
In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (Public Law 101-690) and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments
(Public Law 101-266), Kaplan University provides you with a Drug-Free Schools and Workplaces information package during the matriculation process. This includes descriptions of the legal sanctions under local, state, and federal law for unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol; a description of health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol; and a list of any available drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation programs.

Personal Property
Kaplan University assumes no responsibility for loss or damage to your personal property or vehicle, including the contents of your vehicle.

Student Housing
Fawley Hall, located at the Hagerstown Campus, is a residence hall featuring furnished three-bedroom suites that include a full kitchen, living and dining area, and bathroom. Each apartment is wired for telephone and cable television services. Wireless Internet is also provided. Coin-operated laundry facilities are available to hall residents.
Other campus locations lack dormitory facilities. Although it is your responsibility to find living accommodations, the University can help you locate lodging.

Student Health Services
Kaplan University does not provide health services for students. In the event of a student medical emergency, an alerted staff member will dial
911 for medical services. If you require nonemergency medical care, you will be given information about medical services or agencies that you may contact. Any costs incurred for medical services will be your responsibility.

50

Academic Information
In this section, you can find information on the academic calendar, program changes, obtaining a transcript or certification of enrollment, and transferring Kaplan University credits. The University’s definition of a unit of credit and the attendance policy are also featured.

Academic Calendar
Select a calendar below to review important dates.


A Track (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Academic-Calendar-A.pdf), B Track (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Academic-CalendarB.pdf), and C Track (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Academic-Calendar-C.pdf) Academic Calendars for:

Undergraduate Programs



Master of Public Administration



Master of Science in Educational Psychology



Master of Science in Environmental Policy



Master of Science in Human Services



Master of Science in Legal Studies



Master of Science in Psychology



Graduate Certificates in Addictions and Industrial/Organizational Psychology




Graduate Health Sciences and Nursing Programs

Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis

D Track (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/Academic-Calendar-D.pdf) Academic Calendar for:

Master of Arts in Teaching



Master of Science in Education



Master of Science in Homeland Security and Emergency Management



Master of Science in Higher Education



Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology




Master of Science in Criminal Justice

Graduate Business and Information Technology Programs

Dental Assistant Program Academic Calendar (http://www.kaplanuniversity.edu/dental_calendar.pdf)

If you elect certain concentrations, you may need to move to an alternate academic calendar track in order to complete the courses required.
When this occurs, you may experience a delay of 2 weeks or more between the end of the term and the beginning of the next available term in the alternate calendar track.
Unless otherwise specified, all policies apply to the full term published, not the 5-week child terms within.

Definition of a Unit of Credit
Kaplan University defines a credit hour in two ways:
1. As the reasonable equivalent of one hour of documented in-class activity (face-to-face classroom instruction and/or academically engaged activity in a virtual classroom) and two hours of documented out-of-class activity, combined to total three hours per week for ten weeks for one quarter hour of credit, including:
a. Academically engaged and documented activity in a virtual classroom includes, but is not limited to, such examples as time spent in: seminars, discussion threads, exams/quizzes, and interactive simulations/exercises.
b. Out-of-class documented activity includes, but is not limited to, such examples as time spent in: reading course-related material, writing, research, team work, study time, field trips, and tutoring.
2. As a measure that Kaplan University determines to be the reasonable equivalent to a credit hour of student work, as defined above, including such instances of awarding credit that includes, but is not limited to, the assessment of prior learning with proficiency shown via such examples as:

51

a. CLEP or DANTES exam performance
b. Evaluated programs of noncollegiate instruction such as ACE-recognized credit
c. Experiential portfolio proficiency assessment
d. Course assessments
Not applicable to Concord Law School. See the Concord Law School section for Concord-specific credit hour definitions.

Program Changes
You may request to change your program of study (between most programs) by working with your Education Advisor (online) or the Office of the Registrar (onsite).
Changing your program can substantially impact your financial aid eligibility and additional charges may be assessed.
All coursework from previous programs that is accepted toward the new program will be used in calculating satisfactory academic progress.
To initiate the change of program process, speak to your Education Advisor. He or she will advise you on the process as well as how to submit any documents required by the desired program of study. The Dean of the program will make the final determination of acceptance to the program. Undergraduate
You must have at least a 2.0 CGPA and meet the admissions requirements of the desired program of study. If your CGPA is below 2.0, but your
GPA in all nonmajor courses is at least a 2.0, you may change academic programs with the permission of the Dean of the desired program.

Graduate
You must have at least a 3.0 CGPA and meet the admissions requirements of the desired program of study.

Transcripts, Certifications, and Transfer of Kaplan University Credits
Transcripts and Certifications
Diplomas
You should receive your diploma approximately 6 weeks after the end of your final term, provided all academic requirements and financial obligations have been met. If you would like a duplicate or replacement diploma, simply contact your home campus registrar's office. A replacement fee may apply.

Transcripts
You may obtain an official transcript of your academic records from the Office of the Registrar.
To obtain a transcript, you must submit an electronic transcript request (online/onsite) or a Transcript Request Form for walk-in requests (onsite) along with the appropriate payment. There is no charge for unofficial transcripts.

Certifications of Enrollment
You may obtain certification of your enrollment by submitting a request to the Office of the Registrar. Deferment or forbearance forms may also be submitted for certification, as needed. There is no charge associated with a certification.

Transfer of Kaplan University Credits to Other Schools
While Kaplan University credits are widely transferrable, it is at the sole discretion of a receiving institution to accept credits earned for transfer.
The University cannot guarantee the transferability of any credits to other institutions.
Tennessee residents should refer to their state-specific Enrollment Agreement.

52

Academic Standards
In this section, you can find information on academic grades and marks, honors and awards, satisfactory academic progress, and academic appeals. The University's Academic Integrity Policy is also featured.

Academic Grades and Marks
Academic Grades
Undergraduate Courses
GRADE

POINTS

DEFINITION

A

4.0

Superior

A-

3.7

Superior

B+

3.3

Above Average

B

3.0

Above Average

B-

2.7

Above Average

C+

2.3

Average

C

2.0

Average

C-

1.7

Average

D+

1.3

Below Average

D

1.0

Below Average

F

0.0

Failure

School of Nursing Undergraduate Programs
NUMERIC

GRADE

POINTS

DEFINITION

93–100

A

4.0

Superior

90–92.99

A-

3.7

Superior

87–89.99

B+

3.3

Above Average

83–86.99

B

3.0

Above Average

80–82.99

B-

2.7

Above Average

77–79.99

C+

2.3

Average

75–76.99

C

2.0

Average

74.99–0

F

Failure

Graduate Courses
GRADE

POINTS

A

4.0

DEFINITION
Superior

B

3.0

Above Average

C

2.0

Average

F

0.0

Failure

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Academic Marks
Academic marks, unlike academic grades, have no effect on your GPA, but might affect your academic standing by influencing your rate of completion calculation.
Affects Credits
Earned?

Affects Credits
Attempted?

AC

Assessment Credit

Yes

Yes

CC

Credit by
Examination

Yes

Yes

EC

Experiential
Learning Credit

Yes

Yes
Yes

I

Incomplete

No

NR

Not Required

No

No

P

Pass

Yes

Yes

S

Satisfactory*

No

No

TC

Transfer Credit

Yes

Yes

U

Unsatisfactory*

No

No

W

Withdrawal

No

Yes

MW

Military
Withdrawal

No

No

*Only applicable to noncredit-bearing courses

Assessment Credit
“AC” denotes a successful attempt at a Kaplan University course/module assessment. Credits marked with “AC” contribute to Kaplan University residency requirements.

Credit by Examination
You receive a grade of “CC” when you are granted credit for an externally administered examination such as CLEP or DANTES. Other credit by examination approved by the University may also be represented by this grade.

Experiential Learning Credit
You receive a grade of “EC” when you are granted credit for an internally reviewed Experiential Learning Portfolio, military training, or reviewed professional learning.

Incomplete
You receive a temporary grade of “I” when you are granted an incomplete to allow for additional time to submit coursework beyond the end of a term. This grade has no impact on your cumulative GPA until a final grade is assigned. Your “I” grade will be converted to a final grade when your instructor submits a grade change request on or before the incomplete deadline, as defined in the Academic Calendar.
Incomplete grades are not available for courses or modules delivered on a 5-week schedule.

Not Required
You may receive an “NR” if you are not obligated to enroll in a course to complete your degree requirements.

Pass, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory
Designated courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale, as indicated in the course descriptions. A passing grade will be awarded for any numeric grade corresponding to a passing grade in the standard grade scale, unless otherwise noted in the course syllabus.

Transfer Credit
You receive a grade of “TC” when postsecondary coursework you completed at another institution is applied to your enrolled program at Kaplan
University.

54

Withdrawal
You receive a “W” if you withdraw from a course or are administratively withdrawn from a course before the final 28 days of classes of a 10week course or the final 21 days of a 6-week course.

Military Withdrawal
You may be eligible to receive an “MW” when you are granted a midterm military leave of absence with approved supporting military documentation. Honors and Awards
Undergraduate Term Honors
Effective for all new terms starting on/after August 26, 2015:
You may receive term honors if, in a given term, you completed at least 10 quarter credit hours and earned a GPA of 3.70 to 3.99 (Dean's List) or
4.0 (President's List) in an associate's or bachelor's degree program.

Undergraduate Degree Honors
Effective for all graduates on/after January 1, 2016:
Degree honors will be awarded if you graduate from either an associate's or bachelor's degree program with a qualifying CGPA:


Summa Cum Laude: 4.0



Magna Cum Laude: 3.80 to 3.99



Cum Laude: 3.70 to 3.79

This honor will be included on your diploma and your transcript.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards
You will be evaluated at the end of every term for satisfactory academic progress according to both a qualitative and quantitative standard.

Maximum Time Frame
If you are enrolled in an undergraduate program, you may not attempt more than 150 percent of the published program length, as measured in credit hours. For example, if a program requires successful completion of 90 credit hours, you may not attempt more than 135 credits (90 x 1.5).
Credit awarded for prior learning will affect the maximum time frame (see below).
If you are enrolled in a graduate program, you must complete the program in a 200 percent time frame. Additionally, you must complete the degree program no later than 7 years after completing the first class.
You will be immediately dismissed if the Office of the Registrar determines that it is ultimately impossible for you to complete all program requirements within the maximum time frame.

Evaluation Schedule
As a degree-seeking student, you will be evaluated at the end of every term for satisfactory academic progress according to both a qualitative and quantitative standard. Terms are equal to payment periods for financial aid purposes. The qualitative standard is defined as a minimum
CGPA equal to the CGPA required for graduation. The quantitative standard is calculated by dividing the cumulative number of credits you have successfully completed by the cumulative number of credits you have attempted and is expressed as a percentage.
Degree

Minimum CGPA

Minimum Pace of
Completion

Undergraduate

2.0

66.6%

Associate's/Bachelor's
Level Nursing

2.5

66.6%

Graduate

3.0

50.0%

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If you do not meet the satisfactory academic progress standards, you could lose your eligibility for federal financial aid. Financial aid recipients should refer to the Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid section.

Academic Probation and Dismissal
Academic Probation
If you do not meet all satisfactory academic progress standards at the end of any given term, you will be placed on academic probation and notified of the status change. In addition, you are strongly encouraged to seek academic advising and employ academic resources to regain good academic standing.
At the end of the probation term, unless you have an approved satisfactory academic progress appeal on file, you will be dismissed from the
University if you are unable to regain good academic standing by meeting all satisfactory academic progress standards.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals
The University may determine you are making academic progress, even if you do not meet the satisfactory academic progress standards, if the
University determines that your failure to meet those standards was due to unforeseeable, extenuating circumstances, including the death of a relative, illness, or injury, or other special circumstances.
If you are placed on academic probation, you may submit an appeal to be placed on final academic probation (see below). The written appeal should explain the extenuating circumstances that caused your inability to meet the satisfactory academic progress standards and explain the corrective actions you have taken to ensure academic success if the appeal is granted. You may begin the appeal process during the period of academic probation and are encouraged to include supporting documentation that could have a bearing on the University's decision.
Satisfactory academic progress appeals will be reviewed by the Academic Dean's Office, and you will be notified of the decision.

Final Academic Probation
If you do not meet the satisfactory academic progress standards at the end of the probation term, but are able to meet the minimum graduation requirements within the maximum time frame and have an approved satisfactory academic progress appeal on file, you will be placed on final academic probation. You will be notified of the status change if you are placed on final academic probation.
The University will make a determination to place you on final academic probation for a payment period or create a customized academic plan that will define the academic standards you must meet in order to comply with the satisfactory academic progress standards by a specific point in time. Academic Dismissal
You will be academically dismissed from the University if:


You are placed on academic probation and are not approved to continue through the satisfactory academic progress appeals process, and/or



You are placed on final probation and either do not make satisfactory academic progress by the end of the term or do not meet the terms of your academic plan.

If you do not earn a cumulative GPA of 1.0 or higher at the end of your first term of enrollment with the University, you will be subject to immediate dismissal.

Grades Affecting Academic Progress
All credit hours attempted toward your current program of study will be considered when evaluating academic progress. Course withdrawals and repeated courses will be considered credit attempts for which no credit is earned. If an incomplete grade is granted, the course will be considered a credit attempt for which no credit is earned until a final grade is assigned. Remedial courses and military withdrawals will not affect satisfactory academic progress.
Any credits awarded for prior learning (“TC,” “CC,” and “EC”) will be included in the pace of completion and maximum time frame calculations as both credits earned and credits attempted. If you are reentering or changing to a different program, only courses applicable to the new program will be considered when assessing academic progress.

Academic Integrity Policy
Kaplan University considers academic integrity to be one of its highest values. Though not a comprehensive or exhaustive list, the following are some examples of dishonest or unethical and unprofessional behavior and, thereby, violate the Academic Integrity Policy. Violation of the
Academic Integrity Policy constitutes a violation of the University Honor Code and will result in the disciplinary actions described in this policy.
1. Plagiarism (please refer to the Plagiarism Clarification section below)
a. Using another person’s words, ideas, results, or images without giving appropriate credit to that person; giving the impression that it is your own work
b. Copying work, written text, or images from a student, the Internet, or any document without giving due credit to the source of the information 56

c. Purchasing or contracting another person or company to complete coursework, including obtaining a paper off the Internet, from a term paper company, or from another student, and submitting it as your original work
2. Cheating
a. Using any form of banned help or information on examinations
b. Assisting another student with reasonable knowledge that the other student intends to commit any act of academic dishonesty. This offense includes, but is not limited to, providing an assignment to another student to submit as his or her own work (including selling your papers or assignments) or allowing another student to copy your answers to any test, examination, or assignment
c. Collaborating on assignments without expressed permission from your instructor
3. Misrepresentation
a. Falsifying information for any assignment
b. Submitting an assignment(s), or any part of an assignment, for more than one class without enhancing and refining the assignment, and without first receiving instructor permission. (In cases where previous assignments are allowed to be submitted for another class, it is your responsibility to enhance the assignment with the additional research and to submit the original assignment for comparison purposes) c. Submitting an assignment(s) that was partially or wholly completed by another student or anyone else

Violation of the Academic Integrity Policy
Violation of the Academic Integrity Policy may result in the following sanctions:


First offense of the Academic Integrity Policy: Failure of the assignment in which the action occurred



Second offense of the Academic Integrity Policy: Failure of the class in which the action occurred



Third offense of the Academic Integrity Policy: Expulsion or permanent dismissal from the University

All charges are recorded in Kaplan University's database and remain there permanently. All offenses you accumulate while completing a program will be carried over to any subsequent program, if and when you reenroll.
Procedures for processing violations of the Academic Integrity Policy are as follows:
1. The instructor notifies you of any charge of academic dishonesty brought against you.
2. The charge is submitted in writing by the instructor to the Provost's Office.
3. The Provost's Office sends you a copy of the Academic Integrity Policy and notification of the charge.
4. The Provost's Office, after a full review, sends you and the instructor notification of the findings with regard to the subject charge.
5. The Provost's Office maintains a database of academic dishonesty charges.
6. Please see the University's Academic Appeals Policy for information on how to appeal a charge of violation of the Academic Integrity
Policy.

Plagiarism Clarification
Plagiarism is an act of academic dishonesty. It violates the University Honor Code, and the offense is subject to disciplinary action. You are expected to be the sole author of your work. Use of another person's work or ideas must be accompanied by specific citations and references.
Whether the action is intentional or not, it still constitutes plagiarism.

Definition
Plagiarism is the theft of words, ideas, concepts, images, or research. Plagiarism is using another's words, ideas, results, or images without giving appropriate credit to that person; therefore, giving the impression that it is your own work. Whether you copy verbatim or simply rephrase the ideas of another without properly acknowledging the sources, it is still plagiarism. Whether the action is intentional or not, it still constitutes plagiarism. Expectations
All work done for the completion of a course must be your original work with appropriate citations or acknowledgements for any sources utilized in the completion of any coursework, project, or assignment. This includes, but is not limited to, discussion boards, computer programs, marketing plans, PowerPoint presentations, papers, and other assignments, including drafts and final versions.
Plagiarism offenses include, but are not limited to, the following:


Using the words, ideas, or other work from another student or the Internet without giving appropriate credit to the source



Buying a paper off the Internet, from a term paper company, or from another student and submitting it as original work

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Submitting an entire paper or project, or parts of a paper or project, that you did not produce as though it is your original work

Note: the University subscribes to a third-party plagiarism detection service and reserves the right to check all of your work to verify it meets the guidelines of this policy.

Academic Appeals Policy
Grading and Academic Dishonesty Appeals Procedures (All Schools Excluding Concord
Law School)
You must follow the below procedures to appeal a grade or an academic dishonesty charge.

Step 1
If you wish to appeal a grade or an academic dishonesty charge (e.g., plagiarism, cheating), you must first discuss the issue with your faculty member within 10 days of receiving the grade or the academic dishonesty charge.
If you are appealing a grade you believe is unfair, you should provide your instructor with a clear explanation of why. Please review the course’s grading rubrics and late policies first, as these will often resolve confusion over how a grade was calculated.
If you are appealing an academic dishonesty charge, you should provide your instructor with a clear explanation of why. Please review Kaplan
University’s Academic Integrity Policy first, as it explains the types of actions that are academically dishonest.
If the faculty member decides that a change to the grade and/or the withdrawal of an academic dishonesty charge is the correct decision, the faculty member will work with the Provost's Office and Registrar as required to resolve the issue.

Step 2
If the problem has not been resolved and you wish to pursue the appeal, you must complete and send the Academic Appeal form to the Provost's
Office. The Provost's Office will forward the appeal on to the Plagiarism Review Evaluator, an impartial expert on plagiarism. The Evaluator will consult academic department chairs and/or subject-matter experts as needed. The Evaluator will review the documentation and share his/her opinion with you and send his/her written evaluation to the Provost's Office.

Step 3
If you do not agree with the decision, you must notify the Provost's Office within 10 days of the Evaluator's decision. The Provost's Office will forward the document to the Dean of your graduate program. The Dean or his/her designee will review the appeal and either approve or deny the appeal. Results of this decision will be sent to the Provost's Office.

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Financial Information
In this section, you can find information on academic eligibility for financial aid, financial aid services, and scholarships. The University's definition of an academic year and the refund policy are also featured.
Kaplan University offers different tuition rates for military-related students and certain business-to-business partners. To view tuition and fee information, visit www.kaplanuniversity.edu/paying-school/tuition-fees.aspx. If you have a question about tuition rates, please contact your
Education Advisor.

Enrollment Status and Definition of an Academic Year
Your enrollment status can impact financial aid eligibility.
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs may have different definitions for full-time and part-time status. You should consult the University's
Certifying Official if you are receiving veterans benefits.

Undergraduate
An academic year consists of three terms of instruction, during which a full-time student will complete at least 36 credit hours. Thus, enrollment status is defined as:


Full-time: 12 credit hours per term



Three-quarter-time: 9 credit hours per term



Half-time: 6 credit hours per term

Graduate, Standard Programs (10-week schedules)
An academic year consists of 30 weeks, during which a full-time student will complete 24 credit hours. Thus, enrollment status is defined as:


Full-time: 8 credit hours per term



Three-quarter-time: 6 credit hours per term



Half-time: 4 credit hours per term

Graduate, Nonstandard Programs (6-week schedules)
An academic year consists of 30 weeks, during which a student will complete 20 credit hours. Thus, enrollment status is defined as:


Full-time: 4 credit hours per term



Three-quarter-time: 3 credit hours per term



Half-time: 2 credit hours per term

Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid
To remain eligible for federal financial aid, you are required to maintain satisfactory academic progress toward completion of your program.

Financial Aid Warning
If you are placed on academic probation, you will also be given a financial aid warning. You will have one payment period (one academic term) to regain good academic standing by meeting all satisfactory academic progress standards or you will lose academic eligibility for federal funding. The University may restore your academic eligibility for financial aid, even if you do not meet the satisfactory academic progress standards, if the University determines that your failure to meet those standards was due to unforeseeable, extenuating circumstances, including the death of a relative, illness, or injury, or other special circumstances.

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If you receive a financial aid warning, and have experienced extenuating circumstances, you should file a satisfactory academic progress appeal before the end of the payment period/term to be considered for financial aid probation and to avoid disruption to your enrollment.

Financial Aid Probation
After receiving a financial aid warning, you may submit an appeal to be placed on financial aid probation. The written appeal should explain the extenuating circumstances that caused the inability to meet the satisfactory academic progress standards and explain the corrective actions that have been taken to ensure academic success if the appeal is granted. You may begin the appeal process during the financial aid warning period and are encouraged to include supporting documentation that could have a bearing on the University's decision. You will be notified in writing of the outcome of the appeal review.
When you are placed on financial aid probation, you may also receive an academic plan. The academic plan identifies the academic standards you must meet each term in order to comply with the satisfactory academic progress standards.
When you are placed on financial aid probation, you will be denied eligibility for financial aid and academically dismissed from the University at the end of the payment period, unless you make satisfactory academic progress or the University determines that you have met the terms of your academic plan.

Financial Aid Services
Prior to enrolling at Kaplan University, you are encouraged to explore all options available for financing your education including employer or military tuition assistance or reimbursement, veterans benefits, and financial aid funding through state and federal agencies. Financial aid information and application assistance is provided by the University Financial Aid Office to help you understand your options.
If you receive loans to pay for your course of instruction, it is your responsibility to repay the full amount of the loan, plus interest, less the amount of any refund. Defaulting on loans guaranteed or reinsured by the state or federal government could result in damage to credit ratings, loss of eligibility for future student loans and other forms of financial aid, loss of deferment and monthly payment options, withholding of state and federal income tax refunds, initiation of court action, and garnishment of wages.
Additional information on eligibility requirements, alternate financing, amounts available, interest rates, scholarships, and repayment schedules is available from the Financial Aid Office.
You may be eligible for third-party funding sources from outside agencies and are encouraged to seek out such funding and familiarize yourself with the policies of such agencies. Although the University will assist you in completing the necessary forms and will provide any required information to the agency, it is ultimately your responsibility to ensure the agency's requirements are met.
Some alternative loans are only available to pay any direct tuition charges that are not covered by federal, state, or institutional funding. You are encouraged to take advantage of federal Title IV funding before applying to alternative loan programs. You and, when applicable, your parents have the right and ability to choose any lender you wish, and the University does not require that any loans be obtained from any particular lender or source.
The University is approved for the below loans and grants.

Federal Grants (Undergraduate Only)


Federal Pell Grant Program



Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program

State Grants (Undergraduate Only)



Florida Scholarship for Children and Spouses of Deceased or Disabled Veterans and Servicemembers (Florida residents)



Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program (Florida residents)



Florida Post-Secondary Student Assistance Grant (Florida residents)



Florida Jose Marti Scholarship Challenge Grant Fund (Florida residents)



State of Iowa Scholarship Program (Iowa residents)



Iowa Tuition Grant (Iowa residents)



Iowa Grant (Iowa residents)



Iowa National Guard (Iowa residents)



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Arizona Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (AzLEAP) (Arizona residents)

Maine State Grant (Maine residents—onsite only)



Nebraska State Grant (Nebraska state residents—onsite only)



Vermont State Grant (Vermont residents)

Other Grants (Undergraduate Only)


President’s Grant

Loans (Available to All Students, Subject to Eligibility Requirements)


Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan (Undergraduate Only)



Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan



Federal PLUS Loan



Alternative Loans

Work Study (Undergraduate Only)


Federal Work Study Program



State Work Study Program

Other Agencies or Programs (Undergraduate and Graduate)


Promise Jobs



Veterans Administration Benefits



Workforce Investment Act*



Division of Vocational Rehabilitation



Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES)



Canadian financial assistance may be available to those who qualify

*The University may be eligible to be an approved training provider for Workforce Investment Act (WIA) student aid. You must contact your local WIA One-Stop
Centers or your Local Workforce Investment Board to determine training program eligibility.

Refund Policy
The following individuals shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid, with the exception of the nonrefundable application fee:


Applicants who are not accepted by Kaplan University;



Applicants who are dismissed as a result of failing to meet the minimum entrance assessment score or to meet any other condition of enrollment or admittance required for the program of study; or



Conditionally admitted students who choose to withdraw by the end of week 3 of the first term.

Dropping Courses
Provided you remain enrolled in your program, you may drop a course prior to or during the first 7 calendar days of the course without any financial obligation. If you drop a course beyond the first 7 calendar days, you will incur 100 percent financial responsibility for the course.

Notice to Students
If you withdraw or are dismissed from the University up through the 60 percent point in any payment period and received federal financial aid in the form of grants or loan funds, federal law requires that the University, and in some cases you, the student, return funds you did not earn to the
U.S. Department of Education. In these situations, federal Title IV financial aid must be recalculated. Recalculation is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return of Title IV Funds formula:
1. To determine the percentage of the payment period or term completed, the number of days completed up to the last date of academic attendance is divided by the total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of 5 days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This percentage is also the amount of Title IV financial aid earned.

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2. To determine the amount of aid to be returned, subtract the percentage of aid earned from 100 percent of the aid that could be disbursed and multiply it by the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during the payment period or term as of the date you withdrew. Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula: After the 60 percent point in the payment period, you will have earned 100 percent of the federal financial aid funds already disbursed to you. This calculation concerning federal financial aid is separate and distinct from the institutional refund policy, and may result in you owing additional funds to the University to cover tuition charges previously paid by federal financial aid prior to your withdrawal.
If you earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution would be required to return a portion of the funds and you are required to return a portion of the funds. Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, you, the student borrower, may owe a debt balance to the institution. If you earned more aid than was disbursed to you, the institution would owe you a post-withdrawal disbursement, which must be paid within 180 days of your withdrawal.
If you plan to withdraw from the University, you should contact the Financial Aid or Business/Bursar's Office to determine the amount of funds that must be returned on your behalf, if applicable. All refunds due will be made within 30 days of your effective withdrawal date.
The last date of actual attendance is used in calculating any refund amount.
Refunds are allocated in the following order:
1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan
2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan
3. Federal Perkins Loan
4. Federal Parent (FPLUS) Loan
5. Federal Pell Grant
6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
7. Other Title IV assistance
8. Other state funds (unless otherwise mandated by the state)
9. Private and institutional aid
10. Student

Withdrawal After Commencement of Classes
The effective withdrawal date shall be the date on which any of the following occur:
1. The date you notify the University of withdrawal or the date of withdrawal, whichever is earlier
2. The beginning date of any term in which you fail to start classes
3. The last date of attendance once you have accumulated any 21 consecutive calendar days of absences (not including breaks)
4. The last date of attendance prior to the date when the University terminates your enrollment
5. The date that you are scheduled to return from a leave of absence and fail to do so
All refunds due will be made within 30 days of your effective withdrawal date. The last date of attendance is used in calculating any refund amount. Note: if you are conditionally admitted, you shall be subject to the Refund Policy detailed above. If you elect to continue beyond the first 3 weeks, and are fully accepted into your program, you are responsible for the full tuition amount for that term.

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Tuition Refund Chart
If you are a continuing student, not conditionally admitted, and/or conditionally admitted and have met the conditions of your admission and have been fully accepted into your program, you are subject to the Kaplan University Refund Policy and the Tuition Refund Chart. If you are a resident of Indiana, Tennessee, or Wisconsin, you should refer to your state-specific Enrollment Agreement. International students should refer to their
International Enrollment Agreement..
STUDENTS WITHDRAWING

REFUND

Prior to the first day of the term

100% Tuition

During the first day through 10% of the term

90% Tuition*

After more than 10% and through 25% of the term

50% Tuition*

After more than 25% and through
50% of the term

25% Tuition*

After more than 50% and through
100% of the term

0% Tuition

*Less $100 Administrative Fee

Maryland Residents Tuition Refund Chart
If you reside in the state of Maryland and withdraw or are terminated after completing only a portion of a course, program, or term within the applicable billing period, the institution shall pay a minimum refund as follows:
PROPORTION OF TOTAL
COURSE, PROGRAM, OR
TERM COMPLETED AS OF
DATE OF WITHDRAWAL
OR TERMINATION

REFUND

Less than 10%

90% Tuition

10% up to but not including 20%

80% Tuition

20% up to but not including 30%

60% Tuition

30% up to but not including 40%

40% Tuition

40% up to but not including 60%

20% Tuition

60% through 100% of the term

0% Tuition

The refund due shall be based on the date of withdrawal or termination and paid within 60 days from the date of withdrawal or termination. You will not be charged the $100 administrative fee if you withdraw from the University after completing 50 percent or more of any given term.

Florida Residents Tuition Refund Chart
If you reside in the state of Florida and withdraw or are terminated after completing only a portion of a course, program, or term within the applicable billing period, the institution shall pay a minimum refund as follows:
STUDENTS WITHDRAWING

REFUND

Prior to the first day of the term

100% Tuition

During the first 7 calendar days of each term

100% Tuition

After 7 calendar days and through 25% of the term

50% Tuition*

After more than 25% and through 50% of the term

25% Tuition*

After more than 50% and through 100% of the term

0% Tuition

*Less $100 Administrative Fee

Refunds shall be made within 30 days of the date of withdrawal or termination, not including the nonrefundable application fee or administrative fee. 63

Oregon Residents Tuition Refund Chart
If you reside in the state of Oregon and withdraw after completing only a portion of a course, program, or term within the applicable billing period, the institution shall pay a minimum refund as follows:
STUDENTS WITHDRAWING

REFUND

Prior to the first day of the term

100% Tuition

After more than 0% and through 10% of the term

90% Tuition*

After more than 10% and through 20% of the term

80% Tuition*

After more than 20% and through 30% of the term

70% Tuition*

After more than 30% and through 40% of the term

60% Tuition*

After more than 40% and through 50% of the term

50% Tuition*

After more than 50% and through 60% of the term

40% Tuition*

After more than 60% and through 100% of the term

0% Tuition

*Less $100 Administrative Fee

Refunds shall be made within 30 days of the date of withdrawal or termination, not including the nonrefundable application fee or administrative fee. Scholarships
Kaplan University awards scholarships, awards, and discounts for a variety of reasons, including, but not limited to, merit, military service, need, and to assist in the acceleration of an academic program. Scholarships and awards have specific requirements that must be met. Not all scholarships and awards are available on a continuous basis or at all locations, and all are subject to changes in criteria and funding. Kaplan
University also offers grants and scholarships to employees of preselected corporations, institutions, and organizations engaged in an educational alliance. Online
Contact your Admissions Advisor for additional information on scholarships or refer to www.kaplanuniversity.edu/paying-school/tuitionscholarships.aspx.
The University is pleased to offer the following scholarships for qualified students:


Kaplan University Every Credit Counts Scholarship



Kaplan University Pass the Torch Scholarship (limited availability)



Kaplan University/American Freedom Foundation Scholarship (limited availability)

Onsite
Contact a campus representative for a full listing of scholarships, awards, and discounts offered at each location.

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Undergraduate
Undergraduate Programs
In this section, you can find general policies relevant to undergraduate students as well as policy and program information specific to the Schools of General Education, Business and Information Technology, Health Sciences, and Nursing, and the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
Undergraduate courses offered by the University are also featured.

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Policy Information
The below policy information applies to students enrolled in a Kaplan University undergraduate program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. Kaplan University makes reasonable efforts to provide accurate information on test dates and fees for examinations. In some cases, work experience or field experience may be required to be eligible to take or to successfully pass these exams.
You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to sit for or will pass these exams.
In addition, a GED or high school diploma may be required to take state, national, or certification exams. Furthermore, states, employers, and various other agencies may require a criminal background check and/or drug check before you take professional licensing, certification, or registration exams. If you have a prior felony conviction or serious misdemeanor, you may be denied the opportunity to take professional licensing, certification, or registration exams. You may also be denied a license or certification to practice in some states, even if the certification or licensing exam is taken and successfully completed. It is your responsibility to inquire with the appropriate agencies or authorities about current requirements prior to enrolling in your program of choice or, if your circumstances change, at that time and at the time of making application for certification or licensure.

Employment and Continued Education
The University's programs are designed to prepare you to pursue employment in your field of study, or in related fields. However, the University does not guarantee that you will be placed in any particular job, eligible for job advancement opportunities, or employed at all. While many of the
University's degree programs are designed to prepare you to pursue continued graduate-level education, the University cannot guarantee that you will be granted admission to any graduate programs.

Criminal Background Checks
For some programs, you may be required to undergo criminal background checks before you may be fully admitted. You may also be required to conduct a second criminal background check before you can be placed in an internship, externship, or at a clinical site; or before taking professional licensing, certification, or registration exams. If you have a prior felony conviction or serious misdemeanor, you may be denied the opportunity to take professional licensing, certification, or registration exams, or may be denied a license or certification to practice in some states, even if the exam is taken and successfully completed. Consequently, you may be denied admission to some programs.
Some Kaplan University programs have specific background check requirements on which enrollment is predicated; these are explained in detail, where applicable, in the individual school sections.

Externships and Clinical Experiences
In particular phases of study, some programs include an externship or clinical experience. The following guidelines are general; some programs have additional or different policies that are detailed in the individual school sections and supersede those listed below.
Although you are supervised by professionals at your externship or clinical site, you must continue to maintain contact with your program's
Externship Coordinator on a regular basis.
In order to be eligible for an externship or clinical, you must meet the following academic requirements prior to starting the externship or clinical:
1. You must pass all required prerequisite courses, as indicated in this Catalog.
2. You may not have a grade of "F" for any major course, unless your academic record reflects that the course has been satisfactorily repeated.
3. You may not have an incomplete grade ("I") for any major course.
4. You must have a 2.0 GPA for externships graded as pass/fail.
During the externship or clinical training, you are expected to perform in an ethical, safe, and professional manner, and to assist in all matters appropriate to the scope of practice. Failure to do so may result in course failure and dismissal from the program.
For many programs, externship and clinical hours are scheduled during the day and are typically Monday through Friday. Therefore, if you take night classes, you may need to complete externship and clinical hours during the day (please note that it may not be possible to locate a site that can provide externship or clinical hours at night, and you should take this into account when selecting a program). You should contact your program's Externship Coordinator for specific information on site availability and times. You may arrange the days or times of externship or clinical training only with written permission from Kaplan University. If you are absent from the externship or clinical training, you must inform both the site and the University.
All externship and clinical sites are carefully selected based on an evaluation of site personnel, facilities, geographic location, availability, and type of learning experience provided.

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Graduation Requirements
To graduate, you must:
1. Successfully complete 100 percent of the required courses for your program of study and obtain the minimum cumulative GPA required within the maximum time frame permitted (see the Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards section for further information).
2. Return all property belonging to Kaplan University.
3. Attend Career Resources and Financial Aid exit interviews, if applicable.
4. Fulfill all financial obligations to the University prior to graduation unless previous satisfactory arrangements have been made. If satisfactory financial arrangements are not made, the graduation credential will be withheld.
Some programs may have additional requirements that must be met. If a program has additional graduation requirements, these can be found in the individual school sections.

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State-Specific Curricular Requirements
If you reside in a state listed below, please consult with your Education Advisor for details regarding methods of fulfilling the curricular requirements specific to your state.
When state-specific curricular requirements are not fulfilled by the courses prescribed in your program of study, you, in consultation with your
Education Advisor, must select appropriate courses in place of open electives.

Florida
Associate of Science Degrees
Degrees must be composed of at least 22.5 quarter credit hours of general education courses.

Bachelor’s Degrees
Degrees must be composed of at least 45 quarter credit hours of general education courses.
General education courses include English, history, philosophy, literature, religion, art, music, sociology, foreign languages, humanities, math, chemistry, biology, and psychology.

Indiana
Associate of Science Degrees
Fifty percent of the program must be composed of specialty/major courses and thirty-five percent of the remaining courses must be general education courses.

Associate of Applied Science Degrees
Seventy-five percent of the program must be composed of specialty/major courses.

Maryland
If you are enrolled in one of the following programs through the Hagerstown campus, you are required to take additional general education courses to meet state minimum requirements for general education in both associate’s and bachelor’s degrees. Associate’s degrees must include at least 30 quarter credit hours of general education courses and bachelor’s degrees must include at least 60 quarter credit hours.


Associate of Applied Science in Accounting



Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration



Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice



Associate of Applied Science in Human Services



Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology



Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting



Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management



Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration



Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration



Bachelor of Science in Human Services



Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

General education courses must include at least one course from each of the following areas:



English composition



Social and behavioral sciences



Mathematics



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Arts and humanities

Biological and physical sciences

Minnesota
Effective for all students enrolling on/after May 13, 2015, all residents of Minnesota must fulfill the following requirements:

Associate of Science Degrees
Degrees must be composed of at least 45 quarter credit hours of general education courses. General education courses include communication, natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences. A minimum of 6 quarter credits must be completed in each category.

Associate of Applied Science Degrees
Degrees must be composed of at least 30 quarter credit hours of general education courses, where at least 3 quarter credits must be completed in communication, natural sciences/mathematics, humanities, and social sciences. Degrees must also comprise at least 45 quarter credit hours of technical/major courses.

Bachelor of Science Degrees
Degrees must be composed of at least 45 quarter credit hours of general education courses, where at least 6 quarter credits must be completed in communication, natural sciences/mathematics, humanities, and social sciences. Degrees must also comprise at least 45 quarter credit hours of technical/major courses. Additionally, at least 54 quarter hours must be taken at the upper-division level.

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School of General Education
Mission
Mission Statement
The General Education program supports the academic, social, personal, and professional development of learners throughout their engagement with the University. It also provides a learning experience that is engaging, enjoyable, and applicable to students' personal and professional lives while preparing students to meet expectations in chosen fields of study. Kaplan University is committed to professional and career preparation for all graduates. As an institution and an educational community, we commit to graduating "thinkers who can work and workers who can think."

Outcomes and Requirements
General Education Program
The primary goal of the General Education program is to help ensure you are literate in each of the general education areas listed below. This means you understand and can apply the basic concepts of ethics, critical thinking, research, technology, arts and humanities, communication, mathematics, science, and social science. To help accomplish this goal, the General Education program includes six courses within the bachelor's degree programs in communication, mathematics, science, social science, and arts and humanities. A seventh course in professionalism and career development ensures you become a strong, career-focused professional. These courses are designed to introduce you to the basic concepts, terminology, and methodology of each area. Furthermore, each course offered at Kaplan University includes a communications assignment and the use of technology, reinforcing the communications and technology literacies. Each course also includes a unit of study based on one of the remaining seven literacies. These courses and units of study address practical issues and encourage you to reflect on your personal experience.
Through repeated practice and study throughout your program, you will understand the interrelationship of broad fields of human inquiry and how they apply to your personal and professional life.

Arts and Humanities Literacy
Outcome
Recognize human potential through a study of human expressions.

Requirement
One course in arts or humanities in bachelor's degree programs.* A quarter of the elective courses offered at the University will include a unit that applies art concepts to the content of the course.
*Must be fulfilled by HU 200: Critical Evaluation in the Humanities, HU 245: Ethics, HU 250: Humanities and Culture, or their equivalent (via transfer credit).

Communications Literacy
Outcome
Demonstrate college-level communication through a variety of media.

Requirement
Two 100/200-level courses in communications in associate's and bachelor's degree programs.* Each course offered at the University will also include a communications assignment that will be assessed using a common rubric.
*Must be fulfilled by CM 107: College Composition I and CM 220: College Composition II or their equivalents (via transfer credit).

Critical Thinking Literacy
Outcome
Apply critical thinking to real-life situations.

Requirement
One-third of the required courses in each program will include a unit that teaches critical thinking and applies it to the content of the course.

70

Ethics Literacy
Outcome
Identify, apply, and evaluate ethical reasoning.

Requirement
One-third of the required courses in each program will include a unit that teaches ethics and applies them to the content of the course.

Mathematics Literacy
Outcome
Apply quantitative reasoning to real-world situations.

Requirement
One 100/200-level course in mathematics in associate's and bachelor's degree programs.* A quarter of the elective courses offered at the
University will include a mathematics unit that applies math concepts to the content of the course.
*Must be fulfilled by MM 150: Survey of Mathematics, MM 212: College Algebra, or their equivalent (via transfer credit).

Professionalism and Career Development Literacy
Outcome
Apply skills which support career and professional success.

Requirement
One course in professionalism and career development in bachelor's degree programs.*
*Must be fulfilled by CS 204: Professional Presence or its equivalent (via transfer credit).

Research and Information Literacy
Outcome
Apply methods for finding, evaluating, and using resources.

Requirement
One-third of the required courses in each program will include a unit that teaches research skills and applies them to the content of the course.

Science Literacy
Outcome
Analyze how scientific principles are applied in real-world contexts.

Requirement
One course in science in bachelor's degree programs.* A quarter of the elective courses offered at the University will include a science unit that applies science concepts to the content of the course.
*Must be fulfilled by SC 200: Discovering Science-Current Issues in a Changing World, SC 235: General Biology I-Human Perspectives, SC
246: Fundamentals of Microbiology, SC 250: Science for Everyday Life, or their equivalent (via transfer credit).

Social Science Literacy
Outcome
Critically evaluate the social or psychological issues that impact human behavior.

Requirement
One course in social science in bachelor's degree programs.* A quarter of the elective courses offered at the University will include a unit that applies social science concepts to the content of the course.
*Must be fulfilled by SS 211: The 1960s-Reshaping the American Dream, SS 236: People, Power, and Politics-An Introduction to American
Government, SS 250: The Technological Revolution-A Social Scientific Approach, or their equivalent (via transfer credit).

71

72

Technology Literacy
Outcome
Use information technology to solve real-world problems and communicate effectively.

Requirement
Technology is included in context throughout each program at the University, in a manner that reflects its use in your professional field of study.
Refer to the individual program descriptions for more information. Please note: if you reside in certain states, you may be required to complete specific general education requirements. Please refer to the State-Specific Curricular Requirements section for more information.

Professional Competencies
Kaplan University Professional Competencies
At Kaplan University, we offer a wide array of programs designed to prepare you for success in your chosen career field. We believe that professionalism is the key to career success. Exhibiting professionalism allows you to engage in behaviors that contribute to a positive, productive, and cohesive work environment. In addition to understanding and applying the basic concepts of communication and problem solving and critical thinking, which are part of the General Education program at Kaplan University, you will have the opportunity to develop competencies in the areas of teamwork, leadership, personal presentation, and multiculturalism and diversity. Through repeated practice and study throughout your academic program, you will understand and learn to exhibit professionalism in your chosen career. Each outcome will be present in one-quarter of all major requirement courses.
1. Teamwork: Work in teams to achieve collective goals.
2. Leadership: Demonstrate leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully lead teams within one's profession.
3. Personal Presentation: Demonstrate professionalism in a variety of situations.
4. Multiculturalism and Diversity: Leverage the strengths of multiculturalism and diversity for the benefit of the organization and community.

General Education Mobile (GEM) Program
General Education Mobile (GEM) Program
Certain courses offered by Kaplan University are available to approved GEM Program participants. You may enroll in a maximum of five courses and no more than two courses per term.
You may transfer coursework toward a degree at the Community College of the Air Force if the following requirements are met:


You have successfully completed a course with a grade of "C" or better.



The course is part of the Kaplan University-approved GEM Program course offerings.



You are under no obligation to enroll at Kaplan University upon completion.

Courses


CM 107: College Composition I



CM 214: Public Speaking for the Professional



CM 220: College Composition II



HU 245: Ethics



HU 250: Humanities and Culture



MM 150: Survey of Mathematics



MM 212: College Algebra



SS 144: Sociology



SS 230: Making History—the Founding Fathers



SS 250: The Technological Revolution—a Social Scientific Approach



SS 270: Social Problems

73

School of Business and Information Technology
Mission
Mission Statement
We develop the competencies of career-focused students to empower them as ethical, insightful, and solution-oriented decision-makers, leaders, and lifelong learners in increasingly complex and diverse global environments. Faculty is supported as practitioners and scholars, committed to innovation in teaching and intellectual contribution.

General Policies
Please refer to the Undergraduate Policy Information section and Policy Information for general Kaplan University policies.

74

Bachelor of Science in Accounting
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program is designed to prepare you for entry into the accounting profession. Students who complete the degree will be on their way to meeting the educational requirements to be eligible to sit for the Uniform CPA Examination. Refer to the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Concentrations
In addition to the required core and major courses, you can further specialize your degree by choosing one of four concentrations: public accountancy, managerial accountancy, tax accountancy, or auditing/forensic accountancy.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. GAAP Application: Apply the conceptual framework of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles to business applications.
2. Management Tools: Formulate information for assets, liabilities, equities, revenues, and expenses of business entities.
3. Taxation: Categorize taxation of individuals and businesses.
4. Financial Reports: Evaluate financial reports.
5. Communication: Compose communications required for accounting professionals.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon graduation, you will be on your way to meeting the educational requirements for eligibility to sit for the Uniform CPA Examination. The exact requirements to take the CPA Exam vary by state and may change from time to time. To sit for the CPA Exam in most states, there is an educational requirement of 150 semester hours or 225 quarter credit hours. The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program is 180 quarter credit hours (120 semester hours). You may need to complete Kaplan University's Master of Science in Accounting or its equivalent elsewhere to meet eligibility requirements. Thus, Kaplan University makes no representations or warranties as to whether the degree program or any individual courses meet specific state requirements. You are encouraged to research independently the requirements in any state where you intend to seek licensure. 75

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

6

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
24

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

76

6
6
99

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

48

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

48

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

77

Curriculum
Public Accountancy
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

6

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
24

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
99

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

78

48
48

Concentration Requirements - Public Accountancy
AC 302: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III

6

AC 410: AUDITING

6

AC 430: ADVANCED TAX—CORPORATE

6

AC 465: ADVANCED FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

79

Curriculum
Tax Accountancy
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

6

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
24

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
99

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

80

48
48

Concentration Requirements - Tax Accountancy
AC 302: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III

6

AC 410: AUDITING

6

AC 430: ADVANCED TAX—CORPORATE

6

AC 450: ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

81

Curriculum
Managerial Accountancy
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

6

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
24

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
99

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

82

48
48

Concentration Requirements - Managerial Accountancy
AC 302: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III

6

AC 410: AUDITING

6

AC 420: COST ACCOUNTING

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to
MT 217: Finance must complete the course to satisfy prerequisite requirements for MT 482: Financial Statement Analysis.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

83

Curriculum
Auditing/Forensic Accountancy
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

6

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
24

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
99

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

84

48
48

Concentration Requirements - Auditing/Forensic Accountancy
AC 302: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III

6

AC 410: AUDITING

6

AC 450: ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

6

AC 465: ADVANCED FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

85

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue positions in a variety of business fields. The curriculum is designed to provide a solid foundation in management and helps you develop teamwork and leadership skills as well as the ability to motivate people and communicate effectively. Decision-making and problemsolving skills are also emphasized.

Concentrations
You can personalize your degree in business administration by focusing electives on a particular concentration. Concentrations consist of a minimum of four 300- or 400-level courses and allow you to concentrate on your career interests.

Accelerated MBA Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in business administration, consider the accelerated MBA option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Society for Human Resources Management Acknowledgement
The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has acknowledged that the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in human resources fully aligns with SHRM’s HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. The HR Curriculum Guidebook and
Templates were developed by SHRM to define the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by HR students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The guidelines—created in 2006 and revalidated in 2010 and 2013—are part of SHRM’s academic initiative to define HR education standards taught in university business schools and help universities develop degree programs that follow these standards.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Evaluate information management, planning, and control in business environments.
2. Analyze organizational processes and procedures in a variety of business settings.
3. Synthesize appropriate principles, concepts, and frameworks for making ethical decisions.
4. Assess the roles that structure, management, and leadership play in organizational performance.
5. Evaluate how economics, government, and law affect value creation in the global context.
6. Evaluate career skills in the field of business and management.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

86

Policies
Progression Requirements
Accelerated MBA Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program and are interested in continuing on to pursue a Kaplan
University Master of Business Administration (MBA), you may matriculate into a shortened version of the graduate program.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program, and if you meet the below criteria, you may apply for entry to the University's MBA program. If accepted, you will have the following MBA courses waived:


GB 518: Financial Accounting Principles and Analysis



GB 520: Strategic Human Resource Management



GB 530: Marketing Management



GB 540: Economics for Global Decision Makers



GB 550: Financial Management

In order to qualify for the accelerated MBA option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Complete your undergraduate coursework in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program with a minimum cumulative
GPA of 3.2.
2. Present a resume indicating at least 2 years of applicable work experience.
3. Complete the following courses and obtain a grade of “B” or better in each course:

AC 116: Accounting II


AC 301: Intermediate Accounting II



BU 204: Macroeconomics



HR 485: Strategic Human Resource Management



MT 217: Finance



MT 445: Managerial Economics



MT 450: Marketing Management



MT 480: Corporate Finance OR MT 482: Financial Statement Analysis

If you have not completed AC 116, BU 204, or MT 217 as part of your undergraduate program, but meet all other criteria, your acceptance to the accelerated option is at the discretion of the Dean of the School of Business and Information Technology.

87

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

88

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

89

Curriculum
Accelerated MBA Option
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

90

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Accelerated MBA Option
AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

6

HR 485: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

6

MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following:
MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to
AC 300: Intermediate Accounting I will need to complete the course beyond the minimum degree requirements.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

91

Curriculum
Financial Analysis
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

92

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Financial Analysis
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

93

Curriculum
Human Resources
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

94

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Human Resources
HR 400: EMPLOYMENT AND STAFFING

6

HR 410: EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

6

HR 420: EMPLOYMENT LAW

6

Choose one of the following:
HR 435: COMPENSATION

6

HR 485: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan. This program is fully aligned with the HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates of the Society for Human Resource Management.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

95

Curriculum
Information System Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

96

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Information System Management
IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

MT 300: MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

6

MT 451: MANAGING TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

97

Curriculum
Investment
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

98

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Investment
MT 422: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

6

MT 423: ASSET ALLOCATION AND MUTUAL FUNDS

6

MT 424: INTRODUCTION TO DERIVATIVES AND RISK
MANAGEMENT

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

99

Curriculum
Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

100

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Management
HR 400: EMPLOYMENT AND STAFFING

6

MT 340: CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND TEAM DYNAMICS

6

Choose one of the following:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

101

Curriculum
Marketing
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

102

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Marketing
MT 330: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

6

MT 359: ADVERTISING, PROMOTION, PR—INTEGRATED
MARKETING COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

6

MT 459: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

6

Choose one of the following:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

103

Curriculum
New Media/Internet Marketing
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

104

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - New Media/Internet Marketing
MT 357: E-MARKETING

6

MT 358: SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING

6

MT 359: ADVERTISING, PROMOTION, PR—INTEGRATED
MARKETING COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

105

Curriculum
Procurement
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

106

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Procurement
MT 300: MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 475: QUALITY MANAGEMENT

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

107

Curriculum
Project Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

108

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Project Management
IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 401: PROJECT MANAGEMENT II

6

MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 475: QUALITY MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

109

Curriculum
Real Estate
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

110

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Real Estate
MT 361: FOUNDATIONS OF REAL ESTATE PRACTICE

6

MT 431: REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND ETHICS

6

MT 432: REAL ESTATE LAW

6

MT 453: PROFESSIONAL SELLING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

111

Curriculum
Risk Management and Insurance
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

112

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Risk Management and Insurance
MT 426: PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

6

MT 427: FUNDAMENTALS OF PROPERTY AND LIABILITY
INSURANCE

6

MT 428: FUNDAMENTALS OF LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE

6

MT 453: PROFESSIONAL SELLING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

113

Curriculum
Sales Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

114

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Sales Management
MT 453: PROFESSIONAL SELLING

6

MT 454: SERVICES MARKETING

6

MT 455: SALESFORCE MANAGEMENT

6

MT 459: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

115

Curriculum
Supply Chain Management and Logistics
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

116

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Supply Chain Management and
Logistics
MT 433: GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

6

MT 434: LOGISTICS AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 436: PURCHASING AND VENDOR MANAGEMENT

6

MT 437: STRATEGIC WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT

6

MT 475: QUALITY MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

117

Curriculum
Wealth Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 460: MANAGEMENT POLICY AND STRATEGY

6

MT 490: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT

6

MT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

LS 312: ETHICS AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 355: MARKETING RESEARCH

118

6

MT 450: MARKETING MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 400: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

6

MT 435: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Wealth Management
MT 421: FINANCIAL PLANNING

6

MT 426: PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

6

MT 453: PROFESSIONAL SELLING

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

119

Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
This program will equip you to master the foundational goals of cybersecurity. You will apply current technical tools and methodologies to solve security problems. Upon completion, you will be able to evaluate security trends, recognize best practices, and understand IT security products and threats.
You will explore the depth and breadth of materials to enable you to pursue many of the critical certifications recognized by the information assurance community and for Department of Defense (DoD) personnel, as mandated by DoD Directive 8570.1.
The following educational objectives are approved by information technology faculty and the Advisory Board:


Our graduates will be able to apply current industry-accepted practices and new and emerging practices when solving real-world information technology problems in the industry.



Our graduates will be able to exhibit teamwork and effective communication skills.



Our graduates will be able to ethically and appropriately apply knowledge of societal impacts of information technology in the course of career-related activities.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. The duration of the program depends on transfer credit. Any combination of prior learning credit will not exceed 75 percent of the credits required for the degree. You are responsible for providing the University with an official copy of all transcripts for prior college credit. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Technology Skills: Apply current technical tools and methodologies to secure systems.
2. Client Specifications: Analyze users’ security issues.
3. System Specifications: Design secure information systems.
4. Technology Analysis: Evaluate information security trends, practices, and products.
5. Security Analysis: Measure and assess risk management practices and policies for an enterprise network.
6. Design and Develop: Maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information systems.
7. Professional Development: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of professional development in the field of cybersecurity.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Progression Requirements
Students may be eligible to transfer into the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program from the Bachelor of Science in
Cybersecurity.

120

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

40

Major Requirements
IT 104: INTRODUCTION TO CYBERSECURITY

5

IT 262: CERTIFIED ETHICAL HACKING I

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 275: LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 277: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY
PROFESSIONAL I

5

IT 279: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY
PROFESSIONAL II

5

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 316: COMPUTER FORENSICS

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 374: LINUX SECURITY

6

IT 388: ROUTING AND SWITCHING I

6

IT 390: INTRUSION DETECTION AND INCIDENCE RESPONSE

6

IT 395: CERTIFIED ETHICAL HACKING II

6

IT 400: ETHICS IN CYBERSECURITY

6

IT 410: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY
PROFESSIONAL III

6

IT 411: DIGITAL FORENSICS

6

IT 412: INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY

6

IT 484: CYBERSECURITY POLICIES

6

121

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 479: BACHELOR’S-LEVEL CYBERSECURITY INTERNSHIP
IT 497: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN CYBERSECURITY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
117

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

18

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

23

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

122

180

Bachelor of Science in Finance
Description and Outcomes
Contact your admissions representative for program start date.
The Bachelor of Science in Finance program focuses on helping students gain technical knowledge and skills in a range of financial areas. You should develop an understanding of the factors that influence financial decision making and are provided with opportunities to develop and implement your critical thinking skills to solve in-depth financial problems.
The general program is designed to aid you in the development of specific skills in the areas of financial planning, corporate finance, banking, insurance, real estate, financial markets, and investment management. You have the option to select from one of the six specializations.
Completion of this program may be especially beneficial if you wish to pursue opportunities in corporate finance or a variety of financial service sector occupations.

Concentrations
This program includes six concentrations: investments, wealth management, insurance, real estate, general finance, and an accelerated Master of
Science in Finance (MSF) option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.
If you have not completed AC 116, BU 204, or MT 217 as part of your undergraduate program, but meet all other criteria, your acceptance to the accelerated option is at the discretion of the Dean of the School of Business and Information Technology.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Finance program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Perform financial analysis using quantitative concepts and techniques.
2. Interpret financial statements and ratios.
3. Examine investment and financial risk.
4. Analyze financial theory and practices.
5. Apply legislation, regulations, and principles of practice to financial scenarios.
6. Communicate professionally through writing and presentations with stakeholders.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
At this time, if you reside in one of the following states you may not enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Finance: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware,
Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, Tennessee, or Wisconsin.

123

Progression Requirements
Accelerated Master of Science in Finance (MSF) Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Finance program and are interested in continuing on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of
Science in Finance (MSF), you may matriculate into a shortened version of the graduate program.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Finance program, and if you meet the below criteria, you may apply for entry to the
University's MSF program and will have the following MSF courses waived:


GF 510: Risk Analysis and Management



GF 570: Portfolio Management



GB 540: Economics for Global Decision Makers or GF 590: Personal Financial Planning

In order to qualify for the accelerated MSF option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Complete your undergraduate coursework in the Bachelor of Science in Finance program with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.20.
2. Complete the following courses and obtain a grade of “B” or better in each course:

124

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Accelerated Master of Science in Finance Option
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT
FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
106

125

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - Accelerated Master of Science in
Finance Option
MT 422: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

6

MT 424: INTRODUCTION TO DERIVATIVES AND RISK
MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following courses:
MT 421: FINANCIAL PLANNING

6

MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

126

180

Curriculum
General Finance
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT

6

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

106

127

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - General Finance
Choose any combination of three courses:
MT 361: FOUNDATIONS OF REAL ESTATE PRACTICE

6

MT 421: FINANCIAL PLANNING

6

MT 422: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

6

MT 423: ASSET ALLOCATION AND MUTUAL FUNDS

6

MT 424: INTRODUCTION TO DERIVATIVES AND RISK
MANAGEMENT

6

MT 426: PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

6

MT 427: FUNDAMENTALS OF PROPERTY AND LIABILITY
INSURANCE

6

MT 428: FUNDAMENTALS OF LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE

6

MT 431: REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND ETHICS

6

MT 432: REAL ESTATE LAW

6

MT 445: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

6

MT 453: PROFESSIONAL SELLING

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

128

180

Curriculum
Insurance
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT

6

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

106

129

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - Insurance
MT 426: PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

6

MT 427: FUNDAMENTALS OF PROPERTY AND LIABILITY
INSURANCE

6

MT 428: FUNDAMENTALS OF LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

130

180

Curriculum
Investments
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT

6

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

106

131

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - Investments
MT 422: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

6

MT 423: ASSET ALLOCATION AND MUTUAL FUNDS

6

MT 424: INTRODUCTION TO DERIVATIVES AND RISK
MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

132

180

Curriculum
Real Estate
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT

6

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

106

133

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - Real Estate
MT 361: FOUNDATIONS OF REAL ESTATE PRACTICE

6

MT 431: REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND ETHICS

6

MT 432: REAL ESTATE LAW

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

134

180

Curriculum
Wealth Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

LS 311: BUSINESS LAW

6

MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 480: CORPORATE FINANCE

6

MT 481: FINANCIAL MARKETS

6

MT 482: FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS

6

MT 483: INVESTMENTS
300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

6
18

Choose one of the following courses:
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER
ENGAGEMENT

6

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

106

135

Open Elective Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVE

5

300/400 LEVEL: OPEN ELECTIVES

36

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

41

Concentration Requirements - Wealth Management
MT 421: FINANCIAL PLANNING

6

MT 422: PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

6

MT 426: PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

136

180

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program is to help you prepare for career advancement in the information technology field by providing the technical knowledge, and communication, critical thinking, and creative skills relevant to the modern workplace. The degree program is designed to help you develop a working knowledge of information technology (IT) concepts, tools, and methods as well as the leading-edge technologies needed to design information systems. In addition, courses teach you how to apply technical competencies to solve business problems. Whether your immediate educational goals are satisfied by the completion of a bachelor's degree or you are planning to pursue study in the information technology field beyond the baccalaureate level, this degree program may be for you.
The following program educational objectives are approved by information technology faculty and the Advisory Board:


Our graduates will be able to evaluate and apply current IT best practices when solving real- world problems in complex IT environments.



Our graduates will be able to demonstrate their ability to work within diverse teams, and to use effective written and oral communication skills when analyzing and designing IT solutions.



Our graduates will be able to assess the impact of information technology on business processes and apply effective and ethically sound solutions locally and globally.

Concentrations
You can personalize your degree in IT by focusing electives on a particular concentration. Concentrations consist of a minimum of four courses and allow you to concentrate on your individual career interests. When enrolling in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, you may select from the following concentrations: business, network administration, database management, information security and assurance, and multiplatform software development.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Technology Skills: Apply current technical tools and methodologies to solve problems.
2. Client Specifications: Analyze users' technical issues.
3. System Specifications: Design information systems.
4. Technology Analysis: Evaluate IT trends, practices, and products.
5. Business Analysis: Evaluate the potential impact of information systems and technology on business processes.
6. Project Management: Apply project management practices, tools, and methods.
7. Professional Development: Recognize the ethical considerations for IT professionals locally and globally as they develop in their careers.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

137

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

138

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

139

Curriculum
Business
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

140

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Business
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MT 217: FINANCE

5

MT 219: MARKETING

5

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

141

Curriculum
Database Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

142

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Database Management
IT 350: DATABASE MODELING AND DESIGN WITH TRANSACTSQL (T-SQL)

6

IT 358: INTERMEDIATE ORACLE QUERY DESIGN

6

IT 458: ORACLE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

143

Curriculum
Information Security and Assurance
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

144

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Information Security and Assurance
IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP

5

IT 316: COMPUTER FORENSICS

6

IT 390: INTRUSION DETECTION AND INCIDENCE RESPONSE

6

IT 411: DIGITAL FORENSICS

6

IT 412: INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

145

Curriculum
Network Administration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

146

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Network Administration
IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP

5

IT 375: WINDOWS ENTERPRISE ADMINISTRATION

6

IT 388: ROUTING AND SWITCHING I

6

IT 471: ROUTING AND SWITCHING II

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

147

Curriculum
Multiplatform Software Development
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I

6

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

6

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE

6

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE

6

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS

6

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

6

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
94

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

148

53

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

53

Concentration Requirements - Multiplatform Software Development
IT 213: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—INTRODUCTORY

5

IT 232: SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—
INTERMEDIATE

5

IT 350: DATABASE MODELING AND DESIGN WITH TRANSACTSQL (T-SQL)

6

IT 391: ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING WEB
AND MOBILITY

6

IT 481: ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

6

IT 488: SOFTWARE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT USING AGILE

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

149

Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Accounting program is to prepare you with knowledge of accounting theories and principles relevant to the application of accounting functions in business. You will have the opportunity to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to help you enter the field of accounting and pursue career advancement.
Course content includes the application of accounting principles, payroll processing procedures, financial statement preparation, and tax preparation according to federal and state regulations. Computer software relevant to the accounting field is emphasized throughout the program.
The curriculum teaches you to utilize accounting software applications, and analyze, record, and interpret accounting information based upon industry guidelines.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Accounting program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Regulations: Recognize the impact of state and federal laws and regulations on business.
2. Management: Define the various tasks and responsibilities of managers in the organization.
3. Control: Recognize basic financial and accounting data that influence business activities.
4. Finance: Analyze financial data and demonstrate the ability to make informed financial decisions.
5. Accounting Solutions: Identify solutions to various accounting business demands by applying Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
(GAAP).
6. Technology: Use technology and software applications appropriate to the business environment.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

150

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

AB 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

AB 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

5

AB 256: FEDERAL TAX

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

AB 298: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING

5

Choose one of the following:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL
CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
40

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

35

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

35

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

151

Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue positions in a variety of business fields. The curriculum is designed to provide a solid foundation in management and helps you develop teamwork and leadership skills as well as the ability to motivate people and communicate effectively. Decision-making and problemsolving skills are also emphasized.

Concentrations
You can personalize your degree in business administration by choosing a concentration. Concentrations consist of four 100- or 200-level courses and allow you to concentrate on your career interests.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Regulations: Recognize the impact of state and federal laws and regulations on business.
2. Management: Define the various tasks and responsibilities of managers in organizations.
3. Marketing: Discuss marketing principles used in business strategies.
4. Technology: Use technology and software applications appropriate to business environments.
5. Business Principles: Apply basic economic, finance, and accounting principles to organizational environments.
6. Career Skills: Analyze career skills in the field of business and management.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Upon enrollment in the Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration, you are required to select a concentration. If you are interested in completing a custom concentration, you may be required to complete the Concentration Application prior to enrollment. You may only enroll in the custom concentration option if you have previously completed a specific set of courses approved by the Dean of the School of Business and
Information Technology through an articulation arrangement.

152

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Business
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES
100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

5
20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Business
AB 116: ACCOUNTING II

5

AB 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

AB 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

153

Curriculum
Customer Service
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Customer Service
AB 202: BUILDING CUSTOMER SALES AND LOYALTY

5

AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CM 214: PUBLIC SPEAKING FOR THE PROFESSIONAL

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

154

90

Curriculum
Entrepreneurship
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Entrepreneurship
AB 202: BUILDING CUSTOMER SALES AND LOYALTY

5

AB 207: STARTING A BUSINESS

5

AB 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

155

Curriculum
Health Club Operations
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Health Club Operations
AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

EF 205: SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS OF EXERCISE AND FITNESS

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

156

90

Curriculum
Hospitality Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Hospitality Management
AB 117: GLOBAL HOSPITALITY

5

AB 206: HOTEL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

5

AB 213: FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT

5

AB 223: CONVENTION SALES AND SERVICES

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

157

Curriculum
Information Processing
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Information Processing
CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 153: SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

158

90

Curriculum
Meeting and Event Planning
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Meeting and Event Planning
AB 213: FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT

5

AB 223: CONVENTION SALES AND SERVICES

5

AB 230: FOUNDATIONS OF CONFERENCE AND EVENT PLANNING

5

AB 270: ADVANCED MEETING PLANNING

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

159

Curriculum
Office Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Office Management
AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

AB 230: FOUNDATIONS OF CONFERENCE AND EVENT PLANNING

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

160

90

Curriculum
Retail Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Retail Management
AB 102: PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING

5

AB 202: BUILDING CUSTOMER SALES AND LOYALTY

5

AB 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

161

Curriculum
Sales
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Sales
AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CM 214: PUBLIC SPEAKING FOR THE PROFESSIONAL

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

162

90

Curriculum
Small Business Management
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

AB 217: FINANCE

5

AB 219: MARKETING

5

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS

5

MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES

5

100/200 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES

20

Choose one of the following courses:
CS 113: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE BUSINESS
PROFESSIONAL

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
60

Online students will take the program-specific Academic Strategies course.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Concentration Requirements - Small Business Management
AB 122: PAYROLL ACCOUNTING

5

AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

Choose one of the following courses:
AB 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

5

AB 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

163

Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology
Description and Outcomes
The Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology program is designed to prepare you with the general education, applied knowledge, technical skills, and communication skills to pursue a wide range of entry-level positions in the information technology field including the areas of general IT, multiplatform software development, and networking. Courses help you develop the foundational skills to install and maintain computer networks, troubleshoot hardware and software problems, manage databases, and develop web pages.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Technical Skills: Use technical skills and methods to solve problems.
2. Client Specifications: Explore users' technical needs.
3. Application:Construct information technology solutions.
4. Knowledge: Understand technology trends, practices, and products.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Upon enrollment in the Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology, you are required to select a concentration.

164

Degree Plan
Curriculum
IT Generalist
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

18

Major Requirements
IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 261: DESKTOP ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 296: ASSOCIATE'S-LEVEL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
INTERNSHIP
IT 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
30

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

42

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

42

Concentration Requirements - IT Generalist
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

165

Curriculum
Multiplatform Software Development
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

18

Major Requirements
IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 261: DESKTOP ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 296: ASSOCIATE'S-LEVEL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
INTERNSHIP
IT 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
30

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

42

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

42

Concentration Requirements - Multiplatform Software Development
AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

2

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 213: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—INTRODUCTORY

5

IT 214: FOUNDATIONS OF WEB DESIGN

5

IT 232: SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—
INTERMEDIATE

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 247: FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB GRAPHICS

5

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

166

90

Curriculum
Networking
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

18

Major Requirements
IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 261: DESKTOP ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 296: ASSOCIATE'S-LEVEL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
INTERNSHIP
IT 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
30

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

42

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

42

Concentration Requirements - Networking
IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

IT 388: ROUTING AND SWITCHING I

6

IT 471: ROUTING AND SWITCHING II

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the open electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

167

Cisco Networks Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Cisco Networks Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions working with Cisco networks. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including network administration, TCP/IP protocols, and network routers and switches. You will configure and troubleshoot network routers and switches using live and simulated labs.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam. Refer to the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.
Program Length
The Cisco Networks Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 27 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam.

168

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP

5

IT 388: ROUTING AND SWITCHING I

6

IT 471: ROUTING AND SWITCHING II

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

27

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

27

169

Computer Forensics Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Computer Forensics Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions in the field of computer forensics. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including intrusion detection systems, incidence response strategies, computer forensics, and forensic techniques.
You will explore computer forensic software and study to gain proficiency in these programs.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, and the EnCase Certified Examiner
(EnCE) certification exams Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information. Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Computer Forensics Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 28 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University’s general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, and EnCase Certified
Examiner (EnCE) certification exams.

170

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

IT 316: COMPUTER FORENSICS

6

IT 390: INTRUSION DETECTION AND INCIDENCE RESPONSE

6

IT 411: DIGITAL FORENSICS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

28

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

28

171

Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and skills to pursue entry-level positions in human resources. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key human resource areas including employee recruitment, employee training and development, compensation and reward systems, and employment law.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification exam. Refer to the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 30 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon graduation, you may be eligible to take the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification exam.

172

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
HR 400: EMPLOYMENT AND STAFFING

6

HR 410: EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

6

HR 420: EMPLOYMENT LAW

6

HR 435: COMPENSATION

6

HR 485: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

30

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

30

173

Information Security Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Information Security Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions in the field of information security. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including network operating systems, network security, threat detection and response methods, disaster recovery planning, cryptography, and information security and risk management.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, and Certified Information Systems
Security Professional (CISSP) certification exams. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Information Security Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 21 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, and Certified Information
Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification exams.

174

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY

5

IT 412: INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

21

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

21

175

Microsoft Operating Systems Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Microsoft Operating Systems Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions working with Microsoft operating systems. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including PC configuration and maintenance, desktop administration, network administration, and Active Directory configuration. You will explore Microsoft operating systems and study to gain proficiency in these systems.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for various Microsoft certification exams. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and
National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Microsoft Operating Systems Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 26 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take various Microsoft certification exams.

176

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

5

IT 261: DESKTOP ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS

5

IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION

5

IT 375: WINDOWS ENTERPRISE ADMINISTRATION

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

26

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

26

177

Multiplatform Software Development Postbaccalaureate
Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Multiplatform Software Development Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions in the field of web design. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including website design, web graphics, web technologies and strategies, and multimedia. You will explore various types of web authoring software and study to gain proficiency in these programs.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the CIW Associate Design Specialist certification exam.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Multiplatform Software Development Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 25 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University’s general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Progression Requirements
If you are enrolled in the Multiplatform Software Development Postbaccalaureate Certificate, you will have the prerequisite of IT 111:
Programming Fundamentals for Beginners waived for IT 213: Software Development Concepts—Introductory and IT 214: Foundations of Web
Design.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the CIW Web Foundation Series of Certifications.

178

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

5

IT 213: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—INTRODUCTORY

5

IT 214: FOUNDATIONS OF WEB DESIGN

5

IT 232: SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—
INTERMEDIATE

5

IT 247: FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB GRAPHICS

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

25

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

25

179

Oracle Database Administration Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Oracle Database Administration Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is to prepare you with the critical knowledge and technical skills to pursue entry-level positions in the fields of database administration or database development. The certificate program is designed to provide foundational knowledge of key information technology areas including relational database management systems, relational database design, SQL and PL/SQL programming languages, database query design, and Oracle database administration. You will explore database management software and study to gain proficiency in these programs.
This certificate program could also help you prepare for the Oracle DBA Assessment Exam. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National
Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Oracle Database Administration Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 28 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the Oracle DBA Assessment Exam.

180

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS

5

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS

5

IT 350: DATABASE MODELING AND DESIGN WITH TRANSACTSQL (T-SQL)

6

IT 358: INTERMEDIATE ORACLE QUERY DESIGN

6

IT 458: ORACLE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

28

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

28

181

School of Health Sciences
Mission
Mission Statement
The School of Health Sciences is committed to preparing our students to become contributing members of the rapidly evolving health professions and the communities they serve. The knowledge, skills, and abilities gained through the health sciences programs prepare students to become effective and professional communicators, analytical problem solvers, and to embrace the challenges of a diverse community. The curriculum combines these skills with industry-specific standards that enable graduates to excel in this honorable field of service.

General Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.

International Students
If you are an international student, you cannot enroll in a School of Health Sciences program that requires a clinical placement without prior approval of the Dean. In addition, you must have an approved criminal background check on file with the University prior to the first day of your first term. You will also be required to take a second criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, externship, or practicum site.
You are responsible for the cost of the criminal background check.

Programs With a Required Clinical, Externship, or Practicum Experience
If you are unable to pass a criminal background check, you are not eligible to be fully enrolled in a School of Health Sciences program that requires completion of a clinical, externship, or practicum experience. Please refer to the Additional Requirements for Undergraduate Programs section under Admissions Requirements. You will be required to complete a second criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, externship, or practicum site.

Progression Requirements
General progression requirements for programs in the School of Health Sciences are noted below.

Bachelor's and Associate's Degree Programs
1. Transfer credit applied toward major School of Health Sciences courses must have been completed within 10 years of the start of your
School of Health Sciences program. This provision may be waived at the discretion of the Dean of the program based on a review of submitted coursework or professional experience.
2. You must achieve a minimum grade of "S" (satisfactory) for the clinical components of courses.
3. You must provide required documentation for the clinical course, practicum, and externship placement including, but not limited to, health assessments and an application for clinical placement. Specific policies and procedures for submitting required documentation can be found in the appropriate Student Clinical Handbook. Failure to submit appropriate documentation by the deadline may result in a delay in placement for the clinical course, practicum, or externship and/or dismissal from the University.

Online Programs With a Required Clinical, Externship, or Practicum Experience
1. In the event that the University is unable to schedule you into the required externship, practicum, or clinical experience, there may be a delay between the time you end classes and begin the externship, practicum, or clinical experience. In this case, the Dean of the School of
Health Sciences may grant an administrative leave of absence.
2. At the discretion of the University, externship, practicum, or clinical sites may be secured outside of your immediate residential area. You will be responsible for costs associated with transportation to the externship, practicum, or clinical site.

182

3. In the event that you have not met preclinical placement requirements, a one-term clinical leave of absence may be granted. The School of
Health Sciences Clinical Placement Team must approve the request for a clinical leave of absence.

Oregon Health Professions Requirements
Effective July 1, 2014, students completing certain types of clinical training in the state of Oregon are required to complete a standardized set of administrative requirements prior to beginning the clinical experience. These requirements include, but are not limited to, immunizations, screenings, and trainings listed by the Oregon Health Authority. Students are responsible for the costs associated with completion of these requirements. Additional information can be found on the Oregon Health Authority website. Health sciences students should work with the
Health Sciences Clinical Placement Team to determine what requirements will need to be completed. Nursing students should work with the
Practicum Manager to determine what requirements will need to be completed.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are enrolled in a School of Health Sciences bachelor's degree program and wish to continue on to pursue a School of Health Sciences master’s degree program, you may be eligible to take up to five graduate-level courses in place of open or major electives.
In order to qualify for an accelerated master's degree option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Have completed a minimum of 135 quarter credit hours in a School of Health Sciences bachelor's degree program, including any credits received for prior learning.
2. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
3. Obtain a grade of "B" or better in each of the master's-level courses and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 while completing the master's-level courses; failure to meet this requirement will result in removal from the accelerated master's degree option.
Upon successful completion of the bachelor's degree program, you may apply for entry to the relevant Kaplan University master's degree program. If accepted, you will transfer in the graduate courses completed as part of your undergraduate program and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.
Consult with your Education Advisor for additional information, to ensure that you are eligible for this option, and to apply for entry. You should also discuss any financial aid implications with your Financial Aid Officer.
You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan University bachelor's degree.

Graduation Requirements
You must meet the below graduation requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
1. Complete with a passing grade all requirements for your program of study, within the maximum time frame permitted, and attain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.
2. Comply with all applicable policies and requirements related to the clinical educational experiences.

183

Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness program is designed to prepare you to pursue a variety of career opportunities in health care and health and wellness-related industries. Additionally, it provides you with a solid undergraduate foundation to pursue further graduate study or first professional programs. The program's curriculum focuses on building content knowledge and skills in the broad areas of health care and health and wellness. It also highlights overall concepts, values, research methods, and applications that could prepare you to pursue a career in health care or health and wellness.
A defining feature of the curriculum is the exploration of diverse approaches to health and wellness including the integration of mind, body, and spirit. Courses teach you to critically evaluate the current scientific literature and research in wellness, prevention, and complementary health care practices. The program is designed to help you apply principles of healthy living to the education of individuals and communities, and focuses on foundational knowledge and skills upon which to build additional competencies. It also encourages the development of administrative, ethical, and professional skills that may enable you to pursue leadership positions in the increasingly diverse health care field.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor’s and master's degree in the health sciences, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the general Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and historical trends in nutrition, exercise science, health psychology, stress management, and complementary and alternative medicine.
2. Application: Apply the concepts, principles, and methods of nutrition, exercise science, health psychology, stress management, and complementary and alternative medicine to designing health and wellness promotion programs.
3. Research Methods: Critically evaluate current research in nutrition, exercise science, health psychology, stress management, and complementary and alternative medicine.
4. Standards and Values: Employ professional standards, ethical practices, and legal standards in the health care field.
5. Global Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of multicultural literacy in the fields of health care and wellness promotion.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

184

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
EF 310: CURRENT TRENDS IN EXERCISE AND FITNESS—AGING
WELL ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN

6

HW 310: COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

6

HW 315: MODELS FOR HEALTH AND WELLNESS

6

HW 320: CONTEMPORARY DIET AND NUTRITION

6

HW 410: STRESS—CRITICAL ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT AND
PREVENTION

6

HW 420: CREATING WELLNESS—PSYCHOLOGICAL AND
SPIRITUAL ASPECTS OF HEALING

6

HW 425: HEALTH AND WELLNESS PROGRAMMING—DESIGN AND
ADMINISTRATION

6

100/200/300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
HW 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

12
6
60

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

87

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

87

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Master of Health Care
Administration or Master of Public Health option will take up to five graduatelevel courses in addition to selected undergraduate elective.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

185

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration program is designed to address the growing need for well-prepared, entry-level health care administrators. The objective of the program is to provide you with the foundation to work within the health care industry as well as prepare you to pursue entry-level supervisory roles in health care organizations.
The curriculum is designed to help you gain a strong foundation in the core disciplines of health care administration, including content knowledge and skills in the areas of administration and management, and understand important concepts and processes. Coursework teaches foundational knowledge and skills as well as overall concepts, values, research methods, and applications that could prepare you to pursue a leadership career in health administration in the public sector or private industry. The program is taught by faculty with real-world knowledge and experience and helps you develop expertise in core health areas.
If you are interested in pursuing entry-level management positions in health care administration, you may be an ideal candidate for the Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration program. Upon graduation, you could pursue administrative positions within the health care industry in organizations such as: insurance companies, hospitals, long-term care facilities, public health agencies, outpatient facilities, physician offices, mental health organizations, and other types of health organizations. The Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration program could also provide an educational foundation if you plan on pursuing a master's degree in order to apply for executive health care positions.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in the health sciences, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the general Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration degree program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate a sound foundational knowledge and understanding of principles and practice in health care regarding administration, management, law, economics, and policy.
2. Research Methods and Critical Thinking Skills: Demonstrate competency in industry-specific knowledge and skills related to research methods, critical thinking, and problem solving in health care settings.
3. Interdisciplinary Integration: Apply principles of management needed to work in teams, build cross-functional teams, and facilitate collaborative decision making.
4. Operations: Apply best practices in decision making within the functional areas of health care management.
5. Health Care Administration: Demonstrate an understanding of the forces impacting health delivery systems and the effective and efficient management of health care.
6. Ethics and Professionalism: Analyze the professional, ethical, and legal standards of health care administrative practice.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Progression Requirements
You will be withdrawn from the program if unable to successfully complete HA 499: Bachelor's Capstone in Health Care Administration on the second attempt.

186

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
HA 405: LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS IN HEALTH CARE

6

HA 415: HEALTH CARE POLICY AND ECONOMICS

6

HA 425: OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS AND QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

6

HI 300: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS FOR
HEALTH CARE

6

HS 410: ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTH CARE

6

HS 440: FINANCE FOR HEALTH CARE

6

HS 450: STRATEGIC PLANNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTH CARE

6

100/200/300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
HA 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH CARE
ADMINISTRATION
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

12
6
60

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

87

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

87

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Master of Health Care
Administration or Master of Public Health option will take up to five graduatelevel courses in addition to selected undergraduate elective.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

187

Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The objective of the Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to be an innovative and adaptable critical thinker and problem solver. Individuals that possess these qualities are capable of using available services and technologies to support operations, management, and decision-making initiatives within the health information field. In addition, the curriculum encourages lifelong learning and addresses the evolving professional skills of baccalaureate degree students.
Upon graduation, you may pursue positions that require you to perform either technical or management duties within the health information field. Typical duties may include overall department management; generation and analysis of health care data; implementation of quality improvement processes, risk management techniques, compliance strategies, and reimbursement procedures; research; and evaluation of legal issues. Employment opportunities may exist within hospitals, long-term care facilities, physicians' offices, health maintenance organizations, insurance companies, home health care, consulting companies, computer software companies, and government agencies.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Externship Experience
This program blends online coursework with on-ground experience. You must complete a 120-hour externship in a hospital or other health care facility to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will receive a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the principles of planning, designing, managing, and evaluating electronic information systems.
2. Research Methods and Critical Thinking Skills: Apply research skills and critical thinking to create solutions for health care issues.
3. Health Care Administration: Demonstrate knowledge of the forces affecting health care delivery and health information systems.
4. Operations: Apply best practices in decision making regarding the management of health information.
5. Ethics and Professionalism: Employ the professional, ethical, and legal standards of health information management.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

188

Policies
Admissions Requirements
If you are enrolling in the Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management Technology program, please refer to the school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.
To be eligible for advanced start credit in the Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management program, you must have successfully completed the Kaplan University Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology program or a Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM)-approved Associate of Applied Science in Health Information
Technology program.

189

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
HA 255: HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH CARE
ORGANIZATIONS
HI 135: LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 150: AUTOMATION OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 230: QUALITY ASSURANCE AND STATISTICS IN HEALTH
INFORMATION

5

HI 253: MEDICAL CODING I

5

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 230: HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

HI 300: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS FOR
HEALTH CARE

6

HI 305: MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH INFORMATION

6

HI 410: ADVANCED REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGY

6

HS 305: RESEARCH METHODS FOR HEALTH SCIENCES

6

HS 311: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS I

6

HS 312: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS II

6

HS 420: ADVANCED HEALTH INFORMATICS

190

5

6

HS 450: STRATEGIC PLANNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTH CARE

6

HI 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

117

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
HA 255: HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH CARE
ORGANIZATIONS

5

HI 135: LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 150: AUTOMATION OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 230: QUALITY ASSURANCE AND STATISTICS IN HEALTH
INFORMATION

5

HI 253: MEDICAL CODING I

5

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 230: HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

30

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

30

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

191

Bachelor of Science in Health Science
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Health Science program focuses on building content knowledge and skills in the broad areas of health science and health care. Coursework highlights foundational knowledge and skills as well as overall concepts, values, research methods, and applications that could prepare you to pursue a career in health care or health science. Courses teach you to apply principles of healthy living to the education of individuals and communities, and focus on foundational knowledge and skills upon which to build additional competencies. The program also encourages the development of administrative, ethical, and professional skills that are relevant to leadership positions in the increasingly diverse health care field.
The Bachelor of Science in Health Science program is designed to prepare you to pursue a variety of career opportunities in health care and health science-related industries. Additionally, it provides you with a solid undergraduate foundation to pursue further graduate study and/or professional degrees.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in the health sciences, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the general Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Health Science program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate sound foundational knowledge and an understanding of the principles of biology, chemistry, human anatomy, physiology, and disease processes as they relate to health outcomes.
2. Research Methods and Critical Thinking Skills: Demonstrate competency in medical research and inquiry using scientific methods and laboratory skills for critical thinking and problem solving in health care settings.
3. Interdisciplinary Integration: Apply principles of healthy living at the individual and community level to protect and promote optimal physical and mental health.
4. Public Health and Education: Integrate basic knowledge of the core disciplines within public health and deliver educational programs that promote public health.
5. Health Care Administration: Demonstrate an understanding of the forces impacting health delivery systems and the effective management of health care administration.
6. Ethics and Professionalism: Employ the professional, ethical, and legal standards of health care practice and interdisciplinary collaboration through leadership and community stewardship.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

192

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
HS 305: RESEARCH METHODS FOR HEALTH SCIENCES

6

HS 311: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS I

6

HS 312: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS II

6

HS 315: PRACTICES IN PUBLIC HEALTH

6

HS 320: MICROBIOLOGY

6

HS 415: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

6

HS 420: ADVANCED HEALTH INFORMATICS
100/200/300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
HS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
12
6
60

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

87

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

87

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Master of Health Care
Administration or Master of Public Health option will take up to five graduatelevel courses in addition to selected undergraduate elective.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

193

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program focuses on building content knowledge and skills in the broad areas of nutrition science and health care. The program's curriculum highlights foundational knowledge and skills as well as overall concepts, values, research methods, and applications that could prepare you to pursue a variety of career opportunities in health care and nutrition science-related industries. Courses teach you to apply principles of healthy living to the education of individuals and communities, and develop administrative, ethical, and professional skills that are relevant to leadership positions in the increasingly diverse health care field.
Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in the health sciences, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the general Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Explain the role of nutrients and food in the prevention of disease and optimization of human health.
2. Application: Evaluate an individual's nutritional status using appropriate clinical assessment strategies and interpret food science information appropriate to consumer needs.
3. Critical Thinking Skills: Assess diets, prepare foods, and promote consumption of foods to meet the nutritional needs of healthy people throughout the life cycle.
4. Clinical Skills: Plan and implement individualized, appropriate nutrition therapy for clients.
5. Analytical Skills: Analyze the impact of cultural and economic issues on client needs and dietetic practice.
6. Communication: Plan, implement, and evaluate nutrition education programs for specific audiences.
7. Ethics and Professionalism: Advocate for the provision of food and nutrition services in public policy development.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program is designed to prepare you academically to pursue a variety of nutrition-oriented careers and advanced education. However, Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program is not accredited by the Accreditation
Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), and does not qualify an individual to sit for the examination to become a Registered
Dietitian (RD). In addition, some states will not permit individuals to become licensed in nutrition and/or dietetics if they do not possess the RD credential. If you are interested in becoming licensed in your state, it is vital that you understand your state’s requirements for licensing prior to enrollment. 194

You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
In order to pursue examinations and/or preprofessional experiences, you may be required to present documentation of a health assessment/ physical examination, immunization records, drug screening results, and/or a background check. It is your responsibility to ensure that you have met all requirements prior to beginning examinations and/or preprofessional coursework/externships.

195

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
NS 305: FOOD SAFETY AND MICROBIOLOGY

6

NS 310: NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT

6

NS 321: NUTRITION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

6

NS 325: NUTRITION ACROSS THE HUMAN LIFE CYCLE

6

NS 335: NUTRITION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS

6

NS 415: FOOD SCIENCE WITH LAB

6

NS 420: NUTRITIONAL COUNSELING
100/200/300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
NS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN NUTRITION SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
12
6
60

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

87

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

87

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Master of Health Care
Administration or Master of Public Health option will take up to five graduatelevel courses in addition to selected undergraduate elective.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

196

180

Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position in the health information management field.
The curriculum is geared toward the ability to process, maintain, compile, and report health information data for patient care, reimbursement, facility planning, marketing, risk management, quality assessment, and research. The curriculum teaches medical coding and abstracting procedures, and also covers supervisory issues as well as medicolegal aspects of health information. Basic courses that address the use of computers in these areas are also part of the program.
Upon graduation, your workplace tasks may include abstracting health records and compiling reports on health care services; accurately assigning code numbers to diagnoses and procedures for indexing health data and processing bills; answering legal, government, insurance, and other inquiries for patient health information; and organizing, analyzing, and evaluating health record content for completeness and accuracy. Tasks may also include reviewing and evaluating health records to assist with meeting accreditation guidelines, releasing patient information in accordance with applicable laws, and supervising human resources.
The Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology offered online is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for
Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). Upon graduation, you may be eligible to sit for the Registered Health
Information Technician (RHIT) certification exam offered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). Refer to the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Externship Experience
This program blends online coursework with on-ground experience. You must complete a 90-hour externship in a hospital or other health care facility to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression
Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology program consists of a minimum of 92 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will receive an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Technology: Apply data management processes in support of health information operations.
2. Administrative: Exhibit computer literacy.
3. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Employ the ethical, professional, and legal standards of the health information profession.
4. Foundational Knowledge of Health Information Management: Exhibit proficiency in health information professional practice skills.
5. Professionalism: Embody professional behaviors and problem solving.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

197

Policies
Progression Requirements
1. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete HI 165: Health Information Practicum and HI 295:
Health Information Externship/Capstone on the second attempt.
2. As an online student, you must:
a. Provide notice of intent to enroll in clinical courses and externships 3 months prior to the beginning of the term in which you wish to enroll. Notification must be submitted to the Health Sciences Clinical Placement Department using the appropriate application form.
b. Complete a clinical orientation workshop and pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, practicum, or externship site.
c. Enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning Portfolio in your second term if you are interested in pursuing credit for experiential learning. You must complete the portfolio development and assessment process by the end of the third term or by the time you have accumulated 30 credits within your program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology offered online is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health
Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). Upon graduation, you are eligible to sit for the Registered Health Information
Technician (RHIT) certification exam offered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). AHIMA exams are not required for all career paths—you are ultimately responsible for determining state and federal licensure and accreditation requirements.
You may also be eligible to take the Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) certification exam sponsored by the National Healthcareer
Association (NHA), the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) certification exam sponsored by the American Health Information Management
Association (AHIMA), and the Insurance and Coding Specialist (NCICS) certification exam sponsored by the National Center for Competency
Testing (NCCT). You may be eligible for additional certifications once you attain professional experience.

198

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
HS 100: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE

5

HI 125: HEALTH CARE DELIVERY AND INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT

5

HI 135: LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 150: AUTOMATION OF HEALTH INFORMATION

5

HI 165: HEALTH INFORMATION PRACTICUM

2

HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 230: QUALITY ASSURANCE AND STATISTICS IN HEALTH
INFORMATION

5

HI 252: MEDICAL CODING I

4

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 115: SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE
PROFESSIONALS

3

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

HI 295: HEALTH INFORMATION EXTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
72

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVE

5

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

5

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

92

199

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Iowa, Maine,
Maryland, Nebraska)
Description and Outcomes
(As of September 23, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments.)
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position in the ambulatory medical field. The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is designed to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. This program concentrates on helping you acquire knowledge and develop skills in performing laboratory, clinical, and medical office procedures in a physician's office or ambulatory care clinic. The associate's degree program is designed to provide a broad education to help you develop advanced technical and communication skills.
Upon graduation from a campus-based program offered in Iowa, Maryland, or Nebraska, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical
Assistant (CMA) examination given by the American Association of Medical Assistants. Upon graduation from a campus-based program offered in Iowa, Maine, Maryland, or Nebraska, you may be eligible to take the Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) examination given by the American
Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) exam given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) exam given by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Refer to the Certification,
State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Workplace duties may include performing CLIA-waived tests, venipuncture, urinalysis, and electrocardiograms. You may also assist the physician in patient preparation and patient relations.

Clinical Experiences
The program blends online coursework with on-ground experience. You must complete an unpaid practicum or externship (160 hours) in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program consists of a minimum of 92 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of this program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Clinical: Demonstrate competencies in all aspects of medical assisting clinical practice.
2. Administrative: Exhibit proficiency in the clerical and administrative functions required of a medical assistant.
3. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Employ the professional, ethical, and legal standards in health care practice.
4. Foundational Knowledge of Allied Health Sciences: Integrate knowledge from behavioral and biological sciences as a basis for allied health practices. 5. Professionalism: Embody professional behaviors as defined by the discipline of allied health.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

200

Policies
Progression Requirements
1. Prior to externship, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved health care provider CPR training course. Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider, Heartsaver CPR and AED, Healthcare
Provider; BLS/CPR for Healthcare Public Safety; and BLS for Healthcare Providers ), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR with
AED, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider), and ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for health care providers).
2. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete the following courses on the second attempt:

MA 260: Clinical Competencies I


MA 270: Clinical Competencies II



MA 290: Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation

3. If you are a campus-based medical assisting student re-entering the program, and have not completed one or both of the Clinical
Competencies I and II courses within 6 months prior to the externship, you will need to successfully complete a competency evaluation prior to enrolling in MA 290: Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation.
4. If you are entering a campus-based CAAHEP-approved program and have completed MA 260: Clinical Competencies I, MA 270: Clinical
Competencies II, HS 210: Medical Office Management, and/or HS 220: Medical Coding and Insurance or an equivalent course within a non-CAAHEP or ABHES-approved program, these courses will be applied toward the program pending successful completion of a competency evaluation.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is designed to prepare you with clinical and administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical assistant. After completing the onsite program offered at a campus in the state of Iowa, Maryland, or Nebraska, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) examination given by the American Association of Medical Assistants. After completing the onsite program offered at a campus in the state of Iowa, Maine, Maryland, or Nebraska, you may be eligible to take the Registered
Medical Assistant examination given by the American Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) exam given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) exam given by the National
Healthcareer Association (NHA).

Nebraska Medication Aide Registry for Medical Assistants
Medical assisting students completing an externship in the state of Nebraska will be required to complete a Medication Aide application with competency validation by an approved Nebraska licensed provider prior to the externship. In addition, you will be required to provide any associated required documentation to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services that may include certified copies of court documents for criminal convictions.

201

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: COMMUNICATION COURSE

5

100/200 LEVEL: MATHEMATICS COURSE

5

200 LEVEL: COMMUNICATION COURSE
TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

5
15

Major Requirements
HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 220: MEDICAL CODING AND INSURANCE

5

HS 275: PROFESSIONALISM IN HEALTH CARE

2

MA 260: CLINICAL COMPETENCIES I

5

MA 270: CLINICAL COMPETENCIES II

5

MA 290: MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP AND EVALUATION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

Choose one of the following:
CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS
HS 100: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
62

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

202

15

92

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting (Online)
Description and Outcomes
(As of September 23, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments.)
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position in the ambulatory medical field. The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is designed to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. This program concentrates on helping you acquire knowledge and develop skills in performing laboratory, clinical, and medical office procedures in a physician's office or ambulatory care clinic. The associate's degree program is designed to provide a broad education to help you develop advanced technical and communication skills.
Upon graduation from the program, you may be eligible to take the Registered Medical Assistant examination given by the American Medical
Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) exam given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the
Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) exam given by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Refer to the Certification, State
Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Workplace duties may include performing CLIA-waived tests, venipuncture, urinalysis, and electrocardiograms. You may also assist the physician in patient preparation and patient relations.

Clinical Experiences
The program blends online coursework with on-ground experiences. If you enroll in the online program, you will need to complete clinical experiences at an approved clinical site for MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III. All students must also complete an externship (160 hours) in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program consists of a minimum of 92 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of this program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Clinical: Demonstrate competencies in all aspects of medical assisting clinical practice.
2. Administrative: Exhibit proficiency in the clerical and administrative functions required of a medical assistant.
3. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Employ the professional, ethical, and legal standards in health care practice.
4. Foundational Knowledge of Allied Health Sciences: Integrate knowledge from behavioral and biological sciences as a basis for allied health practices. 5. Professionalism: Embody professional behaviors as defined by the discipline of allied health.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admission Requirements
The University will no longer be enrolling students in the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting in specified states. Please consult with your Admissions Advisor for more information.

203

Progression Requirements
1. Prior to beginning the first clinical experience, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved health care provider CPR training course. Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider, Heartsaver CPR and AED, Healthcare Provider), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR with AED, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, CPR/
AED for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider; BLS/CPR for Healthcare Public Safety; and BLS for Healthcare Providers), and
ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for health care providers).
2. As an online student, you must:
a. Provide notice of intent to enroll in clinical courses and externships 3 months prior to the beginning of the term in which you wish to enroll. Notification must be submitted to the Health Sciences Clinical Placement Department using the appropriate application form.
b. Complete a clinical orientation workshop and pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, practicum, or externship site.
c. Enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning Portfolio in your second term if you are interested in pursuing credit for experiential learning. You must complete the portfolio development and assessment process by the end of the third term or by the time you have accumulated 30 credits within your program.
3. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete the following courses on the second attempt:

MA 265: Online Clinical Competencies I


MA 275: Online Clinical Competencies II



MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III



MA 295: Online Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation

4. If you are a medical assisting student and drop, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence longer than 6 months after beginning and prior to completing clinical coursework (MA 250: Online Professionalism in Health Care, MA 265: Online Clinical Competencies I, MA 275:
Online Clinical Competencies II, MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III, and MA 295: Online Medical Assisting Externship and
Evaluation), you will be required to re-take one or more of these courses to ensure currency of skills.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting program is designed to prepare you with clinical and administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical assistant. Upon graduation from the online program, you may be eligible to take the Registered Medical Assistant
(RMA) examination given by the American Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) exam given by the
National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) exam given by the National Healthcareer
Association (NHA).

For Washington Students
The state of Washington requires all medical assistants to be certified or registered. Eligibility for certification requires graduation from a postsecondary school or college accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency approved by the U.S. Department of Education, which includes a minimum of 720 clock hours of training in medical assisting skills, including a clinical externship of no less than 160 hours.
In addition, graduates must successfully pass, within 5 years before submitting an initial application for certification, a certification examination issued by the AAMA, AMT, NHA, or NCCT. Students who have completed all requirements except for passage of the examination may obtain interim certification, which will allow them to provide the Medical Assistant—Certified's full scope of practice. This interim certification expires when the graduate obtains the Medical Assistant—Certified credential or after 1 year and cannot be renewed.
Washington students also may obtain a Medical Assistant—Registered credential if they obtain an endorsement from a health care practitioner, clinic, or group practice. Medical Assistant—Registered individuals may perform only the medical tasks listed in their current attestation of endorsement and cannot transfer the registration to another health care practitioner, clinic, or group practice.

204

Nebraska Medication Aide Registry for Medical Assistants
Medical assisting students completing an externship in the state of Nebraska will be required to complete a Medication Aide application with competency validation by an approved Nebraska licensed provider prior to the externship. In addition, you will be required to provide any associated required documentation to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services that may include certified copies of court documents for criminal convictions.

205

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
HS 100: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE

5

HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 220: MEDICAL CODING AND INSURANCE

5

MA 250: ONLINE PROFESSIONALISM IN HEALTH CARE

1

MA 265: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES I

5

MA 275: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES II

5

MA 280: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES III

1

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

MA 295: ONLINE MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP AND
EVALUATION

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

62

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

206

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

92

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an admissions advisor.
The objective of the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue entry-level positions in medical offices. The program concentrates on helping you develop skills to submit medical claims for reimbursement, process bills, and develop a working knowledge of various insurance plans as well as administrative procedures. The associate's degree program provides a broad education to help you develop advanced technical and communication skills.
Upon graduation, you may be eligible to take the examination given by the American Medical Technologists to become a Certified Medical
Administrative Specialist (CMAS) and the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) examination sponsored by the American Health Information
Management Association (AHIMA). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information. Workplace duties may include appointment management and scheduling, medical records management, insurance processing, insurance coding and billing, and fundamentals of financial management. Competence in the field also requires that a medical office assistant display professionalism, communicate professionally, and provide instruction to patients.

Externship Experience
This program blends online coursework with an on-ground experience. If you enroll in the online program, you will need to complete a minimum
90-hour supervised externship in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management program consists of a minimum of 91 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Administration: Exhibit proficiency in clerical and administrative functions required of a medical office manager.
2. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Employ professional, ethical, and legal standards in health care practice.
3. Foundational Knowledge of Allied Health Sciences: Integrate knowledge from behavioral and biological sciences as a basis for allied health practices. 4. Professionalism: Embody professional behaviors as defined by the disciplines of allied health.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Progression Requirements
1. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete MO 290: Medical Office Management Externship and
Evaluation on the second attempt.

207

2. Prior to beginning the first clinical experience, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved health care provider CPR training course. Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider, Heartsaver CPR and AED, Healthcare Provider), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR with AED, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, CPR/
AED for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider; BLS/CPR for Healthcare Public Safety; and BLS for Healthcare Providers), and
ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for health care providers).
3. As an online student, you must:
a. Provide notice of intent to enroll in clinical courses and externships 3 months prior to the beginning of the term in which you wish to enroll. Notification must be submitted to the Health Sciences Clinical Placement Department using the appropriate application form.
b. Complete a clinical orientation workshop and pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, practicum, or externship site.
c. Enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning Portfolio in your second term if you are interested in pursuing credit for experiential learning. You must complete the portfolio development and assessment process by the end of the third term or by the time you have accumulated 30 credits within your program. .

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Office Management program is designed to prepare you with the administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical administrative specialist. After completion of the program, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical
Administrative Specialist examination given by the American Medical Technologists and the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) examination sponsored by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

208

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 252: MEDICAL CODING I

4

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 100: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE

5

HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 240: MEDICAL OFFICE ACCOUNTING

3

MO 250: MEDICAL RECORDS MANAGEMENT

3

MO 260: MEDICAL OFFICE APPLICATIONS

5

MO 270: ADVANCED MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

MO 290: MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION EXTERNSHIP AND
EVALUATION

3

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

66

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

10

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

10

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

91

209

Associate of Science in Health Science
Description and Outcomes
If you are a military student who has already received military training for medical and health science occupational specialties, the Associate of
Science in Health Science could help further your educational and career goals. The curriculum focuses on the important role of professionalism in health care, general education, and industry-related technical information and builds on your prior military medical training to help you achieve an associate's degree.
The program provides a broad education and allows you to select coursework in health science subjects including anatomy and physiology, chemistry, nutrition, nuclear medicine technology, pathophysiology, clinical skills, health education, health informatics, surgical technology, and telemetry. The program includes a capstone experience designed to prepare you for work in various health science fields within the military and could help you meet educational requirements for advancement in the military. Upon graduation, you may also pursue a number of entry-level careers within the broad field of allied health should you return to civilian life.
Refer to the Admissions Requirements section for details on program eligibility.

Program Length
The Associate of Science in Health Science program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. You must complete a specific number of credit hours at Kaplan University. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Integrate knowledge from behavioral and biological sciences as a basis for allied health practice.
2. Use current technology in a variety of health care roles.
3. Demonstrate competencies relevant to a career focus area within health sciences.
4. Execute administration skills and management processes within the interdisciplinary health care field.
5. Exhibit behavior consistent with the professional, ethical, and legal standards of allied health practice.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the following admission requirement in addition to the Kaplan University general requirements.
If you reside in the state of Minnesota, you may not enroll in the Associate of Science in Health Science program.
Enrollment in the Associate of Science in Health Science is limited to active-duty servicemembers of the U.S. military, members of the Reserve or National Guard, and veterans of the U.S. military who have completed one of the articulated military occupation training courses. A list of currently articulated occupations can be obtained by contacting Kaplan University Military Admissions.

Progression Requirements
You must meet the following progression requirement in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
You must have a military transcript on file that shows successful completion of one of the articulated military occupational specialties or training course. You may fulfill all of the major requirements, with the exception of the capstone course, via any combination of prior learning.

210

Graduation Requirements
In addition to Kaplan University's general requirements, you must also have a military transcript on file that shows successful completion of an occupational specialty.

211

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE
TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

5
20

Major Requirements
HS 290: ASSOCIATE’S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH SCIENCE

5

MAJOR ELECTIVES

45

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

20

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

212

20

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

90

Curriculum
Surgical Technology
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE
TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

5
20

Major Requirements
HS 255: STERILE PROCESSING FOR SURGICAL TECHNOLOGISTS
HS 290: ASSOCIATE’S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH SCIENCE

5
5

MAJOR ELECTIVES

40

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

20

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

20

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

213

Curriculum
Telemetry
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE
TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

5
20

Major Requirements
HS 250: CARDIAC RHYTHM ANALYSIS AND TELEMETRY
HS 290: ASSOCIATE’S CAPSTONE IN HEALTH SCIENCE

5
5

MAJOR ELECTIVES

40

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

20

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

214

20

90

Dental Assistant Diploma
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Dental Assistant Diploma program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entrylevel position in a dental office, clinic, or lab environment. The program concentrates on helping you acquire knowledge and develop skills in treatment room care of the dental patient. In addition, courses teach you how to assist the dentist, infection control and sterilization techniques, how to handle medical emergencies, the correct procedure for taking dental X-rays and making impressions, and the use of various dental instruments. Topics covered in the program also include oral evacuation, fixed prosthodontics, pharmacology and pain control, preventative dentistry, how to assist with oral surgery, and tray setups.
Instruction occurs in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings.
Upon graduation, you may seek employment as a dental assistant. Duties may include providing essential and vital auxiliary services for the dentist chairside, in the business office, and in the office laboratory.

Externship Experience
Prior to graduation, you are required to complete two externships for a minimum of 300 chairside hours. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Externships and Clinical Experiences section for additional requirements.

Program Length
You must complete a minimum of 56 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a diploma.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
To enroll in the Dental Assistant Diploma program offered at the Omaha campus, you must submit proof of CPR certification, which must remain valid for the duration of the program.

Progression Requirements
You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete the following courses on the second attempt:


DA V190: Specialty Dentistry Externship



DA Z190: General Dentistry Externship

Externships and Clinical Experiences
Kaplan University requirements for externships are located in the Undergraduate Policy Information section.

215

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
DA B170: RADIOLOGY

4.5

DA G151: PATIENT INTERACTION

6.5

DA K151: FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS FOR DENTAL ASSISTING
DA O170: OPERATIVE ASSISTING
DA P170: DENTAL MATERIALS
DA R170: CHAIRSIDE SPECIALTIES
DA V190: SPECIALTY DENTISTRY EXTERNSHIP

6
5
5.5
6
2.5

DA W151: TECHNOLOGY AND TERMINOLOGY FOR DENTAL
ASSISTING

6

DA Y151: DIAGNOSTIC ASSISTING

5

DA Z190: GENERAL DENTISTRY EXTERNSHIP

9

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

216

56

56

Medical Assistant Certificate (Onsite)
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Medical Assistant Certificate program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position in the ambulatory medical field. The Medical Assistant Certificate program is designed to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. This program concentrates on helping you acquire knowledge and develop skills in performing laboratory, clinical, and medical office procedures in a physician's office or ambulatory care clinic.
Upon graduation, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) examination given by the American Association of Medical
Assistants, the Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) examination given by the American Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical
Assistant (NCMA) examination given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant
(CCMA) examination given by the National Healthcareer Association. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Workplace duties may include performing CLIA-waived tests, venipuncture, urinalysis, and electrocardiograms. You may also assist the physician in patient preparation and patient relations.

Clinical Experiences
You will complete clinical instruction in a classroom lab for both MA 260: Clinical Competencies I and MA 270: Clinical Competencies II. You must also complete an unpaid externship (160 hours) in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Medical Assistant Certificate program consists of 57 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate. Program Outcomes
1. Clinical: Demonstrate the core competencies of medical assisting clinical practice.
2. Administrative: Perform clerical and administrative functions required of a medical assistant.
3. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Practice professional, ethical, and legal standards in health care settings.
4. Professionalism: Exhibit professional behavior as defined by the health care industry.

Policies
Progression Requirements
1. Prior to beginning the externship, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved health care provider CPR training course.
Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider, Heartsaver CPR and AED,
Healthcare Provider), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR with AED, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, CPR/AED for the
Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider), and ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for health care providers).
2. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete the following courses on the second attempt:

MA 260: Clinical Competencies I


MA 270: Clinical Competencies II



MA 290: Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation

3. If you are a campus-based medical assisting student re-entering the program, and have not completed one or both of the Clinical
Competencies I and II courses within 6 months prior to the externship, you will need to successfully complete a competency evaluation prior to enrolling in MA 290: Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation.

217

4. If you are entering a campus-based CAAHEP-approved program and have completed MA 260: Clinical Competencies I, MA 270: Clinical
Competencies II, HS 210: Medical Office Management, and/or HS 220: Medical Coding and Insurance or an equivalent course within a non-CAAHEP or ABHES-approved program, these courses will be applied toward the program pending successful completion of a competency evaluation.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Medical Assistant Certificate program is designed to prepare you with clinical and administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical assistant. After completing the onsite program offered at a campus in the states of Iowa, Maine, Maryland, or Nebraska, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) examination given by the American Association of Medical Assistants, the Registered Medical
Assistant (RMA) examination, given by the American Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) examination given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) examination given by the
National Healthcareer Association (NHA).

218

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 220: MEDICAL CODING AND INSURANCE

5

HS 275: PROFESSIONALISM IN HEALTH CARE

2

MA 260: CLINICAL COMPETENCIES I

5

MA 270: CLINICAL COMPETENCIES II

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

MA 290: MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP AND EVALUATION

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

57

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

57

219

Medical Assistant Certificate (Online)
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Medical Assistant Certificate program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position in the ambulatory medical field. The Medical Assistant Certificate program is designed to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. This program concentrates on helping you acquire knowledge and develop skills in performing laboratory, clinical, and medical office procedures in a physician's office or ambulatory care clinic.
Upon graduation from the program, you may be eligible to take the Registered Medical Assistant examination given by the American Medical
Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) examination given by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) examination given by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Refer to the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Workplace duties may include performing CLIA-waived tests, venipuncture, urinalysis, and electrocardiograms. You may also assist the physician in patient preparation and patient relations.

Clinical Experiences
The program blends online coursework with on-ground experiences. If you enroll in the online program, you will need to complete clinical experiences at an approved clinical site for MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III. All students must also complete an externship (160 hours) in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Medical Assistant Certificate program consists of a minimum of 57 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of this program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
If you reside in one of the following states, you may not enroll in the Medical Assistant Certificate: Delaware, North Carolina, Oregon,
Tennessee, or Washington.

Progression Requirements
1. Prior to beginning the first clinical experience, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved health care provider CPR training course. Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider, Heartsaver CPR and AED, Healthcare Provider), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR with AED, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, CPR/
AED for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider; BLS/CPR for Healthcare Public Safety; and BLS for Healthcare Providers), and
ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for health care providers).
2. As an online student, you must:
a. Provide notice of intent to enroll in clinical courses and externships 3 months prior to the beginning of the term in which you wish to enroll. Notification must be submitted to the Health Sciences Clinical Placement Department using the appropriate application form.
b. Complete a clinical orientation workshop and pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, practicum, or externship site.
c. Enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning Portfolio in your second term if you are interested in pursuing credit for experiential learning. You must complete the portfolio development and assessment process by the end of the third term or by the time you have accumulated 30 credits within your program.
3. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete the following courses on the second attempt:

MA 265: Online Clinical Competencies I


220

MA 275: Online Clinical Competencies II



MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III



MA 295: Online Medical Assisting Externship and Evaluation

4. If you are a medical assisting student and drop, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence longer than 6 months after beginning and prior to completing clinical coursework (MA 250: Online Professionalism in Health Care, MA 265: Online Clinical Competencies I, MA 275:
Online Clinical Competencies II, MA 280: Online Clinical Competencies III, and MA 295: Online Medical Assisting Externship and
Evaluation), you will be required to re-take one or more of these courses to ensure currency of skills.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.

Certification Examinations
The Medical Assisting Certificate program is designed to prepare you with clinical and administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical assistant. Upon graduation from the online program, you may be eligible to take the Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) examination given by the American Medical Technologists, the National Certified Medical Assistant (NCMA) exam given by the National Center for Competency
Testing (NCCT), and the Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) exam given by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA).

Washington Students
The state of Washington requires all medical assistants to be certified or registered. Eligibility for certification requires graduation from a postsecondary school or college accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency approved by the U.S. Department of Education, which includes a minimum of 720 clock hours of training in medical assisting skills, including a clinical externship of no less than 160 hours.
In addition, graduates must successfully pass, within 5 years before submitting an initial application for certification, a certification examination issued by the AAMA, AMT, NHA, or NCCT. Students who have completed all requirements except for passage of the examination may obtain interim certification, which will allow them to provide the Medical Assistant—Certified's full scope of practice. This interim certification expires when the graduate obtains the Medical Assistant—Certified credential or after 1 year and cannot be renewed.
Washington students also may obtain a Medical Assistant—Registered credential if they obtain an endorsement from a health care practitioner, clinic, or group practice. Medical Assistant—Registered individuals may perform only the medical tasks listed in their current attestation of endorsement and cannot transfer the registration to another health care practitioner, clinic, or group practice.

Nebraska Medication Aide Registry for Medical Assistants
Medical assisting students completing an externship in the state of Nebraska will be required to complete a Medication Aide application with competency validation by an approved Nebraska licensed provider prior to the externship. In addition, you will be required to provide any associated required documentation to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services that may include certified copies of court documents for criminal convictions.

221

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 140: PHARMACOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 220: MEDICAL CODING AND INSURANCE

5

MA 250: ONLINE PROFESSIONALISM IN HEALTH CARE

1

MA 265: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES I

5

MA 275: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES II

5

MA 280: ONLINE CLINICAL COMPETENCIES III

1

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

MA 295: ONLINE MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP AND
EVALUATION

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

222

57

57

Medical Billing/Coding Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Medical Billing/Coding Certificate program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue an entry-level position as a billing and insurance specialist in either a physician's office or institutional setting, or as a patient referral specialist, coder, or medical receptionist. The curriculum concentrates on helping you acquire the basic skills and knowledge necessary to submit medical claims for reimbursement, process bills, operate computerized billing systems, and gain a working knowledge of various insurance plans.
Emphasis is placed on quality of coding for reimbursement and statistical reporting. You may receive hands-on training through additional hours of practical experience in medical billing, coding, and administrative functions in a classroom lab setting.
Upon graduation, workplace duties may include evaluating medical records in order to appropriately assign ICD-9 and CPT codes related to medical diagnoses and procedures, submitting insurance claims for reimbursement, and evaluating rejected claims for resubmission. You may use computerized billing programs and complete the HCFA claim form. In addition, you may develop a working knowledge of various insurance plans, including their associated regulations and guidelines, in order to efficiently and accurately refer patients to various health care providers.

Practicum Experience
Prior to graduation, you must complete additional hours of practical experience in medical billing, coding, and administrative functions in a classroom or virtual lab setting. If you are an online student, you must complete the practical experience in a virtual lab setting.

Program Length
The Medical Billing/Coding Certificate program consists of 39 quarter credit hours. Upon completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate. Program Outcomes
1. Administration: Perform administrative functions of medical billing and coding.
2. Technical: Apply computer literacy skills in managing electronic medical claims.
3. Foundational Knowledge: Demonstrate knowledge of coding and billing guidelines and requirements in the process of medical claims management. 4. Standards, Laws, Ethics, and Professionalism: Analyze ethical and legal standards in practical applications within the discipline of coding and medical claims processing.
5. Critical Thinking: Apply problem-solving skills to real and simulated health care scenarios.

Policies
Admission Requirements
If you are a resident of Delaware or Wisconsin, you may not enroll in the Medical Billing/Coding Certificate.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the program, you may be eligible to take the Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) certification exam sponsored by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA), the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) certification exam sponsored by the American Health
Information Management Association (AHIMA), and the Insurance and Coding Specialist (NCICS) certification exam sponsored by the National
Center for Competency Testing (NCCT). You may be eligible for additional certifications once you attain professional experience.

223

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 253: MEDICAL CODING I

5

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 215: MEDICAL INSURANCE AND BILLING

3

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

HS 292: BILLING AND CODING PRACTICUM

3

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

224

39

39

Medical Office Administration Certificate
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The objective of the Medical Office Administration Certificate program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue entry-level positions in medical offices. The program concentrates on helping you develop skills to submit medical claims for reimbursement, process bills, and develop a working knowledge of various insurance plans as well as administrative procedures. The certificate program provides a broad education to help you develop advanced technical and communication skills.
Upon graduation, you may be eligible to take the examination given by the American Medical Technologists to become a Certified Medical
Administrative Specialist (CMAS) and the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) examination sponsored by the American Health Information
Management Association (AHIMA). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information. Workplace duties may include appointment management and scheduling, medical records management, insurance processing, insurance coding and billing, and fundamentals of financial management. Competence in the field also requires that a medical office assistant display professionalism, communicate professionally, and provide instruction to patients.

Externship Experience
This program blends online coursework with an on-ground experience. If you enroll in the online program, you will need to complete a minimum
160-hour supervised externship in a physician's office or clinic to complete the course of study. Refer to the General Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Medical Office Administration Certificate program consists of a minimum of 57 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate in medical office administration.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Administration: Exhibit proficiency in clerical and administrative functions required of medical office staff.
2. Standards, Laws, and Ethics: Employ professional, ethical, and legal standards in health care practice.
3. Foundational Knowledge of Allied Health Sciences: Integrate knowledge from behavioral and biological sciences as a basis for allied health practices. 4. Professionalism: Embody professional behaviors as defined by the disciplines of allied health.

Policies
Progression Requirements
1. You will be withdrawn from the program if you are unable to successfully complete MO 290: Medical Office Administration Externship and Evaluation on the second attempt.
2. Prior to beginning the first clinical experience, you must provide documentation of completion of an approved Health Care Provider CPR training course. Approved courses include: American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider; Heartsaver CPR; and AED, Healthcare Provider), American Red Cross (Adult and Child CPR w/AED; CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer; CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and Healthcare Provider; BLS/CPR for Healthcare and Public Safety; and BLS for Healthcare Providers), and
ProCPR (ProFirst Aid blended course for Healthcare Providers).
3. As an online student, you must:
1. Provide notice of intent to enroll in clinical courses and externships 3 months prior to the beginning of the term in which you wish to enroll. Notification must be submitted to the Health Sciences Clinical Placement Department using the appropriate application form.

225

2. Complete a clinical orientation workshop and pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a clinical, practicum, or externship site.
3. Enroll in EL 206: Academic Prior Learning Portfolio in your second term if you are interested in pursuing credit for experiential learning. You must complete the portfolio development and assessment process by the end of the third term or by the time you have accumulated 30 credits within your program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Medical Office Administration Certificate program is designed to prepare you with the administrative skills to provide outstanding patient care. The program is structured to provide appropriate academic preparation if you are interested in pursuing national certification as a medical administrative specialist. After completion of the program, you may be eligible to take the Certified Medical Administrative Specialist examination given by the American Medical Technologists and the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) examination sponsored by the American
Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

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Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
HI 215: REIMBURSEMENT METHODOLOGIES

3

HI 253: MEDICAL CODING I

5

HI 255: MEDICAL CODING II

5

HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 210: MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

HS 240: MEDICAL OFFICE ACCOUNTING

3

MO 250: MEDICAL RECORDS MANAGEMENT

3

MO 270: ADVANCED MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

MO 290: MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION EXTERNSHIP AND
EVALUATION

3

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

57

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

57

227

Phlebotomist Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The objective of the Phlebotomist Certificate program is to prepare you with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits to pursue entrylevel positions in clinics, drug treatment centers, freestanding surgical centers, and hospital areas.
Courses will train you in the highly technical area of intravenous blood withdrawal and capillary punctures. General medical and legal knowledge is provided. Classroom instruction is reinforced in the campus clinical laboratory and further refined through a hospital or laboratory externship.
Upon graduation, you may perform intravenous blood withdrawals and capillary punctures. Clerical duties include using computers for keying in patient data using correct medical terminology, understanding chain-of-custody forms and drug-screening procedures, using aseptic techniques and standard precautions, handling biohazard waste properly, and maintaining patient confidentiality.
Upon successful completion of your program of study, you may be eligible to take phlebotomy technician certification exams sponsored by various organizations including the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), the American Medical Technologists (AMT), and the
National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Externship Experience
Prior to graduation, you must complete a 135-hour externship. The externship portion of this program is uncompensated. Refer to the General
Policies section for criminal background check information and the Progression Requirements section for additional requirements.

Program Length
The Phlebotomist Certificate program consists of a minimum of 35 quarter credits hours. Upon completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate. Program Outcomes
1. Technical: Perform the functions of phlebotomy.
2. Administrative: Utilize administrative tasks in the lab.
3. Communication: Use proper medical terminology to communicate to industry standards within the health care field.
4. Critical Thinking Skills: Apply critical thinking skills to real and simulated health care scenarios.
5. Standards, Laws, Ethics, and Professionalism: Analyze ethical and legal standards in practical applications within the health care profession. Policies
Policy information specific to the Phlebotomy Certificate program is noted below.

Progression Requirements
As a student enrolled in the Phlebotomist Certificate program, you must:
1. Submit proof of having completed the first two Hepatitis B immunizations prior to enrolling in HS 291: Phlebotomy Lab, and must submit proof of having completed the third Hepatitis B immunization prior to enrolling in HS 299: Phlebotomy Externship.
2. Submit proof of CPR certification prior to enrolling in HS 299: Phlebotomy Externship.

Externships and Clinical Experiences
Kaplan University requirements for externships are located in the Undergraduate Policy Information section.

228

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completing of the program, you may be eligible to take phlebotomy technician certification exams sponsored by various organizations including the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) and the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT).

229

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
HS 101: MEDICAL LAW AND BIOETHICS

5

HS 111: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

5

HS 200: DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY

5

HS 291: PHLEBOTOMY LAB

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

HS 299: PHLEBOTOMY EXTERNSHIP

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

230

35

35

School of Nursing
Mission
Mission Statement
The Kaplan University School of Nursing mission is to prepare and develop a diverse population of undergraduate and graduate nursing students to launch, enhance, and change health care careers that contribute to the art and science of nursing. Our faculty are practitioners and scholars who provide a state-of-the-art education within an innovative and accessible learning environment. Our programs build student knowledge and confidence to transform health care. Graduates are prepared to effectively address health care priorities in local, national, and global settings with enriched professional attributes in evidence-based practice and scholarship, critical thinking, leadership, interprofessional communication, and lifelong learning.

General Policies
Upon acceptance to a nursing program, you will receive the School of Nursing Handbook. This handbook outlines policies and procedures specific to the nursing programs, in addition to the below.

Admissions Requirements
In addition to Kaplan University's general requirements, you must complete a criminal background check, as required by applicable federal and/or state regulatory agencies. See the Criminal Background Check Policy below for more information.
Refer to the program-specific policy pages for additional admissions requirements.

Criminal Background Check Policy
If you are a prospective or new student enrolled in an associate's or bachelor's degree program in the School of Nursing, you must submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. No funding will be processed until an approved background check is on file. If your background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.
Additional criminal background check information may be required based on your state and/or clinical setting's requirements. The state of
Iowa requires that criminal background checks include information from the Iowa Department of Human Services relating to child abuse and dependent adult abuse. If you reside in Iowa, you must authorize the University to obtain this information.

Clinical Experiences
In particular phases of study, some courses include a clinical experience that is to be completed without compensation.
Although you are supervised by professionals at your clinical site, you must continue to participate in the online course activities and complete all assignments. You must meet the following eligibility requirements prior to starting the a clinical:
1. You may not have an incomplete grade ("I") for any major course.
2. You must have a 2.0 GPA for any prior practicum or clinical experiences.
During clinical training, you are expected to perform in an ethical, safe, and professional manner and to assist in all matters appropriate to the scope of practice. Failure to do so may result in course failure and dismissal from the program.
All clinical sites are carefully selected based on an evaluation of site personnel, facilities, geographic location, availability, and type of learning experience provided.
The University maintains affiliation agreements with a variety of facilities. Some facilities may have special requirements that must be met.
If you have a particular interest in a facility with which the University is not affiliated, you may bring this to the attention of the Clinical
Coordinator so the site may be evaluated.
If you are absent from clinical training, you must inform both the site and the clinical instructor. You must comply will all attendance expectations while completing a clinical experience.
Clinical sites may require a criminal background check or medical examination.
Refer to the Progression Requirements section of the program-specific policy pages for additional requirements.

231

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure
The School of Nursing's programs are designed to provide you with the background and practical experience that meet state and nationally recognized standards for such degrees; however, individual state licensing requirements vary and are subject to change. Thus, Kaplan University makes no representations or warranties as to whether the degree programs meet the specific licensing requirements of any individual state. The
University suggests you independently research the licensing requirements of any state in which you intend to seek licensure.

232

Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Description and Outcomes
The Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program offers a dynamic curriculum designed to organize and integrate content, skills, and procedures, increase your knowledge and competence, and provide the foundation for progressively higher levels of nursing practice.
A Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree is considered essential for registered nurses seeking broader professional responsibilities and career opportunities. Baccalaureate-level nurses are typically generalists that provide direct and indirect patient care. The program emphasizes professional growth and continuous learning, and features a capstone course and a professional development plan that includes career planning.
Upon successful completion of the required plan of study and all other graduation requirements, you may be academically prepared to apply to take the licensing examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN(R)). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Program Length
The Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program consists of a minimum of 182 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will receive a bachelor of science degree.

Program Availability
Enrollment in the program is limited. Contact an Admissions Advisor for details.

Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Integrate theoretical and empirical knowledge from the arts, sciences, and humanities to support nursing practice.
2. Apply organizational and systems leadership concepts in providing safe, cost-effective, and quality nursing care.
3. Integrate evidence in planning, implementing, and evaluating outcomes of care.
4. Implement safe and appropriate use of informatics and emerging health care technologies in the delivery of nursing care.
5. Analyze the influence of power, politics, policy, finance, and regulatory guidelines on health systems and nursing practice.
6. Employ interprofessional communication to lead collaborative teams in delivering patient centered care.
7. Incorporate health promotion, prevention, and risk-reduction strategies to provide population-focused care.
8. Demonstrate clinical reasoning that reflects ethical and professional nursing values.
9. Deliver nursing care to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations to achieve positive outcomes in a variety of health care settings. General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
This program is only available to residents of the state of Maine who enroll at the Kaplan University, Augusta campus and to students who enroll at the Kaplan University, Omaha campus.

Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you have held prior health care licensure or certification, it may be subject to additional review during the admissions process. Past disciplinary action may be grounds for denial of admission to the program.
If applying for admission, you must:
1. Be at least 18 years old at the program's start date.

233

2. Complete an informational interview with an admissions representative.
3. Submit evidence of high school graduation that reflects a minimum cumulative GPA (CGPA) of 2.75 (out of 4.0), a GED certificate that reflects a minimum percentile ranking of 70 percent, and/or official transcripts that reflect a minimum CGPA of 2.75 (out of 4.0) from any previously completed college/university coursework.
In addition, all unofficial transcripts must be received prior to admission to the program. Official transcripts will not be accepted if the unofficial version has not been previously reviewed by the School of Nursing prior to admission.
4. Achieve a passing score on the standardized admission examination that evaluates basic academic skills. Additional information about the exam is available through the School of Nursing.
5. Complete an admissions interview conducted by the Director of Nursing or designee.
6. Complete enrollment activities, including submission of the Student Expectations Acknowledgment Form. You must also submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. If an approved background check is not on file with the University prior to the first day of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.
7. Pay all applicable application fees.

Progression Requirements
1. You must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each of the required courses for the program and attain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
2. You will be withdrawn from the program if unable to successfully complete a course on the second attempt.
3. Prior to beginning any nursing major course, you must successfully complete the following science courses with a minimum grade of "B":

SC 121: Human Anatomy and Physiology I


SC 131: Human Anatomy and Physiology II



SC 246: Fundamentals of Microbiology

You will have one opportunity to repeat a course. If you fail to achieve a "B" on the second attempt, you will be dismissed from the program. 4. In order to remain enrolled in the program, you must submit proof of a negative result on drug/chemical substance testing by the deadline specified by the campus where you are enrolled. You must provide a valid, verifiable, current prescription and evidence of appropriate medical supervision for medications that may affect your academic or clinical performance during the nursing program. If you test positive and do not have a prescription as described above, you will not be permitted to start the program or re-enroll at a later date.
5. Prior to the start of the sequence of clinical courses, you will be required to submit the following:
a. Proof of a physical exam no more than 1 year old. The exam must be signed by a medical doctor, physician assistant, doctor of osteopathy, or nurse practitioner.
b. Documentation of required health examinations, tests, and immunizations.
c. Current American Heart Association CPR certification (also called BLS) at the health care provider level; online and American Red
Cross will not be accepted. Certification must be valid during your full tenure in the program.
You may be required to pass a second criminal background check prior to beginning certain courses that require clinical experiences.
6. Some facilities may require additional documentation, as necessary, to comply with specific federal and/or state requirements for student nurse candidates. Failure to submit appropriate documentation to participate in clinical experiences by the deadline will result in dismissal from the University.
7. If you are enrolled in the Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the Omaha campus, you are required to complete your clinical experiences at various locations throughout the state of Nebraska and Southeast Iowa. If you are enrolled in the Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the Augusta campus, you are required to complete your clinical experiences at various locations throughout the state of Maine. Faculty will assign you to a clinical site, and you will be supervised by a faculty clinical instructor. You are responsible for arranging and paying for your own transportation, housing, and availability to attend clinical experiences. Clinical locations may change at any time. You are required to complete all clinical activities assigned. Failure to meet clinical attendance requirements will result in failure of the course.

Accelerated LPN-to-BSN (Omaha)
In addition to meeting the above progression requirements, students enrolled in the Accelerated LPN-to-BSN must also meet the following requirements: •


Resume outlining at least 1 year of LPN experience



234

Active, unrestricted LPN license

Letter of recommendation indicating satisfactory LPN job performance from a supervisor who has worked with the LPN for at least 6 months •

Letter from the LPN applicant outlining interest in the LPN-to-BSN curriculum and requesting placement in the Accelerated LPN-to-BSN curriculum provided to the Director of Nursing at least 4 weeks before a scheduled Boot Camp session



Successful completion of the LPN Boot Camp

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing program is designed to help you become academically and clinically qualified to provide outstanding patient care. Upon successful completion of the program of study, you may be academically prepared to apply to take the national licensure examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN(R)).

235

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Maine
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HU 280: BIOETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

SC 435: GENETICS

6

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
46

Nursing Major Requirements
NU 301: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING CARE

4

NU 305: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

5

NU 307: PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT

5

NU 309: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSING

4

NU 310: NURSING RESEARCH

6

NU 311: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I

5

NU 311ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I CLINICAL

5

NU 321: NURSING CARE OF CHILDBEARING FAMILIES

4

NU 321ME: NURSING CARE OF CHILDBEARING FAMILIES
CLINICAL

3

NU 327: NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND
FAMILIES

4

NU 327ME: NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND
FAMILIES CLINICAL

3

NU 330: NURSING CARE OF THE MENTAL HEALTH PATIENT AND
FAMILY

4

NU 330ME: NURSING CARE OF THE MENTAL HEALTH PATIENT
AND FAMILY CLINICAL

236

6

NU 301ME: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING CARE CLINICAL

2

NU 341: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II

5

NU 341ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II CLINICAL

5

NU 411: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III

4

NU 411ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III CLINICAL

3

NU 418: NURSING CARE OF THE GERIATRIC PATIENT

4

NU 418ME: NURSING CARE OF THE GERIATRIC PATIENT
CLINICAL

2

NU 422: LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, ISSUES, AND TRENDS IN
NURSING

5

NU 452: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE

4

NU 452ME: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE CLINICAL

2

NU 496: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRY-LEVEL
PRACTICE

4

NU 496ME: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRYLEVEL PRACTICE CLINICAL

5

TOTAL NURSING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

103

182

237

Curriculum
Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Omaha
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HU 280: BIOETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY

5

SC 435: GENETICS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
46

Nursing Major Requirements
NU 301: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING CARE

4

NU 305: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

5

NU 307: PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT

5

NU 309: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSING

4

NU 310: NURSING RESEARCH

6

NU 311: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I

5

NU 311ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I CLINICAL

5

NU 321: NURSING CARE OF CHILDBEARING FAMILIES

4

NU 321ME: NURSING CARE OF CHILDBEARING FAMILIES
CLINICAL

3

NU 327: NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND
FAMILIES

4

NU 327ME: NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND
FAMILIES CLINICAL

3

NU 330: NURSING CARE OF THE MENTAL HEALTH PATIENT AND
FAMILY

4

NU 330ME: NURSING CARE OF THE MENTAL HEALTH PATIENT
AND FAMILY CLINICAL

2

NU 341: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II

5

NU 341ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II CLINICAL

238

6

NU 301ME: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING CARE CLINICAL

5

NU 411: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III

4

NU 411ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III CLINICAL

3

NU 418: NURSING CARE OF THE GERIATRIC PATIENT

4

NU 418ME: NURSING CARE OF THE GERIATRIC PATIENT
CLINICAL

2

NU 422: LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, ISSUES, AND TRENDS IN
NURSING

5

NU 452: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE

4

NU 452ME: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE CLINICAL

2

NU 496: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRY-LEVEL
PRACTICE

4

NU 496ME: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRYLEVEL PRACTICE CLINICAL

5

TOTAL NURSING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

103

182

239

Curriculum
Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Omaha - Accelerated LPN-to-BSN
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HU 280: BIOETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY

5

SC 435: GENETICS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
46

Nursing Major Requirements
NU 302: TRANSITIONS I FOR LPN-TO-BSN STUDENTS

2

NU 303: TRANSITIONS II FOR LPN-TO-BSN STUDENTS

4

NU 303NE: TRANSITIONS II FOR LPN-TO-BSN CLINICAL

2

NU 305: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

5

NU 307: PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT

5

NU 309: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSING

4

NU 310: NURSING RESEARCH

6

NU 311: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I

5

NU 311ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS I CLINICAL

5

NU 341: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II

5

NU 341ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS II CLINICAL

5

NU 411: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III

4

NU 411ME: NURSING CARE OF ADULTS III CLINICAL

3

NU 422: LEADERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, ISSUES, AND TRENDS IN
NURSING

5

NU 452: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE

4

NU 452ME: COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING CARE CLINICAL

2

NU 496: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRY-LEVEL
PRACTICE

240

4

NU 302NE: TRANSITIONS I FOR LPN-TO-BSN CLINICAL

4

NU 496ME: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN NURSING FOR ENTRYLEVEL PRACTICE CLINICAL
PRIOR LPN EXPERIENCE AND COURSEWORK
TOTAL NURSING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
24
103

Students will be awarded 24 credits for successfully completing the Accelerated
LPN-to-BSN (Omaha) progression requirements.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

182

241

Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN
Description and Outcomes
If you are a registered nurse, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program could provide you with the education to enhance your skills, better meet the complex demands of health care, and pursue employment in numerous nursing and management specialties. Additionally, the program is designed as a foundation to help you pursue graduate nursing studies.
A Bachelor of Science in Nursing is considered essential for registered nurses seeking broader professional responsibilities and career opportunities. The University's degree program emphasizes professional growth and continuous learning. The program features a capstone course and a professional development plan that includes career planning.

Tracks of Study
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program features two tracks of study: the advanced start track and standard track. You will enroll in the track relevant to your previously completed nursing program. If you enroll in the standard track, you will be provided with an individualized plan of study that will allow you to complete required coursework intended to provide a solid foundation for the bachelor's degree curriculum. Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in nursing, consider the Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing option.
Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours including the requisite associate's degree, diploma, or certificate in nursing. In addition, you must also complete all prerequisites for the bachelor's degree courses. Thus, you may need to complete more than the minimum number of credits required for the bachelor's degree. Upon successful completion of the program, you will receive a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Integrate theoretical and empirical knowledge from the arts, sciences, and humanities to support nursing practice.
2. Apply organizational and systems leadership concepts in providing safe, cost-effective, and quality nursing care.
3. Integrate evidence in planning, implementing, and evaluating outcomes of care.
4. Implement safe and appropriate use of informatics and emerging health care technologies in the delivery of nursing care.
5. Analyze the influence of power, politics, policy, finance, and regulatory guidelines on health systems and nursing practice.
6. Employ interprofessional communication to lead collaborative teams in delivering patient centered care.
7. Incorporate health promotion, prevention, and risk-reduction strategies to provide population-focused care.
8. Demonstrate clinical reasoning that reflects ethical and professional nursing values.
9. Deliver nursing care to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations to achieve positive outcomes in a variety of health care settings. General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

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Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
At this time, you may not enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program if you are a resident of Tennessee.
If applying for admission, you must:
1. Provide documentation of a current, unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse in at least one U.S. state or provide evidence of a nursing license comparable to a U.S. registered nurse license from the nation, province, or region where you are employed as a nurse.
Proof of foreign licensure must be submitted at the time of enrollment. The University will verify the authenticity of all submitted foreign nursing licenses. If you are a recent graduate of an Associate of Science in Nursing program and have not yet passed the NCLEX-RN(R) exam, you may apply for admission through the prelicensure contingency enrollment procedures set forth below.
2. Possess an associate's degree, diploma, or certificate in nursing with a minimum of 50 quarter credit hours of eligible credit with a focus in nursing. 3. Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 (out of 4.0) reflected on the transcript for the applicant's nursing degree or apply for admission through the alternative admissions procedures set forth below.

Alternative Admissions Options
If you have a GPA between 2.0 and 2.5 from an accredited institution, you may apply for admission to the program by completing an Alternative
Admissions Dean's Evaluation.
The Dean of the School of Nursing or a designee will review your work history, transcripts, and resume and determine whether admission is appropriate. If you have a cumulative GPA below 2.5 and have not completed an Alternative Admissions Dean's Evaluation, you will not be admitted to the program.

Prelicensure Contingency Enrollment
If you have graduated within the past 3 months from an Associate of Science in Nursing program, but have not yet taken or passed the NCLEX–
RN exam, you may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program by completing a Contingency Enrollment Dean's
Evaluation.
In addition to meeting the stated admissions requirements, the following documentation will be required at the time of application:
1. An unofficial transcript indicating a completed associate's degree in nursing and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher from an accredited institution. By the end of the first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term
Responsibilities section for additional information.
2. A letter of recommendation submitted directly from the Director of Nursing/Dean or equivalent at the previous institution verifying your aptitude to undertake the NCLEX-RN exam and enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program.
The Dean of the School of Nursing or a designee will determine if you may enroll.
If you are accepted under the terms of prelicensure contingency enrollment, you will be considered conditionally admitted and will also be required to:
1. Submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. If your background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.
2. Submit proof of a current, unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse in at least one U.S. state by the end of the second term.
This will indicate that you have successfully passed the NCLEX-RN exam.
If the proof of RN licensure is not submitted by the end of the second term, you will be blocked from classes until such documentation is provided. If, for any reason, you do not furnish proof of RN licensure by the end of the second term, or if the documentation submitted is found to be false, you will be subject to immediate dismissal from the University and the University will take all other appropriate actions. If you furnish valid proof of RN licensure after your dismissal, and all other requirements are met, you may be fully accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN and will only then be able to receive credit for all coursework completed. You must re-enroll through the Office of
Returning Students.

Requirements for Graduates of Foreign Nursing Programs
If you graduated from a foreign nursing program, you must submit an official course-by-course evaluation of your nursing program to a foreign credential evaluation service. The University will accept an unofficial copy of the foreign transcript evaluation submitted at the time of licensure in the U.S. or the equivalent educational verification that was required at the time of licensure in a foreign nation, province, or region. The official foreign credential evaluation must be received by the Prior Learning Assessment Center prior to the end of the first term.

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The evaluation must be completed by an approved agency listed by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services at www.naces.org/ members.htm or by another service approved by the University.
Due to the variation in structure of foreign nursing programs, it is not always possible to identify equivalent nursing courses in U.S. certificate, diploma, or associate's degree programs. If, at the time of enrollment, you meet the following requirements, you may be approved for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program:


You are licensed as a registered nurse in at least one U.S. state or in the U.S. military or provide evidence of a nursing license comparable to a U.S. registered nurse license from a foreign nation, province, or region



Your transcript evaluation reflects a minimum of 50 quarter credit hours of eligible credit with a focus in nursing

The School of Nursing will admit applicants on a case-by-case basis.

Progression Requirements
1. You must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each of the required courses for the program and attain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
2. You will be withdrawn from the program if unable to successfully complete a course on the second attempt.
3. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN program has an articulation plan that allows you to obtain higher education academic credit and reduce repetition of previous coursework. The articulation options are determined using your state of residency and original transcripts from the certificate, diploma, or degree-granting institution. Your transcripts will be evaluated in their entirety for possible transfer of prior academic credits.
4. By the end of the first term, you must submit official transcripts indicating a completed associate's degree, diploma, or certificate in nursing. This same transcript must also show a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher from all previous coursework. Refer to the First-Term
Responsibilities section for additional information.

Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing Option
If you choose to complete the Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing option, you will have the opportunity to complete up to three graduate courses (listed below) in place of open elective requirements.


MN 501: Advanced Nursing Roles



MN 502: Theoretical Foundations of Advanced Practice Nursing



MN 504: Scientific and Analytic Approaches to Advanced Evidence-Based Practice

If you choose this option, you will be subject to the graduate-level grading scale while enrolled in the graduate-level courses. Upon subsequent enrollment in the Master of Science in Nursing, the final grades from these courses will be applied to the Master of Science in Nursing degree plan and will count in the evaluation for satisfactory academic progress.

Criminal Background Check
Before you are fully admitted into the program you must submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. If your background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.

Graduation Requirements
In addition to Kaplan University's general graduation requirements, you must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each of the major and core requirements for the program.

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Degree Plan
Curriculum
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN - Advanced Start Track
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prior Degree Requirements
Prior Degree or Diploma in Nursing

90

TOTAL PRIOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

90

Core Requirements
CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

HU 280: BIOETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 435: GENETICS

6

Choose one of the following:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

34

Major Requirements
NU 300: PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP TRANSITIONS

6

NU 310: NURSING RESEARCH

6

NU 333: PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NURSING
PROFESSIONAL

5

NU 416: NURSING CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT

6

NU 420: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN THE CHANGING
HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT

6

NU 450: PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING—POPULATION-CENTERED
HEALTH CARE IN THE COMMUNITY

6

NU 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN NURSING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
41

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

Students who have not met prerequisite requirements or state-specific general education requirements may need to complete more than the required 180 quarter credit hours to fulfill degree plan requirements. Students who are interested in continuing on to pursue Kaplan University’s Master of Science in Nursing should consider the Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing option where students can take graduate-level courses in place of open electives.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

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Curriculum
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—RN-to-BSN - Standard Track
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prior Degree Requirements
Prior Degree or Diploma in Nursing

50

TOTAL PRIOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

50

Prerequisite Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS

0

Core Requirements
CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

HU 280: BIOETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 435: GENETICS

6

Choose one of the following:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

34

Major Requirements
NU 300: PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP TRANSITIONS

6

NU 310: NURSING RESEARCH

6

NU 333: PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NURSING
PROFESSIONAL

5

NU 416: NURSING CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT

6

NU 420: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN THE CHANGING
HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT

6

NU 450: PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING—POPULATION-CENTERED
HEALTH CARE IN THE COMMUNITY

6

NU 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN NURSING
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
41

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

55

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

55

Students who have not met prerequisite requirements or state-specific general education requirements may need to complete more than the required 180 quarter credit hours to fulfill degree plan requirements. Students who are interested in continuing on to pursue Kaplan University’s Master of Science in Nursing should consider the Accelerated Master of Science in Nursing option where students can take graduate-level courses in place of open electives.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

246

180

Associate of Science in Nursing (Iowa and Nebraska)
Description and Outcomes
The Associate of Science in Nursing program is a prelicensure nursing education program. The program offers a dynamic curriculum designed to organize and integrate content, skills, and procedures, increase your knowledge and competence, and provide the foundation for progressively higher levels of nursing practice.
Upon successful completion of the required plan of study and all other graduation requirements, you may be academically prepared to apply to take the licensing examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN(R)). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information. If you complete the associate’s degree and successfully pass the NCLEX-RN, you will be eligible to enter the Kaplan University Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree-completion program.
The Associate of Science in Nursing program admits students who have no prior health care experience as well as individuals who have completed a practical nursing program.

Clinical Experiences
The program blends online coursework with on-ground, facility-based clinical experiences. Refer to the Progression Requirements section and the
Clinical Experiences section for details.

Program Length
The Associate of Science in Nursing program consists of a minimum of 110 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will receive an associate of science degree.

Program Availability
Enrollment in the program is limited. Contact an Admissions Advisor for details.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Foundational Nursing Skills: Integrate the nursing process into caring for clients at different levels along the health–wellness continuum.
2. Professional Roles: Integrate knowledge from nursing and other disciplines into the delivery of competent, culturally sensitive, and developmentally appropriate care.
3. Leadership: Utilize leadership and management skills within the scope of identified roles for the associate’s degree graduate.
4. Problem Solving: Use evidence-based practice and the nursing process to develop solutions appropriate for delivery of care.
5. Health Care Technology: Demonstrate safe and appropriate performance of nursing skills including using various technologies within the health care delivery system.
6. Values: Integrate ethical decision making and legal considerations into professional practice.
7. Communication: Apply effective communication skills within the professional role.
8. Professional Development Plan: Analyze one’s own professional growth and progress toward the achievement of self-initiated goals.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Policy information specific to the Associate of Science in Nursing program is noted below.

247

Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you have held prior health care licensure or certification, it may be subject to additional review during the admissions process. Past disciplinary action may be grounds for denial of admission to the program.
If you have passed the NCLEX-PN(R) and hold an active PN license, you must possess an active, unencumbered LPN license in the states in which you hold licensure. If you are a graduate of the University's Practical Nursing Diploma program, you must be in good academic standing and have no Code of Conduct violations.
Two weeks prior to the beginning of any course with a clinical component, you may be required to submit current American Heart Association
CPR Certification (also called BLS) at the Healthcare Provider Level; online and the American Red Cross will not be accepted. Certification must be valid during your full tenure in the program.
Prior to enrollment, you must:
1. Be at least 18 years old at the program's start date.
2. Complete an informational interview with an admissions representative.
3. Achieve the minimum required scores on the entrance assessment tests, as required by the School of Nursing.
4. Complete enrollment activities including the Student Expectations Acknowledgment Form.
5. Pay all applicable application fees.
6. Submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. If your criminal background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.

Progression Requirements
1. You must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each of the required courses for the program and attain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
2. You will be withdrawn from the program if unable to successfully complete a course on the second attempt.
3. You must complete your clinical experiences in Polk or the surrounding counties for the Des Moines, Iowa, campus; Linn or the surrounding counties for the Cedar Rapids, Iowa, campus; and Black Hawk or the surrounding counties for the Cedar Falls, Iowa, campus.
If you are enrolled in the program at the Lincoln, Nebraska campus, you must complete your clinical experiences in Lancaster or the surrounding counties. During clinical experiences, you will be supervised by a faculty clinical instructor.
4. After enrollment, you must complete and/or submit the following prior to starting coursework:

Evidence of high school graduation or a GED certificate


Official transcripts from all other colleges, universities, and/or vocational schools attended, if applicable



Admissions interview conducted by the Director of Nursing (DON) or a designee

5. In order to remain enrolled in the program, proof of the following is required:

Negative result on drug/chemical substance testing. You must provide a valid, verifiable, current prescription for medications you are presently taking. If you test positive and do not have a prescription as described above, you will not be permitted to start the program or re-enroll at a later date.

Graduation Requirements
You must meet the following graduation requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements:
1. Achieve a minimum grade of "C" in each of the major and core requirements for the program.
2. Successfully complete all clinical nursing courses with a minimum grade of "C" for the didactic portion of the courses and a grade of
"S" (satisfactory) for the clinical portion of the courses. Failure to complete the clinical portion of a course will result in failure of the entire course. 3. Comply with all applicable policies and requirements related to the clinical educational experiences

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.

248

The Associate of Science in Nursing program is designed to help you become academically and clinically qualified to provide outstanding patient care. Upon successful completion of the program of study, you may be academically prepared to apply to take the national licensure examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN(R)).

249

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY
TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

5
35

Major Requirements
NU 102: NURSING FUNDAMENTALS

7

NU 104: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR NURSING

5

NU 107: PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING

6

NU 111: MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING I

7

NU 122: MATERNAL INFANT NURSING

6

NU 132: MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II

6

NU 222: PEDIATRIC NURSING

6

NU 242: MENTAL HEALTH NURSING

5

NU 262: MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING III

5

NU 280: LEADERSHIP AND TRENDS IN NURSING

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

5

NU 297: CAPSTONE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

7
75

The number of additional electives required will be based on the number of credits needed to meet individual state education requirements for nursing students.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

250

110

Practical Nursing Diploma
Description and Outcomes
The Practical Nursing Diploma program teaches practical nursing skills to help you become a competent, safe, and effective member of the health care team. The educational objective of the program is to provide you with a thorough understanding of nursing science and to help prepare you for success on the national licensure exam, NCLEX-PN(R). Upon passing the NCLEX-PN, you are qualified to receive a state license and pursue employment as an entry-level licensed practical nurse (LPN). Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
The program combines theory and lab activities with clinical practice of nursing theory and care in a variety of settings including acute care hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other community health agencies. You will have the opportunity to apply beginning nursing skills while working as a member of the health team. Learning experiences will progress from simple to complex and require you to use critical thinking skills while applying the nursing process to the care of clients.

Clinical Experience
Prior to graduation, you are required to complete a 480-hour clinical and will be supervised by a faculty clinical instructor. Refer to the Clinical
Experiences section for details.

Program Length
The Practical Nursing Diploma program is completed in five quarters and consists of a minimum of 84 quarter credit hours. You will spend 4 to 8 hours in classroom, laboratory, or clinical attendance per day, totaling 1,240 clock hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a diploma.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you have held prior health care licensure or certification, it may be subject to additional review during the admissions process. Past disciplinary action may be grounds for denial of admission to the program.
If applying for admission, you must:
1. Submit a health assessment/physical examination completed within the 11 months prior to admission, including applicable immunization records and drug screening results.
2. Submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. Please refer to the Additional Requirements for Undergraduate Programs section under Admissions Requirements.
3. Be at least 18 years old at the program's start date.

Progression Requirements
1. You must achieve a minimum grade of "C" (75 percent) in all courses.
2. You will have one opportunity to repeat a failed or withdrawn course; if you are unable to attain the necessary grade of "C" (75 percent) to pass this repeated course, you will be withdrawn from the program.
3. You will be dismissed from the program upon your second failure or withdrawal from any courses in the major requirements listed in the degree plan.

Graduation Requirements
You must meet the following graduation requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements:
1. Achieve a minimum grade of "C" (75 percent) in all courses.

251

2. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The educational objective of the program is to provide you with a thorough understanding of nursing science and to help you prepare for success on the national licensure exam, NCLEX-PN(R). Upon successfully passing the NCLEX-PN, you are qualified to receive a state license and pursue employment as an entry-level licensed practical nurse

252

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CS 122: ACADEMIC STRATEGIES FOR THE PRACTICAL NURSING
PROFESSIONAL

3

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

NR 101: MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

3

NR 102: CONCEPTS OF NURSING

3

NR 103: GERIATRIC NURSING

3

NR 120: CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

6

NR 130: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING

9

NR 140: NORMAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
NR 150: MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING

3
11

NR 160: MENTAL HEALTH NURSING

5

NR 165: ADVANCED MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING I

9

NR 170: MATERNAL INFANT NURSING

5

NR 180: PEDIATRIC NURSING

5

NR 185: ADVANCED MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II

4

NR 190: ROLE TRANSITION

5

NR 200: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

84

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

84

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College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Mission
Mission Statement
The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences prepares undergraduate and graduate students to become professionals, leaders, and change agents in their chosen fields and communities. We offer a variety of academic programs that support career paths that make a difference in response to human societal causes, issues, and needs. Program offerings focus on the knowledge required within these fields as well as ethics, decisionmaking, communication, and critical thinking skills.

General Policies
Please refer to the individual program pages for program-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies. Notice to Students
If you cannot pass a background check, you will likely experience limitations and/or restrictions on employment opportunities.
Before you are fully admitted into one of the following programs, you must submit a request for a criminal background check to the Kaplan
University-approved vendor prior to the first day of your first term. If your criminal background check is not approved by the end of the third week of your first term, your enrollment will be cancelled.


Bachelor of Science in Corrections



Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice



Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management



Bachelor of Science in Fire Science



Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice



Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology



Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science



Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security



Corrections Certificate



Crime Scene Technician Certificate



Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice



Private Security Certificate

Licensing and/or certification requirements may vary from state to state. It is your responsibility to become familiar and comply with the licensing/certification requirements in your respective state.
It is your responsibility to inquire about current employment, certification, licensing, registration, and externship requirements prior to enrolling in one of the programs noted above.

Onsite Students
If you are a continuing campus student admitted prior to April 15, 2009, and enrolled in one of the programs noted above, you will be required to complete a national criminal background check prior to participating in firearms training activities. You will not be permitted to participate in any firearms training or simulation activities if information reveals a felony conviction or other issue that the College of Social and Behavioral
Sciences deems unacceptable.

254

Progression Requirements
Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are enrolled in an eligible bachelor's degree program and wish to continue on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Public
Administration, Master of Science in Environmental Policy, or Master of Science in Legal Studies, you may be eligible to complete one of the below accelerated master's degree options.

Eligible Degree Programs
Eligible degree programs include:


Bachelor of Science in Corrections



Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice



Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management



Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management



Bachelor of Science in Fire Science



Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies



Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies



Bachelor of Science in Political Science



Bachelor of Science in Public Administration and Policy

Accelerated Master's Degree Qualifications
In order to qualify for an accelerated master's degree option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Possess and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
2. Obtain a grade of "B" or above in each of the master's-level courses.
3. Have completed a minimum of 135 quarter credit hours in your bachelor's degree program including any credits received for prior learning.
Please refer to the individual sections below for additional requirements.
Upon successful completion of the bachelor's degree program, you may apply for entry to the relevant Kaplan University master's degree program. If accepted, you will transfer in the graduate courses completed as part of your undergraduate program and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.
You should consult with your Education Advisor to ensure that you are eligible for an accelerated master's degree option and discuss any financial aid implications with your Financial Aid Officer.
You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan University bachelor's degree.

Accelerated Master of Public Administration Option
If you are interested in continuing on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Public Administration, you may take the following graduate-level courses in place of open electives:


PP 500: Public Administration and Management



PP 510: Leadership in the Public Sector



PP 520: Finance and the Administration of Public Funds



PP 530: Human Resource Management in the Public Sector

In addition to the general requirements, you must meet the following criteria to qualify for the accelerated Master of Public Administration option: 1. You must have at least 20 credits of open electives available in your degree plan.
2. It is highly recommended that you complete the following prerequisite courses at the University, if you have not completed equivalent courses at an accredited institution:

SS 236: People, Power, and Politics—An Introduction to American Government


MM 207: Statistics



PP 201: Introduction to Policy Making

255

Accelerated Master of Science in Environmental Policy Option
If you are interested in continuing to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Science in Environmental Policy, you may take the following graduate-level courses in place of open electives:


EM 500: Environmental Foundations and Principles



EM 520: Environmental Law and Policy



EM 530: Environmental Risk Assessment II



PP 510: Leadership in the Public Sector

Accelerated Master of Science in Legal Studies Option
If you are interested in continuing on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Science in Legal Studies, you may take the following graduatelevel courses in place of open electives:



LS 501: Ethics and the Professional



LS 502: Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing



256

LS 500: Legal Methods and Process

LS 503: Jurisprudence and Legal History

Bachelor of Science in Communication
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Communication program is designed to provide you with the skills to become an effective communicator in today's competitive, global workplace. The interdisciplinary approach combines both theory and application, enabling you to gain a critical understanding of social issues, new media, and effective writing and speaking skills. These critical skills, research abilities, and knowledge of social change are intended to prepare you to pursue positions in a broad range of fields including public administration, advertising, public relations, human resources, law, criminal justice, politics, ministry, social services, technical communication, opinion and market research, fundraising, civil service, international business, management, marketing, and publishing.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Communication program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Theory: Understand communication theory and how its basic elements and principles apply to various types of communication environments. 2. Essential Communication Skills: Use contemporary tools, transmissions, and processes to communicate effectively in both oral and written contexts in diverse social interactions and professional settings.
3. Technologies: Understand and use appropriately emerging communication technologies.
4. Research Methods: Acquire, interpret, and present knowledge gained through diverse and appropriate methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions.
5. Relational: Interact ethically in interpersonal and group communication.
6. Global Awareness: Demonstrate multicultural literacy in the global workplace.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Progression Requirements
You must achieve a minimum grade of "C" or better in both CM 107: College Composition I and CM 220: College Composition II.

257

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 111: COMMUNICATION PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

CM 202: MASS MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CM 208: COMMUNICATION RESEARCH SKILLS

5

CM 214: PUBLIC SPEAKING FOR THE PROFESSIONAL

5

CM 240: TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

CM 305: COMMUNICATING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY

6

CM 310: COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT

6

CM 313: TOOLS FOR THE DIGITAL AGE

6

CM 315: GROUP DYNAMICS AND TEAM BUILDING

6

CM 405: COMMUNICATING PERSUASIVELY

6

CM 410: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

6

CM 460: STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

6

CM 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN COMMUNICATION
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 111: COMMUNICATION PROGRAM AND PROFESSION
CM 202: MASS MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

5

CM 208: COMMUNICATION RESEARCH SKILLS

258

5
5

CM 240: TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

259

Bachelor of Science in Corrections
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Corrections program is designed to offer a level of academic study that provides you with a solid foundation in criminal justice and specialized knowledge in the field of corrections. The baccalaureate program focuses on the correctional professional, performing research, and utilizing analytical skills; characteristics that are much sought after by today’s correctional staff and administrators.
The Bachelor of Science in Corrections is a practice-based program designed to enhance your current qualifications and aid you in pursuing an entry-level or supervisory position upon graduation.
If you seek a practice-based program, the Bachelor of Science in Corrections is designed to enhance your qualifications to help you pursue more challenging responsibilities in criminal justice agencies and corporations. Upon graduation, you may seek employment opportunities in various correctional and criminal justice environments such as courts, adult or juvenile corrections facilities, or community-based organizations. It should be noted that some positions may require additional academy training and experience.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning a master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the Progression
Requirements section for details

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Corrections program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Criminological Theory: Demonstrate an understanding of biological, sociological, and psychological theories of crime causation and discipline-specific evaluation of human behavior.
2. Law: Apply principles of law to correctional practice and the civil liabilities of correctional agencies and practitioners.
3. Research Methods: Demonstrate the ability to apply scientific methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions regarding professional practice within correctional settings.
4. Leadership: Analyze the roles of organizational culture, behavioral theory, planning, ethics, and front line or supervisory roles in correctional leadership strategies and practice.
5. Operations: Examine how correctional staff utilizes information and resources to make effective and ethical operational decisions in correctional settings.
6. Technology: Evaluate the impact of emerging technologies on the punishment of crime, as a tool for criminal enterprise, and on the operations of correctional agencies.
7. Treatment: Evaluate community-based correctional alternatives, including treatment programs and standards of care.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

260

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 126: AMERICAN PRISON SYSTEM

5

CJ 130: INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

5

CJ 156: CORRECTIONAL LAW FOR THE CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 255: HISTORY OF CORRECTIONS

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 352: CORRECTIONS IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

6

CJ 420: JUVENILE JUSTICE

6

CJ 433: PROBATION AND PAROLE

6

CJ 435: CORRECTIONAL ALTERNATIVES

6

CJ 455: CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 492: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CORRECTIONS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 126: AMERICAN PRISON SYSTEM

5

CJ 156: CORRECTIONAL LAW FOR THE CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

5

261

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 255: HISTORY OF CORRECTIONS

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

262

180

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to offer a level of academic study that provides you with a solid foundation in criminal justice and a broad liberal arts knowledge base. The baccalaureate program combines the professional skills of various specialized areas of criminal justice with research and analytical skills.
If you seek a practice-based program, the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is designed to enhance your qualifications to help you pursue more challenging responsibilities in criminal justice agencies and corporations. Upon graduation, you may seek employment opportunities in various criminal justice environments such as law enforcement, courts, adult and juvenile corrections, corporate security, public safety, loss prevention, private protective services or investigations, or community-based programs and services. It should be noted that some positions may require additional academy training and experience.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Concentrations
The bachelor's degree program offers you the opportunity to personalize a degree with a concentration in law enforcement, forensic psychology, crime scene investigation, homeland security, or juvenile justice.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning a master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the Progression
Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Criminological Theory: Use biological, sociological, and psychological criminological theories to understand the reasons individuals commit criminal acts.
2. Law: Apply the principles of criminal law and civil liabilities to keep officers and agencies from committing criminal acts and violating civil liabilities.
3. Research Methods: Use scientific methods to make professional and logical decisions.
4. Leadership: Build relationships within the community by understanding organizational culture, community relations, and theories of behavior. 5. Operations: Use available resources to make sound operational decisions for the criminal justice agency.
6. Technology: Apply new technology to improve the operations within a criminal justice agency.
7. Internationalism: Understand and evaluate worldwide criminal justice systems and enterprises.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

263

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

264

6
6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

265

Curriculum
Law Enforcement
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

88

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

266

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. Concentration Requirements - Law Enforcement
CJ 333: FAMILY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

6

CJ 355: HOMELAND SECURITY

6

CJ 370: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION II

6

CJ 411: DRUGS AND ALCOHOL IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SYSTEM

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

267

Curriculum
Forensic Psychology
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

88

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

268

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. Concentration Requirements - Forensic Psychology
CJ 325: PSYCHOLOGY FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

6

CJ 440: CRISIS INTERVENTION

6

PS 440: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

300/400 LEVEL: CRIMINAL JUSTICE ELECTIVE

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

269

Curriculum
Crime Scene Investigation
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

88

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

270

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. Concentration Requirements - Crime Scene Investigation
CJ 328: FORENSIC FINGERPRINT ANALYSIS

6

CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 370: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION II

6

CJ 385: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY AND TRACE EVIDENCE ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

271

Curriculum
Juvenile Justice
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

88

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

272

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. Concentration Requirements - Juvenile Justice
CJ 150: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

5

CJ 333: FAMILY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

6

CJ 420: JUVENILE JUSTICE

6

CJ 445: CASE MANAGEMENT

6

PS 440: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan. Students will take CJ 150: Juvenile Delinquency in place of an open elective. CJ 150 is eligible for waiver for students with advanced start credit.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

273

Curriculum
Homeland Security
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 490: RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
CJ 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following 200-level courses:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

Choose one of the following 300/400-level courses:
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

88

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

274

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

CJ 230: CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

5

Choose one of the following 200-Level Criminal Justice Electives:
CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. Concentration Requirements - Homeland Security
CJ 307: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN TERRORIST ATTACKS AND
DISASTERS

6

CJ 355: HOMELAND SECURITY

6

CJ 407: CRISIS NEGOTIATION

6

FS 320: RECOVERY PRACTICES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major electives requirement of the degree plan. Students who select the homeland security concentration will have the prerequisite of FS 120 waived.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

275

Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration builds on the foundations of early childhood development best practices while preparing you to administer early childhood programs focusing on children from birth through age 8. Foundation coursework concentrates on growth and development, applied theory, health and nutrition, lesson planning, business administration, program leadership and advocacy, current issues and trends, ethics and professionalism, and strategies for building family and community relationships in a diverse society in the early childhood field.
The course curriculum blends theory and practice, and provides a general education foundation in ethics, critical thinking, and communication skills to support leadership roles and responsibilities in diverse environments.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.
This program is intended for students who wish to advance their career by assuming a leadership or administrative role in an early childhood development setting. This program is not intended for individuals who are pursuing a license to teach early childhood education in a public or accredited private elementary school.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Administration program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Apply knowledge through active participation in coursework and review of current practices in child development, learning theory, program administration, leadership competencies, and financial management in early childhood programs.
2. Child, Family, and Community Relationships: Formulate strategies for building family and community relationships in a diverse society.
3. Observation and Assessment: Evaluate developmentally appropriate observation and assessment techniques to administer and inform instructional planning for children and their families.
4. Learning Environments: Evaluate developmentally appropriate principles, tools, and practices to create effective learning environments for young children.
5. Ethics and Professionalism: Demonstrate use of professional standards, ethical values, critical inquiry, and advocacy practices of the early childhood field through the review of case study scenarios.
6. Individuality and Cultural Diversity: Illustrate the importance of individuality and cultural diversity of children and their families to learning and development.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

276

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

CE 101: INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

5

CE 114: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 215: EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM PLANNING

5

CE 220: CHILD SAFETY, NUTRITION, AND HEALTH

5

CE 240: YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

CE 300: OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 370: FUNDING DEVELOPMENT AND FINANCIAL PLANNING IN
EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS

6

CE 371: EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATION

6

CE 401: CURRENT ISSUES AND TRENDS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 402: EARLY CHILDHOOD FAMILY, COMMUNITY, AND
ADVOCACY

6

CM 410: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

6

LI 410: LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

6

CE 490: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
ADMINISTRATION

6

277

Choose one of the following:
CE 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT
CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
103

Online students will take CE 100: Preparing for a Career in Early Childhood
Development.

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS

5

CE 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 114: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 220: CHILD SAFETY, NUTRITION, AND HEALTH

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

44

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

44

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

278

180

Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development program is a nonlicensure program designed to prepare you to work in early childhood settings with children from birth through age 8. Foundation coursework concentrates on growth and development, applied theory, ethics and professionalism, children in the inclusive classroom, health and nutrition, and lesson planning and implementation.
The course curriculum blends theory and practice, and provides a general education foundation in ethics, critical thinking, and communication skills to support roles and responsibilities in diverse learning environments.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. If you are enrolled at a
Maine campus and choose the student teaching option, you may be required to complete up to 192 quarter credit hours, which includes 18 quarter credit hours of student teaching. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of child development and learning theory in early childhood settings.
2. Child, Family, and Community Relationships: Develop, plan, and implement strategies for building family and community relationships.
3. Observation and Assessment: Evaluate developmentally appropriate observation and assessment to inform instructional planning for children and their families.
4. Learning Environments: Evaluate developmentally appropriate principles, tools, and practices to create effective learning environments for young children.
5. Ethics and Professionalism: Demonstrate use of professional standards, ethical values, critical inquiry, and advocacy practices of the early childhood field.
6. Individuality and Cultural Diversity: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of individuality and cultural diversity of children and their families to learning and development.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development program at a campus in the state of Maine, you must pass a background check by the end of the first term. If you do not pass a background check or fail to complete a background check by the end of the first term of enrollment, you will be withdrawn from the program and will not owe any financial obligation to the University except for the application fee, which is nonrefundable. In addition to the background check conducted during the first term, if you choose to be placed at a student teaching site, you will be subject to a second background check prior to that placement.
If you reside in the state of Kansas, you may not enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development.

279

Progression Requirements
In addition to the background check identified in the admissions requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development, if you are enrolled in the program at a campus in the state of Maine and wish to complete the student teaching option, you must complete an additional criminal background check prior to placement at a student teaching site. If you are unable to pass a criminal background check prior to placement at a student teaching site, you will be dismissed from the program.www.epsb.ky.gov/certification/outofstate.asp
In addition, if you choose to complete the student teaching option, you must successfully pass specified professional competency exams prior to being eligible for placement at a student teaching site.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development program at a Maine campus and are interested in seeking state of
Maine early childhood and/or special education teacher certifications, you must successfully complete any required student teaching hours and additional specified electives to meet state certification eligibility requirements. Some certification options require an additional term of full-time student teaching for eligibility.
Contact the Kaplan University, Maine Department Chair if you are interested in pursuing certifications in the state of Maine. For additional information on certification options and requirements, contact the State of Maine Department of Education:
State of Maine Department of Education
23 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333
Tel: 207.624.6603
Email: cert.doe@maine.gov
Website: www.maine.gov/education/cert

Kentucky Students
Please be advised that this program is NOT accredited in Kentucky by the Education Professional Standards Board and is NOT recognized for initial, additional, or renewal of certification or salary enhancement (rank change) for P-12 educators in Kentucky. For more information, please visit the Education Professional Standards Board’s website at www.epsb.ky.gov/certification/outofstate.asp.

280

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Standard
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CE 101: INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

5

CE 114: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 215: EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM PLANNING

5

CE 220: CHILD SAFETY, NUTRITION, AND HEALTH

5

CE 230: CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

5

CE 240: YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CE 300: OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 310: CHILDREN’S LITERACY

6

CE 320: LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN THE YOUNG CHILD

6

CE 330: TEACHING ACROSS CONTENT—MATH, SCIENCE, AND
SOCIOLOGY FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

6

CE 410: TEACHING ART AND MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 420: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

6

CE 430: LEARNING THROUGH PLAY IN THE INCLUSIVE
CLASSROOM

6

CE 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

6

Choose one of the following:
CE 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

281

Choose one of the following:
PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
SS 144: SOCIOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
93

Online students will take CE 100: Preparing for a Career in Early Childhood
Development.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

54

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

54

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

282

180

Curriculum
Maine Student Teaching Option
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CE 101: INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

5

CE 114: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 215: EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM PLANNING

5

CE 220: CHILD SAFETY, NUTRITION, AND HEALTH

5

CE 230: CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

5

CE 240: YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CE 300: OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 310: CHILDREN’S LITERACY

6

CE 320: LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN THE YOUNG CHILD

6

CE 330: TEACHING ACROSS CONTENT—MATH, SCIENCE, AND
SOCIOLOGY FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

6

CE 410: TEACHING ART AND MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

6

CE 420: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

6

CE 430: LEARNING THROUGH PLAY IN THE INCLUSIVE
CLASSROOM

6

CE 497: STUDENT TEACHING PART A

6

CE 498: STUDENT TEACHING PART B

12

Choose one of the following:
CE 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

283

Choose one of the following:
PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
SS 144: SOCIOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
105

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

54

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

54

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

284

192

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management program offers an interdisciplinary opportunity to study environmental issues and policy from a perspective that explores the interrelationship between public and private sectors and society, economics, and the environment.
The program focuses on the environment in conjunction with a set of core courses in science, economics, and policy. You will delve into concepts of economics, ethics and values, environmental politics, business, law, culture, and property rights, in addition to studying the science of the environment and sustainability. You will study how institutions in society, including government, business, and nonprofits, all participate in devising solutions to environmental issues.
This interdisciplinary program draws courses and faculty from disciplines across Kaplan University including business, arts and sciences, health sciences, and legal studies. The program has been designed to immerse you in the real problems and issues concerning the environment. In addition, you are presented with opportunities for critical thinking and problem solving as you apply concepts and methods to solve issues at the local, national, and global levels.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the
Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy and Management program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Availability
This program is subject to minimum enrollments. If minimum enrollments are not met, you will be asked to enroll in a subsequent term.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Research Methods: Apply methods and tools to retrieve, analyze, and utilize primary and secondary sources of information and data.
2. Socially Responsible Leadership: Apply principles of social responsibility to decision-making actions and interactions.
3. Environmental Management: Apply concepts, theories, and principles of environmental management to evaluate and recommend solutions to managing the environment.
4. Environmental Policy and Law: Assess environmental policy and its impact on local, state, and national systems and communities.
5. Global Environmental Issues: Analyze issues of the environment within the context of the global arena.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

285

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

EM 101: INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND
MANAGEMENT

5

EM 205: THE POLITICS OF MANAGING THE ENVIRONMENT

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PP 110: ETHICS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

5

PP 220: SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP

5

SC 225: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE—ECOSYSTEMS, RESOURCES,
AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS

5

EM 305: THE ECONOMICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

6

EM 410: THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

6

EM 430: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS

6

LS 302: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY

6

LS 305: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

6

PA 301: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

6

PP 310: FINANCE AND BUDGETING IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR

6

PP 420: PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS

6

PP 450: PROGRAM EVALUATION

6

EM 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
AND MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

95

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

286

5

EM 205: THE POLITICS OF MANAGING THE ENVIRONMENT

5

PP 110: ETHICS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

5

PP 220: SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

52

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

52

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

287

Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management program is designed for emergency services personnel and addresses the new challenges in technology, human resource management, and fiscal responsibility. The general public and government appointees are demanding higher levels of training and education for those who lead our nation's first response teams during catastrophic disasters, terrorist incidents, and typical emergencies. This bachelor's degree is designed to empower you to pursue leadership roles that include managing all aspects of modern fire, EMS, and emergency preparedness agencies. Additionally, this program could help increase your administrative and management knowledge as well as occupational and life safety awareness.
Kaplan University is recognized by the U.S. Fire Administration as an official Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) institution. Since 1999, FESHE leaders labored to produce, through consensus, a standardized undergraduate curriculum that is national in scope, content, and outcome. Fire-related and EMS management courses were developed for colleges and universities to use as a model when developing curriculum. All the courses share common titles, catalog descriptions, outlines, and content, which provide a national core of knowledge and competencies as suggested by FESHE. This degree program closely follows the FESHE model.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning a master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the Progression
Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Ethics: Evaluate ethical, social, civic, cultural, and political issues as they relate to the management of emergency services, safety, and survival. 2. Global Awareness: Analyze the social, cultural, behavioral, and economic characteristics of global emergency and disaster planning.
3. Knowledge Base: Develop a comprehensive program for operational and strategic emergency management decisions and materials management. 4. Operations: Apply project management strategies that illustrate the design and management of disaster and fire defense planning.
5. Psychology: Appraise issues that deal with the psychological effects of emergency services, safety, and survival.
6. Research Methods: Demonstrate critical thinking to perform research about the management of disaster and fire defense planning using commonly accepted quantitative and qualitative analytical tools to understand and evaluate fire and emergency situations and scenarios.
7. Technology: Evaluate the use of technology to inform and enhance operational and strategic emergency management decisions.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

288

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 105: FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES

5

FS 120: INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

5

FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 205: ETHICS FOR THE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 220: PREPAREDNESS AND PLANNING FOR EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT

5

FS 225: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE

5

CJ 307: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN TERRORIST ATTACKS AND
DISASTERS

6

FS 304: COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION FOR FIRE AND EMS

6

FS 320: RECOVERY PRACTICES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

6

FS 401: FIRE PREVENTION ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

6

FS 402: POLITICAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL FOUNDATIONS OF EMS

6

FS 403: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT

6

FS 414: PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FOR FIRE AND EMS

6

FS 420: MITIGATION AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT

6

FS 425: DISASTER POLICY IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

6

FS 498: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN FIRE SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
100

289

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 205: ETHICS FOR THE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 225: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

47

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

47

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

290

180

Bachelor of Science in Fire Science
Description and Outcomes
Kaplan University is recognized by the U.S. Fire Administration as an official Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) institution. The Bachelor of Science in Fire Science closely follows the FESHE model and is designed to provide you with foundational skills in firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, and firefighting strategy and tactics. In addition, the program explores technical, legal, and social aspects of arson, the application of technology to firefighting, and the psychological effects of fire dynamics. The program serves fire service professionals seeking enhanced skills and a broad spectrum of knowledge in the field of fire science. The curriculum includes analytical approaches to fire protection and investigation, disaster and fire defense planning, hazardous materials management, fire protection structure and system design, and the role of the fire service within the community.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning a master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the Progression
Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Fire Science program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Fire Foundations: Demonstrate an understanding of building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, and firefighting strategy and tactics.
2. Fire Investigation and Analysis: Investigate technical, legal, and social aspects of arson.
3. Psychology: Analyze the issues that deal with the psychological effects of fire dynamics.
4. Research Methods: Apply scientific methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions regarding fire science.
5. Technology: Analyze methods that integrate the use of technology to inform operational and strategic decisions that will enhance firefighting strategy and tactics.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

291

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 246: HUMAN RELATIONS IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY

5

FS 101: FIRE BEHAVIOR AND COMBUSTION

5

FS 102: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR FIRE PROTECTION

5

FS 103: FIRE PROTECTION HYDRAULICS AND WATER SUPPLY

5

FS 104: FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

5

FS 105: FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES

5

FS 201: STRATEGY AND TACTICS

5

FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 204: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH FOR EMERGENCY
SERVICES

5

FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 301: FIRE INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS

6

FS 302: ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF FIREFIGHTER SAFETY AND
SURVIVAL

6

FS 304: COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION FOR FIRE AND EMS

6

FS 401: FIRE PREVENTION ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

6

FS 402: POLITICAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL FOUNDATIONS OF EMS

6

FS 403: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT

6

FS 412: SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT FOR FIRE AND EMS

6

FS 413: RESEARCH ANALYSIS FOR FIRE EMERGENCY SERVICES

292

5

FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

6

FS 414: PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FOR FIRE AND EMS
FS 498: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN FIRE SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
115

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 246: HUMAN RELATIONS IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY

5

FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 102: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR FIRE PROTECTION

5

FS 103: FIRE PROTECTION HYDRAULICS AND WATER SUPPLY

5

FS 104: FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

5

FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 204: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH FOR EMERGENCY
SERVICES

5

FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

32

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

32

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

293

Bachelor of Science in Human Services
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Human Services program draws from multiple disciplines, such as health services, psychology, sociology, law, and criminal justice, to help prepare you to meet the complex challenges of the twenty-first century in the growing field of human services.
The program is designed to help you gain the skills, knowledge, attitudes, and experience to assess, intervene, and evaluate the situations of the most vulnerable in our society in order to provide services that respond to the needs of clients. Blending theory and practice, the curriculum teaches you how to critically evaluate your social world as you explore the public and private policies that drive the day-to-day operations of human service agencies in this country and how you can best intervene on behalf of the clients you will serve. The program is designed to provide a broad understanding and the practical skills to help you discern how to be most helpful to clients and a proactive participant in the agency where you may work, which may include areas such as mental health, social services, education, rehabilitation, group and community work, and workplaces including nursing homes, hospitals, and clinics.
This program adheres to the curriculum standards of the Council of Standards in Human Service Education; however, it is not accredited by this agency. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
The program is designed to prepare you academically to pursue a variety of careers in the field or in related fields and to pursue advanced education. The coursework in this program fulfills the requirements to sit for the exam to become a Human Services—Board Certified
Practitioner (HS-BCPTM). Please note that you must meet post-degree experience requirements in order to earn the HS-BCP credential.
The Center for Credentialing & Education can be contacted at:
3 Terrace Way
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Tel: 336.482.2856
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Concentrations
Three concentrations are available within the Bachelor of Science in Human Services program: human services administration, gerontology, and child and family welfare.
The human services administration concentration is designed to prepare you with the knowledge and skills to work with diverse funding sources, influence policy, supervise staff, and intervene on behalf of those most vulnerable in our society in situations involving other agencies and players in the human services industry.
The gerontology concentration focuses on the physical, mental, and psychosocial development of humans during the aging process. Choose this concentration if you have an interest in working directly with the growing aging population and as an advocate for seniors in our society. The courses are designed to prepare you to work with the change process of aging and address how the aging population impacts social policy and program delivery.
The child and family welfare concentration focuses on the complexities of the issues and forces that bear down on children and families in our society. Upon graduation, you may assess, evaluate, intervene, and re-evaluate social structures, such as adoption, foster care, child protection, and reunification, as you work with children and families.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Human Services program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Skill Base: Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the theoretical bases, best practices, and historical and current trends related to the human services profession.
2. Planning and Evaluation Skills: Apply theory and skills to identify, plan, implement, and evaluate interventions involving client needs and delivery systems in the human services profession.
3. Values and Ethics: Use the professional, ethical, and legal values, standards, and practices of the human services profession.

294

4. Information and Systems Management: Apply the information and skills necessary to manage and deliver human services.
5. Diversity and Global Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of culture, gender, diversity, and global perspectives in the delivery of human services.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Bachelor of Science in Human Services program is a member of the Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE); however, it is not accredited by this agency.
The program is designed to prepare you academically to pursue a variety of careers in the field or in related fields and to pursue advanced education. The coursework in this program fulfills the requirements to sit for the exam to become a Human Services—Board Certified
Practitioner (HS-BCPTM). Please note that you must meet post-degree experience requirements in order to earn the HS-BCP credential.
The Center for Credentialing & Education can be contacted at:
3 Terrace Way
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Tel: 336.482.2856

295

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Human Service Administration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

HN 300: HUMAN SERVICES AND SOCIAL POLICY

6

HN 330: CASE MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 410: HUMAN SERVICES DELIVERY

6

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES
HN 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE FOR HUMAN SERVICES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
24
6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS
HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

296

5
5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Concentration Requirements - Human Service Administration
HN 345: PUBLIC RELATIONS IN NOT-FOR-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS

6

HN 347: PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION

6

HN 400: PROPOSAL DESIGNS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 450: LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

297

Curriculum
Gerontology
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

HN 300: HUMAN SERVICES AND SOCIAL POLICY

6

HN 330: CASE MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 410: HUMAN SERVICES DELIVERY

6

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES
HN 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE FOR HUMAN SERVICES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
24
6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

298

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Concentration Requirements - Gerontology
HN 360: THE AGING POPULATION AND SOCIETY

6

HN 365: PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING

6

HN 420: SOCIAL AND HEALTH CARE ISSUES IN AGING

6

HN 450: LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

299

Curriculum
Child and Family Welfare
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

HN 300: HUMAN SERVICES AND SOCIAL POLICY

6

HN 330: CASE MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 410: HUMAN SERVICES DELIVERY

6

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES
HN 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE FOR HUMAN SERVICES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
24
6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

300

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Concentration Requirements - Child and Family Welfare
HN 370: CHILD WELFARE AND FAMILY

6

HN 377: STUDIES IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

6

HN 430: ADVOCACY FOR FAMILIES AND YOUTH

6

HN 450: LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

301

Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies
Description and Outcomes
The Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies program is designed to provide you with an education that incorporates the study of law (and related disciplines) with the development of both practical and analytical skills. In addition, if you plan on continuing your course of study at the law school level, the program's solid educational foundation could prepare you for the rigors of advanced study of the law or other areas of graduate study. The program focuses on the knowledge, skills, and values required of competent and ethical professionals working in the legal services industry.
Courses provide a well-rounded academic foundation that emphasizes analytical thinking, reading comprehension, and communication skills while helping you develop the practical skills to successfully enter the job market. You will have the opportunity to develop strong interpersonal skills, self-discipline, and ethical principles.
The legal education and training provided in the Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies program may prove useful if you are interested in continuing on to law school or a graduate education program or pursuing many other occupations including: arbitrator, mediator, patent agent, title examiner, legislative assistant, lobbyist, political office holder, corporate executive, journalist, abstractor, claims examiner, compliance and enforcement inspector, occupational and safety health worker, legal psychology expert, and jury consultant.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the
Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Theory and Principles: Define the basic theories, elements, and principles of law.
2. Research: Find relevant primary and secondary legal sources in electronic and print media and apply them to specific fact scenarios using prescribed analysis and argument.
3. Investigation: Apply investigative techniques to support the development of a legal argument.
4. Communications: Produce communications using theoretical and practical concepts from specialized areas of law.
5. Critical Thinking: Evaluate the role of legal theory and practice in the practice of societal institutions.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

302

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
PA 165: INTRODUCTION TO TORTS

5

PA 201: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH

5

PA 205: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

5

PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS

5

100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVE

10

LS 305: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

6

LS 308: LAW AND SOCIETY

6

LS 490: LEGAL PHILOSOPHY

6

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
LS 498: BSLS CAPSTONE (RESEARCH OPTION)

24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND
PA 230: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
88

Online students will take LS 100: Introduction to the Law and Legal Profession and PA 230: Introduction to Legal Technology.

303

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
PA 165: INTRODUCTION TO TORTS
PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS
100/200 LEVEL: LEGAL STUDIES MAJOR ELECTIVES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

5
5
10
0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

304

180

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies
Description and Outcomes
If you have prior learning credit and are interested in creating a program to meet personal and professional interests, consider the Bachelor of
Science in Liberal Studies program. The degree-completion program allows you to receive credit for eligible prior learning, which may include transfer credit from a regionally or nationally accredited institution, military training, or other experiential learning.
During the first term of study, you will develop an Individualized Learning Plan under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The Individualized
Learning Plan contains a career goal statement and outlines the coursework you will complete as part of your degree plan. With the assistance of your faculty advisor, you will choose up to two focus areas that align with your professional and personal goals. You will be required to write a one-paragraph goal statement explaining your rationale for choosing the area(s) of focus and submit it to your faculty advisor for approval.
You will complete the core and major requirements outlined in the degree plan and may choose elective courses that support the educational goals developed in your Individualized Learning Plan.
Upon graduation, you may find career opportunities in a variety of fields based on the individualized design of the program.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Concentration
A concentration in leadership is also available within the Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies and is designed to prepare you with knowledge and skills to lead others in diverse settings.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours, including the standard general education requirements. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Occupational Specialization: Apply program-specific interests and general education knowledge to the development of an approved individualized degree plan designed for a specific career or professional occupation.
2. Interdisciplinary Core: Use the interdisciplinary approach to learning to successfully complete a student-selected, focused sequence of elective coursework.
3. Professional Competencies: Use critical thinking and effective communications in locating, presenting, and analyzing information.
4. Cultural and Diversity Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of individual and cultural differences and effective collaboration with colleagues of diverse backgrounds.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies leadership specialization, you will have the prerequisite for MT 302: Organizational
Behavior waived.

305

Degree Plan
Curriculum
No Concentration
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

CM 310: COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT

6

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 345: CRITICAL THINKING

6

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SS 360: AMERICAN WOMEN

6

100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

15

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

24

LI 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN LIBERAL STUDIES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

306

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

100/200 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

307

Curriculum
Leadership
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

CM 310: COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT

6

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 345: CRITICAL THINKING

6

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SS 360: AMERICAN WOMEN

6

100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

15

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

24

LI 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN LIBERAL STUDIES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
88

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 115: COMMUNICATION—CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

5

100/200 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER
The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

308

0

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Concentration Requirements - Leadership
CM 460: STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

6

LI 410: LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

MT 340: CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND TEAM DYNAMICS

6

TOTAL CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

0

Concentration courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

180

309

Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies
Description and Outcomes
Effective November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments.
The Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies program is designed to prepare you to pursue a career as a paralegal as well as for advancement if you are already working in the field. The program provides you with a broad knowledge base and a strong foundation in law and paralegal skills.
The baccalaureate program is designed to combine the technical skills of various specialized areas of law with research, practical, technological, and analytical skills. In addition to the areas covered in the associate's-level program, the bachelor's degree covers the fields of real estate law, family law, tort law, and advanced legal writing, and includes paralegal electives and general education requirements at the 300/400-level.
Upon graduation, you may pursue occupational advancement or seek employment in legal environments including private law firms, corporations, and government agencies. A paralegal's duties may include providing support during courtroom proceedings, interviewing and investigation, preparing documents, managing technology, and researching legal issues.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the
Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Assist Clients: Analyze data to ethically assist clients throughout the legal process.
2. Perform Legal Research: Locate and analyze relevant primary and secondary legal sources in electronic and print media.
3. Perform Investigative Functions: Use investigative techniques to gather information from a variety of sources.
4. Perform Communications Functions: Communicate with participants throughout the legal process.
5. Implement Legal Procedures: Manage electronic and print information.
6. Assist in Litigation Preparation: Draft and organize information for trial purposes.
7. Prepare Legal Documents for Clients.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

310

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
PA 110: CIVIL LITIGATION

5

PA 201: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH

5

PA 205: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

5

PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS

5

100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVE

10

PA 300: REAL ESTATE LAW

6

PA 310: TORT LAW

6

PA 401: ADVANCED LEGAL WRITING

6

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
PA 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PARALEGAL STUDIES

24
6

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND
PA 230: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
88

Online students will take LS 100: Introduction to the Law and Legal Profession and PA 230: Introduction to Legal Technology. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to PA 165: Introduction to Torts must take the course in place of an open elective to satisfy the prerequisite requirements for PA 310:
Tort Law.

311

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete an accelerated master's degree option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

312

180

Bachelor of Science in Political Science
Description and Outcomes
(Currently Not Accepting Enrollments)
The Bachelor of Science in Political Science program is designed to help you develop an understanding of the interconnected issues and challenges that confront governing bodies and society locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. The study of politics and political science is broad and interdisciplinary; therefore, the program focuses on the historical, global, current, and future approaches to political theories and the application of those theories to the creation of political institutions and policy. In addition, the program emphasizes dimensions of politics, governance, the relationships between law and political institutions, economic and political power, and cultural and political identity.
The program's curriculum bridges to other disciplines including economics, law/legal studies, and social science. This melding of perspectives and the connection of disciplines creates a program rich in analysis of how various facets of political, legal, governmental, and economic structures interact. In addition, the program helps you develop skills and understand methods of applying these facets to the study of leadership in the political arena.
The Bachelor of Science in Political Science program is designed to prepare you to be an active and involved citizen in a democratic political system founded on principles of representative government as well as a multitiered system involving the federal, state, and local levels. This program provides you with the tools to participate and compete in the multifaceted political structure within a rapidly developing culture where global lines, institutions, cultures, and economies are blurred. The Bachelor of Science in Political Science program teaches you to think about politics and helps prepare you to be a critical and informed participant in an increasingly complex world.

Accelerated Master's Degree Options
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in legal studies, consider an accelerated master's degree option. Refer to the
Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Political Science program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. The Structure and Organization of Government: Assess the organization and structure of governmental organizations in the context of legislative and administrative processes.
2. Leadership and Advocacy: Apply techniques to access the political system in order to effectively advocate for social and political change.
3. Societal Relationships and Influence: Analyze relationships between law and political institutions, economic and political power, and culture and political identity.
4. Political Theory and Process: Analyze political, administrative, and policy theories and assess their impact on political processes and policy development. 5. Ethics: Apply ethical principles to decision making, actions, and interactions within the political process.
6. Comparative Global Politics: Evaluate the political process, public decision making, and implementation globally.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

313

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
100/200 LEVEL: COMMUNICATION COURSE

5

100/200 LEVEL: MATHEMATICS COURSE

5

200 LEVEL: COMMUNICATION COURSE

5

300/400 LEVEL: ARTS AND HUMANITIES COURSE

6

300/400 LEVEL: PHYSICAL SCIENCE COURSE

6

300/400 LEVEL: SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSE

6

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

BU 204: MACROECONOMICS

5

LS 102: INTRODUCTION TO LAW

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PO 101: INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE

5

PP 205: INTRODUCTION TO ADMINISTRATIVE LAW

5

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY

5

SS 230: MAKING HISTORY—THE FOUNDING FATHERS

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

LS 305: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

6

PO 300: POLITICAL THEORY

6

PO 400: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

6

300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES
PO 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

24
6
93

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

54

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

54

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

314

180

Bachelor of Science in Psychology
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
A Bachelor of Science in Psychology may prepare you to pursue career opportunities in various fields where you may implement your psychological knowledge, skills, and values. In addition, the program may prepare you for graduate work to pursue more specialized careers. The program's curriculum is designed to provide you with content knowledge of the major concepts, values, theories, psychological studies, research methods, and historical trends in psychology as they apply to human behavior, learning, and development. You will study how psychology relates to your everyday life and the importance of culture and diversity. Courses are designed to help you develop and use psychological skills, critical thinking, and the scientific approach to problem solving to evaluate behavior and mental processes while applying psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.

Emphasis Areas
Four emphasis area options are available within the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program. The child development emphasis area provides exploration of behavioral development from birth to adolescence and is designed to prepare you to pursue a career in early childhood education, human services, and community work. The applied behavior analysis emphasis area provides an examination of the design, analysis, and application of learning theories and behavioral principles, and is designed to prepare you to pursue careers working with children and adults in schools and other organizational settings. The industrial/organizational psychology emphasis area helps prepare you to become skilled in the psychology of behavior and attitudes, and is designed to help you pursue a career working to improve the performance, satisfaction, and well-being of employees by applying psychology-related strategies in various work settings. Finally, the addictions emphasis area provides an investigation of substance abuse in our society, including risk factors, prevention, evaluation, and treatment, and is designed to prepare you to pursue careers in clinical and educational settings working with youth and adults.

Accelerated Master's Degree Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in psychology, consider the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychologyto-Master of Science in Psychology option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, enduring conflicts, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
2. Research Methods: Apply basic methodology in psychology including research design, data analysis, and the interpretation and evaluation of findings.
3. Critical Thinking Skills: Use analytical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach in solving problems related to behavior and mental processes.
4. Application: Apply the appropriate psychological principles, theories, and concepts to personal, social, and organizational issues and problems. 5. Values in Psychology: Demonstrate an understanding of the underlying ethical standards, values, and considerations in theory and practice in the disciplines of psychology.
6. Information and Technological Skills: Use contemporary tools and technologies to communicate psychological principles and concepts effectively in diverse social and professional settings.
7. Global Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of how academic and applied psychology can improve interpersonal relationships across cultural and national boundaries.

315

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Progression Requirements
Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program and wish to continue on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Science in
Psychology, you may be eligible to take the following graduate-level psychology courses in place of open electives:


PS 501: Foundations of Professional Psychology



PS 502: Ethics and Standards of Professional Psychology



PS 504: Advanced Research Methods



PS 506: Life Span Development

In order to qualify for the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Have completed between 100 and 145 quarter credit hours in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, including any credits received for prior learning.
2. Have at least 20 credits of open electives available in your degree plan.
3. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
4. Obtain a grade of "B" or better in each of the above-listed courses.
5. Submit an essay that details career goals and associated reasons for enrolling in the Master of Science in Psychology program.
You should consult with your Education Advisor to ensure that you are eligible for this option and should discuss any financial aid implications with your Financial Aid Officer.
You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan University bachelor's degree.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, you may apply for entry to the University's Master of Science in
Psychology program. If accepted, you will transfer in the above-listed graduate courses and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board(R), Inc. (BACB(R)) has approved the Kaplan University course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst(R) Examination.
To become certified, you will need to obtain the necessary number of hours of field experience under an appropriate supervisor, as required by the BACB, meet additional degree and practicum requirements, and must also pass the comprehensive exam.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board can be contacted at:
8051 Shaffer Parkway
Littleton, CO 80127
Tel: 720.438.4321
The professional practice of psychology is regulated by each state, and the degree requirements in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in
Psychology program do not guarantee or prepare graduates for state licensure.

316

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Addictions
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: EMPHASIS AREA COURSES
PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
24
6
88

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

Emphasis Area Requirements - Addictions
PS 370: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 375: PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION

6

317

PS 450: CASE MANAGEMENT IN CLINICAL SETTINGS

6

PS 452: PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUGS

6

TOTAL EMPHASIS AREA REQUIREMENTS

0

Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

318

180

Curriculum
Applied Behavior Analysis
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 410: SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
300/400 LEVEL: CONCENTRATION COURSES
PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
24
6
88

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

Emphasis Area Requirements - Applied Behavior Analysis
PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN

6

PS 360: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS I

6

319

PS 365: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS II

6

PS 430: PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION

6

TOTAL EMPHASIS AREA REQUIREMENTS

0

Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

320

180

Curriculum
Child Development
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: EMPHASIS AREA COURSES
PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
24
6
88

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

Emphasis Area Requirements - Child Development
PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN

6

PS 345: LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DEVELOPMENT AND
DISORDERS

6

321

PS 350: WORKING WITH CHILDREN IN A DIVERSE WORLD

6

PS 420: SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN CHILDHOOD

6

TOTAL EMPHASIS AREA REQUIREMENTS

0

Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

322

180

Curriculum
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
300/400 LEVEL: EMPHASIS AREA COURSES
PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
24
6
88

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

59

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

59

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

Emphasis Area Requirements - Industrial/Organizational Psychology
PS 390: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL
PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 391: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP

6

323

PS 392: ATTITUDES AND MOTIVATION IN THE WORKPLACE

6

PS 451: SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL EMPHASIS AREA REQUIREMENTS

0

Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

324

180

Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions provides you with content knowledge of the major concepts, values, theories, psychological studies, research methods, and historical trends in psychology as they apply to the many aspects of addiction science, assessment, prevention, intervention, treatment, and case management. Courses are designed to help you understand the nature of addiction and clinical disorders to help in your professional work with clients. Courses focus on using the scientific approach to problem solving to evaluate behavior and mental processes while applying psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in psychology, consider the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychologyto-Master of Science in Psychology option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Discuss the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, enduring conflicts, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. 2. Research Methods: Explore basic methodology in psychology including research design, data analysis, and the interpretation and evaluation of findings.
3. Critical Thinking Skills: Assess problems related to behavior and mental processes using analytical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and/or the scientific approach.
4. Application: Apply the appropriate psychological principles, theories, and concepts to personal, social, and organizational issues and problems. 5. Values in Psychology: Examine the underlying ethical standards, values, and considerations in theory and practice in the disciplines of psychology. 6. Information and Technological Skills: Use contemporary tools and technologies to screen, assess, treat, and evaluate client progress in realworld situations.
7. Global Awareness: Explain how academic and applied psychology can improve interpersonal relationships across cultural boundaries in a variety of treatment settings.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

325

Policies
Progression Requirements
Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions program and wish to continue on to pursue a Kaplan University Master of Science in Psychology, you may be eligible to take the following graduate-level psychology courses in place of open electives:


PS 501: Foundations of Professional Psychology



PS 502: Ethics and Standards of Professional Psychology



PS 504: Advanced Research Methods



PS 506: Life Span Development

In order to qualify for the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Have completed between 100 and 145 quarter credit hours in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, including any credits received for prior learning.
2. Have at least 20 credits of open electives available in your degree plan.
3. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
4. Obtain a grade of "B" or better in each of the above-listed courses.
5. Submit an essay that details career goals and associated reasons for enrolling in the Master of Science in Psychology program.
You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan University bachelor's degree.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, you may apply for entry to the University's Master of Science in
Psychology program. If accepted, you will transfer in the above-listed graduate courses and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The professional practice of psychology is regulated by each state, and the degree requirements in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in
Psychology in Addictions program do not guarantee or prepare graduates for state licensure.

326

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 215: NEUROSCIENCE

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

HW 410: STRESS—CRITICAL ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT AND
PREVENTION

6

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 311: ETHICAL PRACTICE IN A DIVERSE WORLD

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 370: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 375: PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION

6

PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 440: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 450: CASE MANAGEMENT IN CLINICAL SETTINGS

6

327

PS 452: PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
PS 497: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ADDICTION
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
6
121

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 215: NEUROSCIENCE

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

26

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

26

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

328

180

Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) degree provides you with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to prepare for graduate study or to work effectively with individuals in a variety of settings. This program provides an examination of the design, analysis, and application of learning theories and behavioral principles. It is designed to prepare you to pursue careers working with children and adults struggling with behaviors ranging from difficulty with everyday social interactions to various disorders including autism spectrum disorders, and other mental health challenges.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details. .

Accelerated Master's Degree Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in psychology, consider the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychologyto-Master of Science in Psychology option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Discuss foundational principles in the field of applied behavior analysis including historical considerations, fundamental principles, and current trends in the field.
2. Research Methods: Apply basic methodology in psychology including research design, data analysis, and the interpretation and evaluation of findings.
3. Critical Thinking Skills: Use analytical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach in solving problems related to behavior and mental processes.
4. Application: Apply conceptual knowledge of principles of applied behavior analysis to case examples and scenarios that reflect everyday problems within individuals, families, and organizations.
5. Values in Psychology: Examine the underlying ethical standards, values, and considerations in theory and practice in the disciplines of psychology. 6. Information and Technological Skills: Communicate psychological principles and concepts effectively in diverse social and professional settings. 7. Global Awareness: Explain how academic and applied psychology can improve interpersonal relationships across cultural and national boundaries. General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

329

Policies
Progression Requirements
Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis program and wish to continue on to pursue a Kaplan
University Master of Science in Psychology, you may be eligible to take the following graduate-level psychology courses in place of open electives: •

PS 501: Foundations of Professional Psychology



PS 504: Advanced Research Methods



PS 505: Testing, Measurement and Assessment



PS 506: Life Span Development

In order to qualify for the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Have completed between 100 and 145 quarter credit hours in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, including any credits received for prior learning.
2. Have at least 20 credits of open electives available in your degree plan.
3. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
4. Obtain a grade of "B" or better in each of the above-listed courses.
5. Submit an essay that details career goals and associated reasons for enrolling in the Master of Science in Psychology program.
You should consult with your Education Advisor to ensure that you are eligible for this option and should discuss any financial aid implications with your Financial Aid Officer.
You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan University bachelor's degree.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, you may apply for entry to the University's Master of Science in
Psychology program. If accepted, you will transfer in the above-listed graduate courses and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board(R), Inc.(BACB(R)) has approved the Kaplan University course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst(R) Examination.
To become certified, you will need to obtain the necessary number of hours of field experience under an appropriate supervisor, as required by the BACB, meet additional degree and practicum requirements, and must also pass the comprehensive exam.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board can be contacted at:
8051 Shaffer Parkway
Littleton, CO 80127
Tel: 720.438.4321
The professional practice of psychology is regulated by each state, and the degree requirements in Kaplan University's Bachelor of Science in
Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis program do not guarantee or prepare graduates for state licensure.

330

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 215: NEUROSCIENCE

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

CE 340: INTRODUCTION TO AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS IN
YOUNG CHILDREN

6

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN

6

PS 360: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS I

6

PS 365: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS II

6

PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 385: TARGETED TOPICS IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS

6

PS 410: SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT

6

PS 430: PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION

6

331

PS 440: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 498: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR
ANALYSIS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

117

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 215: NEUROSCIENCE

5

PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

30

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

30

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

332

180

Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational
Psychology
Description & Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology program provides foundational preparation for a variety of roles in business, government, and nonprofit organizations utilizing rigor and methods of psychology as applied to issues of critical relevance and to organizational effectiveness: talent management, coaching, assessment, selection, training, organizational development, performance (i.e., improvement, management), and work-life balance.
If you have already completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, you may be eligible for degree requirements to be waived and replaced with advanced start credit. Refer to Advanced Start Credit in Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Accelerated Master's Degree Option
If you are interested in earning both a bachelor's and master's degree in psychology, consider the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychologyto-Master of Science in Psychology option. Refer to the Progression Requirements section for details.

Program Length
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology program consists of a minimum of 180 quarter credit hours.
Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a bachelor of science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Apply the appropriate psychological principles, theories, and concepts to personal, social, and organizational issues and problems. 2. Critical Thinking Skills: Demonstrate critical thinking skills as applied to analytical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach in solving problems related to behavior and mental processes.
3. Application: Differentiate the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, enduring conflicts, empirical findings, and historical trends in
Industrial/Organizational Psychology.
4. Research Methods: Distinguish the correct research methods utilized to apply basic methodology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology including research design, data analysis, and the interpretation and evaluation of findings.
5. Values in Psychology: Integrate underpinning ethical standards and values with considerations in theory and practice to Industrial/
Organizational Psychology.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

333

Policies
Progression Requirements
Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology Option
If you are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Industrial/Organizational Psychology program and wish to continue on to pursue a
Kaplan University Master of Science in Psychology, you may be eligible to take the following graduate-level psychology courses in place of open electives: •

PS 501: Foundations of Professional Psychology



PS 502: Ethics and Standards of Professional Psychology



PS 504: Advanced Research Methods



PS 506: Life Span Development

In order to qualify for the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option, you must meet the following criteria:
1. Have completed between 100 and 145 quarter credit hours in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, including any credits received for prior learning.
2. Have at least 20 credits of open electives available in your degree plan.
3. Possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
4. Obtain a grade of "B" or better in each of the above-listed courses.
5. Submit an essay that details career goals and associated reasons for enrolling in the Master of Science in Psychology program.
You should consult with your Education Advisor to ensure that you are eligible for this option and should discuss any financial aid implications with your Financial Aid Officer. You may be required to take additional courses to fulfill the requisite 180 credits necessary to complete a Kaplan
University bachelor's degree. Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Psychology program, you may apply for entry to the
University's Master of Science in Psychology program. If accepted, you will transfer in the above-listed graduate courses and matriculate into a shortened version of the master's degree program.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.

334

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE

3

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following arts and humanities courses:
HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES

5

HU 245: ETHICS

5

HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE

5

Choose one of the following science courses:
SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A
CHANGING WORLD

5

SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES

5

SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

5

SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

33

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MM 207: STATISTICS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

CM 350: PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGIES

6

CM 460: STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

6

HR 400: EMPLOYMENT AND STAFFING

6

LI 410: LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE

6

MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6

PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I

6

PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

6

PS 390: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL
PSYCHOLOGY

6

PS 391: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP

6

PS 392: ATTITUDES AND MOTIVATION IN THE WORKPLACE

6

335

PS 451: SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS

6

PS 496: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN INDUSTRIAL
ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

117

Major Requirements Eligible for Advanced Start Waiver
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT

5

MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

5

MT 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS

5

PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

5

PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ELIGIBLE FOR ADVANCED
START WAIVER

0

The above degree requirements can be waived for students who are eligible for advanced start credit with a prior degree. See Advanced Start Credit in
Bachelor’s Degrees in the Prior Learning Assessment section for details.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

30

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

30

Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in
Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

336

180

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of military servicemembers and veterans and residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015.
After the term starting December 9, 2015, enrollment in this program is open only to military servicemembers/veterans. An alternative program may be available/recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice program is designed to prepare you with applied knowledge, technical skills, communication abilities, and general knowledge to pursue a wide range of entry-level positions in the field of criminal justice. Upon graduation, you may pursue employment opportunities in various criminal justice environments such as law enforcement, courts, adult and juvenile corrections, corporate security, public safety, loss prevention, private protective services or investigations, or community-based programs and services. Some positions may require additional academy training and experience.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Criminological Theory: Demonstrate an understanding of biological, sociological, and psychological theories of crime causation and discipline-specific evaluations of human behavior.
2. Law: Demonstrate the ability to apply principles of criminal law to criminal justice practice and understand the civil liabilities of criminal justice agencies and practitioners.
3. Program-Specific Competencies: Demonstrate the ability to apply program-specific competencies to entry-level criminal justice practice.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

337

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES

5
15

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY
CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
40

Online students will take CJ 100: Preparing for a Career in Public Safety.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES
TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

35

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

338

35

90

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and
Criminology
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology program provides a foundation in criminological, sociological, and psychological theories. Applied knowledge, technical skills, and communication abilities gained within this program offers you the ability to pursue or advance your career in a wide range of positions in the field of criminal justice, including law enforcement, criminological research, crime analysis, the courts, adult and juvenile justice, and public safety.
If you seek a practice-based program, the Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology is designed to enhance your qualifications to help you pursue more challenging responsibilities in criminal justice agencies and corporations. Upon graduation, you may seek employment opportunities in various criminal justice environments such as law enforcement, courts, adult and juvenile corrections, corporate security, public safety, loss prevention, private protective services or investigations, or community-based programs and services. It should be noted that some positions may require additional academy training and experience.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Criminological Theory: Demonstrate an understanding of biological, sociological, and psychological theories of crime causation and discipline-specific evaluations of human behavior.
2. Research Methods: Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method and social research designs used in criminological research.
3. Policy and Procedure: Examine the interdisciplinary (psychological, sociological, and biological) foundations of criminological theory as applied to criminal justice practice, policy, and procedure.
4. Law: Apply principles of criminal law to criminal justice practice and understand the civil liabilities of criminal justice agencies and practitioners. General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

339

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 110: INTRODUCTION TO CRIME ANALYSIS

5

CJ 140: INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

5

CJ 200: FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILING

5

CJ 233: INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

5

CJ 266: DEVIANCE AND VIOLENCE

5

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY

5

CJ 289: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND
CRIMINOLOGY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

25

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

340

25

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

90

Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development
Description and Outcomes
(Currently Not Accepting Enrollments)
The Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development program is designed to provide you with the introductory knowledge and skills to work with young children (birth through age 8) and families in early childhood settings. Specific emphasis is placed on the young child's growth and development, working with children in the inclusive classroom, health and nutrition needs, and lesson planning and implementation.
The program's curriculum links applied theory to practice, ethics, and professionalism, and provides a foundation in critical thinking and communication skills to support the roles and responsibilities of early childcare professionals in diverse learning environments.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Development program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge Base: Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of child development and learning theory in early childhood settings.
2. Child, Family, and Community Relationships: Demonstrate an understanding of the development and implementation of strategies for building family and community relationships.
3. Observation and Assessment: Identify developmentally appropriate observational and assessment techniques for informing instructional planning for children and their families.
4. Learning Environments: Demonstrate the ability to use developmentally appropriate principles, tools, and practices to create effective learning environments for young children.
5. Ethics and Professionalism: Demonstrate use of professional standards, ethical values, critical inquiry, and advocacy practices of the early childhood field.
6. Individuality and Cultural Diversity: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of individuality and cultural diversity of children and their families to learning and development.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Kentucky Students
Please be advised that this program is NOT accredited in Kentucky by the Education Professional Standards Board and is NOT recognized for initial, additional, or renewal of certification or salary enhancement (rank change) for P-12 educators in Kentucky. For more information, please visit the Education Professional Standards Board’s website at www.epsb.ky.gov/certification/outofstate.asp.

341

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CE 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 101: INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

5

CE 114: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

5

CE 215: EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM PLANNING

5

CE 220: CHILD SAFETY, NUTRITION, AND HEALTH

5

CE 230: CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

5

CE 240: YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CE 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
SS 144: SOCIOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

25

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

342

25

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

90

Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science
Description and Outcomes
Kaplan University is recognized by the U.S. Fire Administration as an official Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) institution. The Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science closely follows the FESHE model and is designed to provide you with foundational skills in firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, and firefighting strategy and tactics. In addition, the program explores technical, legal, and social aspects of arson, the application of technology to firefighting, and the psychological effects of fire dynamics. The program serves fire service professionals seeking enhanced skills and a broad spectrum of knowledge in the field of fire science. The curriculum includes analytical approaches to fire protection and investigation, disaster and fire defense planning, hazardous materials management, and the role of the fire service within the community.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Fire Science program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Foundational Firefighter Skills: Discuss the importance of building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, and fire prevention. 2. Knowledge Base: Describe the difference between fire resistance and flame spread and the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each. 3. Psychology: Discuss the issues that deal with the psychological effects of fire dynamics.
4. Research Methods: Apply scientific methods of inquiry to arrive at reasoned decisions regarding fire science.
5. Technology: Discuss the use of computer technology to inform and enhance firefighting strategy and tactics.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

343

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CJ 246: HUMAN RELATIONS IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY

5

FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 101: FIRE BEHAVIOR AND COMBUSTION

5

FS 102: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR FIRE PROTECTION

5

FS 103: FIRE PROTECTION HYDRAULICS AND WATER SUPPLY

5

FS 104: FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

5

FS 105: FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES

5

FS 201: STRATEGY AND TACTICS

5

FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 204: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH FOR EMERGENCY
SERVICES

5

FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

5

FS 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN FIRE SCIENCE
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
60

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

344

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

90

Associate of Applied Science in Human Services
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Human Services program draws from multiple disciplines, such as health services, psychology, sociology, law, and criminal justice, to help prepare you to meet the complex challenges of the twenty-first century in the growing field of human services.
The program is designed to help you gain the introductory skills, knowledge, and attitudes to assess the situations of the most vulnerable in our society in order to provide services that respond to the needs of clients. Blending theory and practice, the curriculum teaches you how to critically evaluate your social world as you explore the public and private policies that drive the day-to-day operations of human service agencies in this country, and how you can best intervene on behalf of the clients you will serve. The program is designed to provide a solid foundation in human services principles that can be applied in areas such as mental health, social services, education, rehabilitation, and group and community work, and workplaces including nursing homes, hospitals, and clinics.
This program adheres to the curriculum standards of the Council of Standards in Human Service Education; however, it is not accredited by this agency. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Human Services program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Skill Base: Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the theoretical bases, best practices, and historical and current trends related to the human services profession.
2. Planning and Evaluation Skills: Demonstrate an understanding of the application of theory and skills to identify, plan, implement, and evaluate interventions involving client needs and delivery systems in the human services profession.
3. Values and Ethics: Use the professional, ethical, and legal values, standards, and practices of the human services profession.
4. Information and Systems Management: Use information and skills appropriate to the management and support of human services delivery.
5. Diversity and Global Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of culture, gender, diversity, and global perspectives in the delivery of human services.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you reside in the state of Kansas, you may not enroll in the Associate of Applied Science in Human Services.

345

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science in Human Services program is a member of the Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE); however, it is not accredited by this agency.
The program is designed to prepare you academically to pursue a variety of careers in the field or in related fields and to pursue advanced education. The coursework in this program fulfills the requirements to sit for the exam to become a Human Services—Board Certified
Practitioner (HS-BCPTM). Please note that you must meet post-degree experience requirements in order to earn the HS-BCP credential.
The Center for Credentialing & Education can be contacted at:
3 Terrace Way
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Tel: 336.482.2856

346

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 144: HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT

5

HN 200: SURVEY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

5

HN 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE FOR HUMAN SERVICES
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
40

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

35

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

35

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

347

Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services program is designed to offer a broad-based foundation in the knowledge of the law and other related practical study areas, in conjunction with the practical and technical skills and competencies required of various professions in the legal field. Comprehensive study in areas such as legal research and writing, civil litigation, legal ethics, torts, and various legal disciplines help prepare you for diverse career opportunities.
If you are interested in pursuing occupational advancement or seeking employment in legal environments, including private law firms, corporations, and government agencies, consider this program. Duties may include providing support during legal proceedings, investigation, preparing various documents, managing technology, and researching legal issues.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Legal Support and Services program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Theory and Principles: Define the basic elements of specific areas of law
2. Research: Find relevant primary and secondary legal sources to apply to specific fact scenarios.
3. Investigation: Describe the exploratory techniques used in the legal profession.
4. Communications: Draft communications using practical concepts from specific areas of law.
5. Critical Thinking: Assess the legal practices of various societal institutions.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

348

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

Choose one of the following social science courses:
SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM

5

SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

5

SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL
SCIENTIFIC APPROACH

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

25

Major Requirements
LS 185: INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN JURISPRUDENCE

5

LS 204: LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING

5

PA 110: CIVIL LITIGATION

5

PA 165: INTRODUCTION TO TORTS

5

PA 250: FAMILY LAW

5

PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS

5

PA 260: CRIMINAL LAW

5

LS 298: ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN LEGAL SUPPORT
AND SERVICES CAPSTONE

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND
PA 230: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
50

Online students will take LS 100: Introduction to the Law and Legal Profession and PA 230: Introduction to Legal Technology.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

15

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

15

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

349

Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies
Description and Outcomes
As of November 11, 2015, this program will no longer be accepting enrollments or re-entries, with the exception of residents of predetermined states, who may enroll through the term starting December 9, 2015. An alternative program may be available/ recommended. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies program is designed to offer a level of training that provides you with knowledge of the law and paralegal studies, in conjunction with the practical and technical skills and competencies required of the profession. Comprehensive study in areas such as legal research and writing, litigation, contracts, legal ethics, torts, and various legal disciplines help prepare you for diverse career opportunities.
If you are interested in pursuing occupational advancement or seeking employment in legal environments, including private law firms, corporations, and government agencies, consider this program. A paralegal's duties may include providing support during courtroom proceedings, interviewing and investigation, preparing documents, managing technology, and researching legal issues.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Assist Clients: Analyze data to ethically assist clients throughout the legal process.
2. Perform Legal Research: Locate and analyze relevant primary and secondary legal sources in electronic and print media.
3. Perform Investigative Functions: Use investigative techniques to gather information from a variety of sources.
4. Perform Communications Functions: Communicate with participants throughout the legal process.
5. Implement Legal Procedures: Manage electronic and print information.
6. Assist in Litigation Preparation: Draft and organize information for trial purposes.
7. Prepare Legal Documents for Clients.

General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

350

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
PA 106: LEGAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION

5

PA 110: CIVIL LITIGATION

5

PA 201: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH

5

PA 205: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

5

PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS

5

PA 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE—PROJECT

5

Choose one of the following courses:
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

CS 121: PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS

5

Choose one of the following courses:
IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND
PA 230: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

5
5
40

Online students will take LS 100: Introduction to the Law and Legal Profession and PA 230: Introduction to Legal Technology.

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

35

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

35

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

351

Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security
Description and Outcomes
This program is not available for enrollment in all states. Check with an Admissions Advisor.
The Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security is created around a variety of public service disciplines including emergency management, law enforcement, corporate security, loss prevention, private investigations, and security. This program is designed to provide you with the foundational skills, knowledge, and communication abilities needed in today’s fast- paced world of public safety at the private and governmental levels.
If you seek a practice-based program, the Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security is designed to enhance your qualifications to help you pursue more challenging responsibilities in criminal justice agencies and corporations. Upon graduation, you may seek employment opportunities in various criminal justice environments such as law enforcement, courts, adult and juvenile corrections, corporate security, public safety, loss prevention, private protective services or investigations, or community-based programs and services. It should be noted that some positions may require additional academy training and experience.

Program Length
The Associate of Applied Science in Public Safety and Security program consists of a minimum of 90 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded an associate of applied science degree.

Program Outcomes
Discipline-Specific Outcomes
1. Public Safety: Apply principles in homeland security and emergency management to make effective decisions in diverse and dynamic situations. 2. Private Security: Examine the role of private security in the criminal justice system.
3. Corporate Security: Apply security concepts to various types of corporate environments.
4. Investigation: Demonstrate an understanding of how to investigate criminal activities associated with security incidents.
5. Law: Apply principles of corporate law to criminal justice practice, and understand the civil liabilities of criminal justice agencies and practitioners. General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies
In addition to the discipline-specific outcomes, general education literacies and professional competencies are integrated throughout your academic program. You can review the general education literacies and professional competencies associated with your academic program in the undergraduate School of General Education section of this Catalog.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

352

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

Choose one of the following mathematics courses:
MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

15

Major Requirements
CJ 100: PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN PUBLIC SAFETY

5

CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 103: INTRODUCTION TO CORPORATE SECURITY

5

CJ 180: PRIVATE SECURITY

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 216: COMPUTERS, TECHNOLOGY, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

5

FS 120: INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

5

FS 225: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE

5

CJ 297: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN PUBLIC SAFETY AND
SECURITY

5

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

50

Open Elective Requirements
OPEN ELECTIVES

25

TOTAL OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS

25

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

90

353

Applied Behavior Analysis Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
If you are interested in expanding your knowledge of applied behavior analysis in order to meet the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst(R) Examination, consider the Applied Behavior Analysis Postbaccalaureate Certificate program. Please note: you will have to meet additional requirements to qualify including degree, field experience, and practicum requirements.
Please refer to the website for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board(R), Inc. (www.bacb.com/) for full eligibility requirements as well as the
Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Applied Behavior Analysis Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 30 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, enduring conflicts, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. 2. Apply the appropriate psychological principles, theories, and concepts when approaching personal, social, and organizational issues and problems. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the underlying ethical standards, values, and considerations in theory and practice in the disciplines of psychology. Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information. Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Applied Behavior Analysis Postbaccalaureate Certificate program, you will have all course-level prerequisites waived.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board(R), Inc. (BACB(R)) has approved the Kaplan University course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst(R) Examination.
To become certified, you will need to obtain the necessary number of hours of field experience under an appropriate supervisor, as required by the BACB, meet additional degree and practicum requirements, and must also pass the comprehensive exam.
The Behavior Analyst Certification Board can be contacted at:

354

Behavior Analyst Certification Board
8051 Shaffer Parkway
Littleton, CO 80127
Tel: 720.438.4321
The professional practice of psychology is regulated by each state, and the degree requirements in Kaplan University's Applied Behavior Analysis
Postbaccalaureate Certificate program do not guarantee or prepare graduates for state licensure.

355

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Core Requirements
PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN

6

PS 360: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS I

6

PS 365: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS II

6

PS 410: SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT

6

PS 430: PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION

6

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

356

30

30

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) Postbaccalaureate
Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is designed for practicing educators who work with children from birth to age 8 and are interested in developing additional competencies for working with young children with ASDs. The certificate program addresses proactive strategies for working with young children with autism, families, and other professionals. Curriculum in the Autism Spectrum
Disorders Postbaccalaureate Certificate program is based on current research in the field of autism and coursework focuses on applied theory, ethics, and professionalism in both the general education and special education settings. Those who could benefit from the Autism Spectrum
Disorders Postbaccalaureate Certificate program include special educators, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, tutors, early intervention specialists, parent educators, social service professionals, early childhood teachers and development professionals, and inclusion teachers.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Autism Spectrum Disorders Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 24 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Explain the common characteristics associated with autism spectrum disorders in young children.
2. Design materials for effectively communicating with professionals, parents, and caregivers of young children with autism spectrum disorders. 3. Identify specific strategies to modify a classroom environment and structure to meet the needs of young children with autism spectrum disorders. Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
Prior to enrollment, you must submit an unofficial transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. By the end of first term, you must provide the University with an official copy of the transcript. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information. Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Autism Spectrum Disorders Postbaccalaureate Certificate program, you will have all course-level prerequisites waived.

357

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CE 340: INTRODUCTION TO AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS IN
YOUNG CHILDREN

6

CE 350: LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT FOR
YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

6

CE 440: TEACHING YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

6

CE 450: BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION AND STRATEGIES FOR
WORKING WITH YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

358

24

24

Corrections Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The Corrections Certificate program is designed to prepare you to pursue entry-level and supervisory positions in today's complex corrections environment. The field of corrections provides a variety of job opportunities, and correctional officers perform a variety of law enforcement roles in supervising and maintaining security in correctional facilities. Corrections professionals also interact with probation and paroleofficials.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Corrections Certificate program consists of a minimum of 36 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Composition: Demonstrate college-level writing, research, documentation, and critical thinking skills.
2. Staff Roles: Differentiate the roles and responsibilities of various employee classifications in correctional institutions and settings.
3. Client Relations: Develop appropriate professional responses to client behaviors given differences in personal, group, and cultural meanings among clients.
4. Client Growth and Development: Define the relationship between biopsychosocial development, current client problems, and appropriate custodial settings or community-based corrections alternatives.
5. Law: Select appropriate policies and practices to meet legal principles and standards applicable to client care and custody and the management of corrections programs and institutions.
6. Client Custody and Care: Define the purposes, objectives, and standards of care associated with various types of corrections programs and institutions. 7. Ethics: Select accepted ethical practices in corrections settings.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you do not possess an associate's or bachelor's degree within the criminal justice field from an accredited institution at the time of admission, you may be admitted to the program after providing proof that you have been employed in law enforcement, the military, or an associated area of criminal justice within the last 18 months prior to enrollment. If you do not possess a prior degree, admission is at the discretion of the Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences based on a review of work experience and other relevant criteria.
By the last day of the first term, you must supply the official transcripts required for your enrollment. Failure to comply with this deadline will result in withdrawal from your program and blocked reentry until an official transcript is provided or you change your program of study to one that does not require proof of graduation.

359

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

CJ 130: INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

5

CJ 140: INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

5

CJ 150: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

5

CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

Choose one of the following courses:
CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS
CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6
6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

360

36

36

Crime Scene Technician Certificate
Description and Outcomes
The Crime Scene Technician Certificate program is designed to provide you with a foundational understanding of the analytical procedures used by crime scene technicians, as well as the documentation, collection, and preservation processes employed to handle evidence. Program coursework will cover evidentiary procedures in a criminal investigation, such as locating, collecting, and analyzing crime scene evidence, handling and processing physical evidence, identifying the boundaries of a crime scene, managing a crime scene, and searching the crime scene for specific types of evidence that can be used in a criminal prosecution.

Program Length
The Crime Scene Technician Certificate program consists of a minimum of 41 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Composition: Demonstrate college-level writing, research, documentation, and critical thinking skills.
2. Describe analytical procedures used by forensic scientists in the application of science to law.
3. Initiate procedures used in the documentation, collection, and preservation of physical evidence.
4. Ethically apply appropriate investigative methods used in forensic science.
5. Apply investigative theory and methodology with scientific theory and methodology in the resolution of criminal cases.
6. Process a crime scene.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you do not possess an associate's or bachelor's degree within the criminal justice field from an accredited institution at the time of admission, you may be admitted to the program after providing proof that you have been employed in law enforcement, the military, or an associated area of criminal justice within the last 18 months prior to enrollment. If you do not possess a prior degree, admission is at the discretion of the Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences based on a review of work experience and other relevant criteria.
By the last day of the first term, you must supply the official transcripts required for your enrollment. Failure to comply with this deadline will result in withdrawal from your program and blocked reentry until an official transcript is provided or you change your program of study to one that does not require proof of graduation.

361

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisite Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA

5

100/ 200 LEVEL: COMPOSITION COURSE

5

200 LEVEL OR ABOVE: PHYSICAL/BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE COURSE

5

TOTAL PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS

0

Major Requirements
CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 328: FORENSIC FINGERPRINT ANALYSIS

6

CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 355: HOMELAND SECURITY

6

CJ 370: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION II

6

CJ 385: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY AND TRACE EVIDENCE ANALYSIS

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

362

41

41

Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services
Description and Outcomes
Contact your admissions representative for program start date.
The Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services is designed for individuals who want to secure a position or potential promotion in the field of human services. The curriculum will introduce you to child and family services and provide basic skills and general knowledge.
Consider this program if you have a goal of making a difference in the lives of others.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services program consists of a minimum of 43 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Examine developmental milestones of children and adolescents.
2. Recognize appropriate skills required of a human service professional.
3. Assess client needs to determine appropriate interventions and/or services.

Policies
Admission Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
At this time, if you reside in one of the following states you may not enroll in the Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services:
Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, Tennessee, or Wisconsin.

Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Human Services Certificate in Child and Family Services, you will have all course-level prerequisites waived.

363

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY

5

HN 330: CASE MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 370: CHILD WELFARE AND FAMILY

6

HN 377: STUDIES IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

364

43

43

Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services
Description and Outcomes
Contact your admissions representative for program start date.
The Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services is designed for individuals who wish to enter the field of gerontology with a basic foundation centered on working with the older adult population. Earning this certificate can help you secure your first position or assist with a potential promotion in the field. The curriculum will introduce and enhance basic skills as well as focus on some of the specific knowledge required of a human services professional who has a goal of working in elder care services.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services program consists of a minimum of 43 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Examine the impact aging has on society.
2. Evaluate psychological theories to aid in developing ethical interventions.
3. Assess client needs to determine appropriate interventions and/or services

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
At this time, if you reside in one of the following states you may not enroll in the Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services: Alabama,
Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, Tennessee, or Wisconsin.

Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Human Services Certificate in Elder Care Services, you will have all course-level prerequisites waived.

365

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

HN 115: HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND PROFESSION

5

HN 205: APPLIED SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES

5

HN 220: PREVENTION AND CRISIS INTERVENTION

5

SS 144: SOCIOLOGY

5

HN 330: CASE MANAGEMENT IN HUMAN SERVICES

6

HN 360: THE AGING POPULATION AND SOCIETY

6

HN 365: PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING

43

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

366

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

43

Legal Secretary Certificate
Description and Outcomes
Legal secretary is a field of law that offers employment opportunities for highly trained and qualified graduates in a wide range of businesses and industries. The Legal Secretary Certificate program is designed to provide you with an introduction to legal secretarial skills and enhance your abilities on the job. Upon graduation, you may pursue employment as a legal secretary or a legal administrative assistant in a law firm, the judicial system, or the legal departments of organizations in the profit and nonprofit sectors. Coursework focuses on the role of the paralegal in the civil litigation process and helps you develop the skills necessary for effective legal writing, document processing, and use of software applications. Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to certain Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Legal Secretary Certificate program consists of a minimum of 31 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Communication: Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in the legal environment.
2. Ethical Decision Making: Demonstrate the ability to apply ethical decision making in the practice of paralegal.
3. Critical Thinking: Demonstrate the ability to apply critical thinking to resolve paralegal practice problems.
4. Theory and Practice: Demonstrate the ability to synthesize and analyze theoretical and practical concepts from a variety of areas of legal specializations. 5. Basic Skills: Demonstrate the ability to apply and employ basic office secretarial skills to produce legal forms and documents.
6. Legal Communication: Demonstrate the ability to produce written legal correspondence and documentation.

Policies
Please refer to school-specific policies and the Policy Information section for general Kaplan University policies.

367

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I

5

CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

PA 106: LEGAL TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION

5

PA 230: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY

5

PA 305: LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT

6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

368

31

31

Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice
Description and Outcomes
If you are currently a professional in the criminal justice field, the Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice could help increase your knowledge of supervision and management. The certificate program offers courses designed to introduce you to the principles of human resource management and supervision in the field. You will study supervisory practices in criminal justice organizations, management theory and how to manage in a criminal justice organization, organizational behavior, employment law, and human resource development.

Program Length
The Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice program consists of a minimum of 36 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Supervision: Analyze the role of supervisors and managers in criminal justice.
2. Human Resource Management: Apply theoretical knowledge to human resource challenges in criminal justice organizations.
3. Applied Ethics: Problem solve ethically as a supervisor or manager in criminal justice environments.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you do not possess an associate's or bachelor’s degree within the criminal justice field from an accredited institution at the time of admission, you may be admitted to the program after providing proof that you have been employed in law enforcement, the military, or an associated area of criminal justice within the last 18 months prior to enrollment. If you do not possess a prior degree, admissions is at the discretion of the Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences based on a review of work experience and other relevant criteria.
By the last day of the first term, you must supply the official transcripts required for your enrollment. Failure to comply with this deadline will result in withdrawal from your program and blocked reentry until an official transcript is provided or you change your program of study to one that does not require proof of graduation.

Progression Requirements
If you enroll in the Management and Supervision Certificate in Criminal Justice, the course-level prerequisites for HR 420: Employment Law and
MT 302: Organizational Behavior will be waived.

369

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisite Requirements
CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

5

CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 102: CRIMINOLOGY I

5

TOTAL PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS

0

Major Requirements
CJ 307: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN TERRORIST ATTACKS AND
DISASTERS

6

CJ 340: APPLIED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS

6

CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 355: HOMELAND SECURITY

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

Choose one of the following courses:
HR 420: EMPLOYMENT LAW
MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

6
6

TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

370

36

36

Pathway to Paralegal Postbaccalaureate Certificate
Description and Outcomes
If you already possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and want to enter the paralegal profession, consider the Pathway to
Paralegal Postbaccalaureate Certificate program. This certificate program is designed to increase your knowledge of the paralegal profession and provide you with the foundational coursework to prepare to become a paralegal. Courses teach you how to communicate effectively in a legal environment, conduct legal research, and evaluate legal sources. In addition, you will apply learned concepts to relevant legal arguments and examine ethics in legal environments

Program Length
The Pathway to Paralegal Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 36 or 37 quarter credit hours, depending on your choice of elective. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Communications: Communicate effectively in legal environments.
2. Ethics: Apply ethical decision making to paralegal practice.
3. Critical Thinking: Apply critical thinking to paralegal practice situations.
4. Practice: Analyze theoretical and practical concepts in areas of legal specialization.
5. Legal Research: Conduct legal research.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
By the end of the first term, you must furnish an official transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Refer to the First-Term Responsibilities section for additional information.

371

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
LS 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW AND LEGAL PROFESSION

5

PA 110: CIVIL LITIGATION

5

PA 201: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH

5

PA 205: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

5

PA 253: LEGAL ETHICS

5

PA 305: LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT

6

Choose one of the following:
PA 221: WILLS, TRUSTS, AND ESTATE PLANNING

5

PA 250: FAMILY LAW

5

PA 260: CRIMINAL LAW

5

PA 261: BANKRUPTCY AND DEBTOR-CREDITOR LAW

5

PA 300: REAL ESTATE LAW
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
36

The Pathway to Paralegal Postbaccalaureate Certificate program consists of a minimum of 36 or 37 quarter credit hours, depending on the student's choice of elective. Total program costs may vary.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

372

36

Private Security Certificate
Description and Outcomes
If you are currently a professional in the criminal justice field, the Private Security Certificate program could help increase your knowledge of private security. The program offers 10 courses designed to introduce you to the field of private and corporate security, examine the range of security responsibilities, and teach you how to provide asset protection to a myriad of clients.
The Private Security Certificate program is not only designed to help you pursue employment in private or corporate security, but could also prepare you for professional membership in the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS) and the Certified Protection Professional (CPP) certification exam. Refer to the Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams section for important program disclosure information.
Qualified credits earned in fulfillment of this certificate program may be transferable to Kaplan University degree programs.

Program Length
The Private Security Certificate program consists of a minimum of 53 quarter credit hours. Upon successful completion of the program, you will be awarded a certificate.

Program Outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of private and corporate security in the criminal justice system.
2. Demonstrate the ability to apply security concepts to various types of private and business environments.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to investigate major crimes associated with security incidents.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of white-collar crime and other examples of fraud and why it is an important field of study in private security. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of what is needed to constitute a reliable security culture in the private or corporate sector.

Policies
Admissions Requirements
You must meet the below admissions requirements in addition to Kaplan University's general requirements.
If you do not possess an associate's or bachelor's degree within the criminal justice field from an accredited institution at the time of admission, you may be admitted to the program after providing proof that you have been employed in law enforcement, the military, or an associated area of criminal justice within the last 18 months prior to enrollment. If you do not possess a prior degree, admission is at the discretion of the Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences based on a review of work experience and other relevant criteria.
By the last day of the first term, you must supply the official transcripts required for your enrollment. Failure to comply with this deadline will result in withdrawal from your program and blocked reentry until an official transcript is provided or you change your program of study to one that does not require proof of graduation.

Certification, State Board, and National Board Exams
You are responsible for understanding the requirements of certification, state board, or national board licensing exams. Such requirements may change during the course of your program. You are not automatically certified in any way upon program completion. Although certain programs are designed to prepare you to take various certification and licensing exams, Kaplan University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to take these exams or become certified. Your eligibility may depend on your work experience, completion of education and/or degree requirements, not having a criminal record, meeting other licensure or certification requirements, or the program or the University itself having appropriate accreditation or licensure.
Upon completion of the certificate program, you may be eligible to take the Certified Protection Professional (CPP) certification exam.

373

Degree Plan
Curriculum
Courses

Credits

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Major Requirements
CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

CJ 130: INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

5

CJ 140: INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

5

CJ 210: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

5

CJ 211: POLICE OPERATIONS

5

CJ 212: CRIME PREVENTION

5

CJ 227: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

5

CJ 345: SUPERVISORY PRACTICES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

6

CJ 444: MANAGING CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS

6

PA 310: TORT LAW
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

6
53

Students are exempt from the prerequisite requirement for PA 310: Tort Law.

TOTAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

374

53

Course Descriptions
Business and Information Technology
Associates Business AB
AB 102: PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING
This course provides an overview of the retail industry and explores significant developments in the retailing field such as consolidation, multichannel offerings, centralization, and globalization. Students will examine the key retail decision variables (location, merchandise management, pricing, communications, store design, customer service, and store management), and explore the principles and practices of successful retail management through contemporary examples. Students will also observe a variety of management theories applied in a retail context. Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 107

AB 104: PERSONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines and applies financial decision-making techniques to everyday life. You will be exposed to the importance of good financial planning. It will emphasize the importance of setting goals, creating financial statements, preparing budgets, and planning for college, retirement, and your estate planning. The course will also introduce you to careers that are available within the financial services industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS
This course emphasizes the use of accounting by managers in a business environment. Topics covered include accounting concepts, internal control, current assets, noncurrent assets, liabilities, and equity. The course is specifically designed for nonaccounting majors, and emphasis is placed on accounting areas affecting business owners and managers.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 114: ACCOUNTING I
This course reviews the complete accounting cycle and the creation and management of accounting information for business entities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the fundamental principles and skills of the accounting profession, including recording of transactions, financial presentation of accounting data, and the uses of accounting information.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 116: ACCOUNTING II
This course continues the study of accounting principles by further exploring the assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity sections of a corporation's balance sheet. This course continues to lead you to accounting mastery using an integrated learning system. This course provides further understanding of what accounting is all about and accounting's evolving role in business.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 114

AB 117: GLOBAL HOSPITALITY
In this course, aspiring managers learn about the many global opportunities available in the hospitality industry. Highlights include examination of hospitality and tourism industry careers. Students gain a better understanding of the organization and structures of hotels and restaurants from a management perspective, including franchising and management contracts, business ethics, human resources, and marketing. Through analysis, students appreciate both the management and customer service viewpoints concerned with global hospitality venues.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

375

AB 122: PAYROLL ACCOUNTING
This course introduces federal laws affecting personnel and payroll records and covers in detail how to process a payroll. Topics covered include the calculation and recording of gross pay and overtime, federal income taxes, social security taxes, and federal and state unemployment taxes.
Required federal tax and information returns and deposit rules are also covered.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 113 or AB 114

AB 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course provides an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to realworld management problems and scenarios. Implications for managing change within the context of a global economy and other dynamic environmental forces are also examined.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 140M1: SOLVING MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS
Describe solutions to management problems.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 140M2: MANAGEMENT SKILLS
Explain the four functions of management.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 140M3: CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Discuss the steps to manage change.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 140M4: GLOBAL MANAGEMENT SKILLS
Identify the implications of competitiveness and collaboration in a global economy.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 140M5: ETHICS IN MANAGEMENT
Discuss the purpose of corporate social responsibility and ethics.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 202: BUILDING CUSTOMER SALES AND LOYALTY
This course studies the use of the following promotional tools and their applications: advertising, sales promotions, events, and loyalty and frequency shopper programs. It looks at the application of these tools to increase customer market share. This course examines the effect that consumer behavior and customer management have on brand image and loyalty.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 107

376

AB 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
In this course, students will examine the processes involved in human resources from a managerial perspective. Students will examine the functions of human resource management including job analysis, staffing, performance appraisal, training and development, compensation, labor relations, and legal requirements.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 204: MACROECONOMICS
Macroeconomics involves the theory, principles, and practices of economics that affect the national economy as a whole. Topics covered in this course include national income determination, economic growth, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, unemployment, inflation, the Federal
Reserve system, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and global economies.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 224

AB 206: HOTEL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
In this course, students learn how management techniques can increase front office efficiency and customer sales. Topics include yield management techniques, the latest computer technology, and team-building skills. Students learn how front office activities and functions affect other departments, as well as how to manage the front office to ensure that the property's goals are met.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 207: STARTING A BUSINESS
This course will introduce students to the world of entrepreneurship and their role in small business. There will be an emphasis on building a business which will include the elements of entrepreneurship, management, marketing, and finance. The Internet will be used as a resource and many real-life cases will be studied.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
In this course, students will enhance problem-solving skills and develop a practical understanding of small business management principles.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 140

AB 213: FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of food and beverage operations from a management perspective. Key topics include restaurant operations, production planning, food safety, and industry best practices. Food service managers must become creative in their efforts to best serve their guests, as competition increases, technology improves, and changes become fast paced. This course is designed to help future industry managers become knowledgeable about restaurant management, regulatory compliance, food production, and quality service. Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 217: FINANCE
This course covers basic financial concepts, principles, and techniques used in making corporate financial planning decisions. It provides students with the tools necessary for analyzing the time value of money, financial analysis and planning, the capital budgeting process and decisions, and long-term financing, and introduces international capital markets.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 113 or AB 114, and MM 255

377

AB 217M1: OVERVIEW—FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Explain how financial managers use financial calculators, Microsoft Excel, and financial statements to measure the financial performance of a business entity.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 217M2: FINANCIAL RATIOS
Analyze financial statement ratios used to measure the financial performance of a business entity.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 217M3: BASIC TIME VALUE OF MONEY APPLICATIONS
Apply the Time Value of Money (TVM) concept to business decisions.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 217M4: TIME VALUE OF MONEY
Use the Time Value of Money (TVM) concepts to assess amortization, annuities, and perpetuities.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 217M5: STOCKS AND BONDS VALUATION
Apply the costs of debt and equity to stock and bond valuation.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 219: MARKETING
This is an introductory course emphasizing key concepts and issues underlying the modern practice of marketing. The use of marketing by an organization and the effects of marketing on society will be examined. Course content includes an overview of the general nature and role of marketing in the global environment, the marketing concept, buyer behavior, target marketing, and the internal environment in which marketing operates. The marketing mix is studied through the four main decision areas of products and services, distribution, promotion, and pricing.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 140; AB 224 or AB 220; and CM 220

AB 219M1: MARKETING STRATEGY
Summarize the basic components of a marketing strategy.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 219M2: GLOBAL INTERCONNECTEDNESS
Examine global interconnectedness as it applies to marketing.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 219M3: TARGET MARKETING
Discuss antecedents of target marketing in a case scenario.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

378

AB 219M4: PRODUCT AND CHANNEL STRATEGY
Apply product and place marketing mix elements to a product or service.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 219M5: PRICE AND PROMOTION STRATEGY
Apply promotion and price marketing mix elements to a product or service.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

AB 220: GLOBAL BUSINESS
This course gives students an overview of global business. Students receive an introduction to the differences in political, economic, legal, and cultural systems across different nations and the risks and opportunities these represent to a global and international business. This course serves as an introduction to the factors involved in making strategic and ethical decisions in a global business environment. Hypothetical case scenarios are used to illustrate the reality of doing business globally.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 140

AB 221: CUSTOMER SERVICE
In this course, students will learn how companies can develop customer loyalty and address personalized customer needs. Students will apply concepts learned to real-world scenarios and learn how to recapture previous customers and acquire new ones through effective relationshipbuilding strategies. Online communication tools and call center strategies will also be examined.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 107

AB 223: CONVENTION SALES AND SERVICES
This course introduces future hospitality managers to convention and tradeshow management. This overview of the functions of operations, sales, and services allows students to apply industry best practices to solve real-world issues. Students receive an inside look at how the sales, marketing, and service effort is organized and how to manage the group meetings business in hotels and convention centers.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AB 224: MICROECONOMICS
Microeconomics is an introduction to economic principles that influence decisions of individual consumers and business managers. You will examine how the law of supply and demand is reflected in pricing and quantity decisions in a variety of market situations. Close attention will be paid to how a firm’s cost structure affects decisions regarding how much to produce, given a price in a perfectly competitive market situation, compared to pricing and quantity decisions in other market structures. Consideration will be given to how individuals’ concepts of cost versus benefit enter into their buying decisions. The impact of governmental attempts to modify market outcomes will be a special focus of the course.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 220, MM 255, and AB 113 or AC 113

AB 230: FOUNDATIONS OF CONFERENCE AND EVENT PLANNING
In this course, students learn the important elements of organizing and managing conferences and events. Students practice planning and review the steps involved in the execution and management of professional conferences and events. Through examination of marketing and management concepts, budgeting best practices, and operational considerations, students review the skill sets necessary to become an effective practitioner in this field.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

379

AB 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
This course emphasizes the way in which accounting information can be used to aid management in planning and controlling business activities.
Topics covered include financial statement analysis, job order cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, performance evaluation using standard costs, differential analysis, and product pricing.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 116 and MM 255

AB 256: FEDERAL TAX
This course introduces you to the procedures to interpret tax information on an individual federal tax basis. Basic concepts in federal income taxation are explored, including gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, and credits. Introductory tax concepts, including cash and accrual methods, like-kind exchanges, and passive loss rules are covered.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 116 and MM 255

AB 270: ADVANCED MEETING PLANNING
In this course, you will learn the essential planning and organizing strategies needed for successful meeting, event, and conference creation.
Resources, contingency planning, and problem solving will be emphasized. Ethical, environmental, and diversity concerns involved in designing, coordinating, and planning professional meetings, conferences, and events will also be addressed.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AB 230

AB 290: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
This course will provide you with practical work experience in a real-world environment. You will arrange an externship working as a professional for a cooperating employer or an internship with a Kaplan University participating organization. Both the externship and internship environments will provide practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from experienced professionals. This experience will help you develop professional competencies that are desirable in the career marketplace. Externships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Must be taken in final term or have approval of the Dean.

AB 298: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
This capstone course builds on the concepts of all the courses taken within the Associate of Applied Science in Accounting and provides students with an opportunity to integrate their previous coursework in a meaningful review of their learning and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Capstone course must be taken in final term or have approval of the Dean

AB 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN MANAGEMENT
This capstone course builds on the concepts of all the courses taken within the Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration and provides students with an opportunity to integrate their previous coursework in a meaningful review of their learning and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Capstone course must be taken in final term or have approval of the Dean

Accounting AC
AC 113: ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTING MAJORS
This course emphasizes the use of accounting by managers in a business environment. Topics covered include accounting concepts, internal control, current assets, noncurrent assets, liabilities, and equity. The course is specifically designed for nonaccounting majors, and emphasis is placed on accounting areas affecting business owners and managers.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

380

AC 114: ACCOUNTING I
This course reviews the complete accounting cycle and the creation and management of accounting information for business entities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the fundamental principles and skills of the accounting profession, including recording of transactions, financial presentation of accounting data, and the uses of accounting information.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

AC 116: ACCOUNTING II
This course continues the study of accounting principles by further exploring the assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity sections of a corporation's balance sheet. This course continues to lead you to accounting mastery using an integrated learning system. This course provides further understanding of what accounting is all about and accounting's evolving role in business.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AC 114

AC 122: PAYROLL ACCOUNTING
This course introduces federal laws affecting personnel and payroll records and covers in detail how to process a payroll. Topics covered include the calculation and recording of gross pay and overtime, federal income taxes, social security taxes, and federal and state unemployment taxes.
Required federal tax and information returns and deposit rules are also covered.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AC 113 or AC 114

AC 239: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
This course emphasizes the way in which accounting information can be used to aid management in planning and controlling business activities.
Topics covered include financial statement analysis, job order cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, performance evaluation using standard costs, differential analysis, and product pricing.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AC 116 and MM 255

AC 256: FEDERAL TAX
This course introduces you to the procedures to interpret tax information on an individual federal tax basis. Basic concepts in federal income taxation are explored, including gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, and credits. Introductory tax concepts, including cash and accrual methods, like-kind exchanges, and passive loss rules are covered.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AC 116 and MM 255

AC 300: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
This course examines the full accounting process and covers selected conceptual accounting issues, aspects of financial reporting, and structure and reporting requirements for the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. In-depth analyses of current assets are also included. Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 116

AC 301: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
This course covers accounting theory and practices associated with the acquisition, cost allocation, and disposal of property, plant, and equipment; intangible assets; current liabilities, contingencies, long-term liabilities; and investments.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 300

381

AC 302: INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III
This course covers the accounting theory and practices associated with corporate accounting issues involving pensions, leases, taxes, and income recognition. In addition, disclosure requirements and the statement of cash flows are examined. Also, in-depth analysis of accounting for accounting changes and errors is also included.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 301

AC 330: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS
This course emphasizes how accounting information can be used to aid management in planning business activities, controlling operations, and making decisions that promote profitability and sustainability. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, budgeting, cost behavior, costvolume-profit analysis, variance analysis, balanced scorecard, and relevant cost analysis in the decision-making process.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 113 or AC 114, and MM 255

AC 410: AUDITING
This course examines the role of the auditor in a technological global business environment. You are exposed to the scope of auditing as a profession, the rules governing the professional ethics of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA), and the components of the auditing process, as well as the legal liabilities and responsibilities of an auditor.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 301

AC 420: COST ACCOUNTING
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of cost accounting. Topics include comparisons with financial accounting, basic cost accounting terminology and principles, cost classification, and manufacturing of inventories. You will analyze cost behavior and receive an introduction to various costing systems. The study of cost accounting for managerial purposes is also examined. Specific concepts include variance analysis, cost allocation, and cost-volume-profit analysis. Inventory costing methods, budgeting, and strategies are also explored.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 239

AC 430: ADVANCED TAX—CORPORATE
This course presents an overview of federal income tax requirements, procedures, and tax planning for business entities, with an emphasis on C and S Corporations.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 256

AC 450: ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
This course covers the accounting theory and practices associated with intercorporate investments, foreign currency issues, consolidated financial statements for business combinations, and governmental and nonprofit accounting.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 302

AC 465: ADVANCED FORENSIC ACCOUNTING
This course provides a survey of advanced forensic accounting topics. A critical component of this course includes an examination of the legal aspects of the profession. In addition to covering accounting fraud investigation and prevention techniques, you will learn how to collect evidence, provide legal support, and testify in court.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: AC 410

382

AC 490: ACCOUNTING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
This course will provide you with practical work experience in a real-world environment. You will arrange an externship working as a professional for a cooperating employer or an internship with a Kaplan University participating organization. Both the externship and internship environments will provide practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from experienced accounting professionals. This experience will help you develop professional competencies that are desirable in the career marketplace. Externships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

AC 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN ACCOUNTING
This capstone course builds on the concepts of all the courses taken within the Bachelor of Science in Accounting and provides students with an opportunity to integrate their previous coursework in a meaningful review of their learning and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

General Business BU
BU 204: MACROECONOMICS
Macroeconomics involves the theory, principles, and practices of economics that affect the national economy as a whole. Topics covered in this course include national income determination, economic growth, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, unemployment, inflation, the Federal
Reserve system, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and global economies.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: BU 224

BU 224: MICROECONOMICS
Microeconomics is an introduction to economic principles that influence decisions of individual consumers and business managers. You will examine how the law of supply and demand is reflected in pricing and quantity decisions in a variety of market situations. Close attention will be paid to how a firm’s cost structure affects decisions regarding how much to produce, given a price in a perfectly competitive market situation, compared to pricing and quantity decisions in other market structures. Consideration will be given to how individuals’ concepts of cost versus benefit enter into their buying decisions. The impact of governmental attempts to modify market outcomes will be a special focus of the course.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 220, MM 255, and AB 113 or AC 113

BU 481: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY I
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

BU 482: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY II
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: None

383

BU 483: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY III
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: None

BU 484: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY IV
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: None

BU 485: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY V
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

BU 486: INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY VI
In this course, students in the School of Business and Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed studies project focused on a self-selected research project. Students will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to their professional goals. There is flexibility built into the course with the intent of giving students some options to synthesize and apply the concepts presented into their own unique career field, company, and/or industry.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: None

Finance FI
FI 490: FINANCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING—CAREER ENGAGEMENT
This course will provide you with practical work experience in a real-world environment. You will arrange an externship working as a professional for a cooperating employer or an internship with a Kaplan University participating organization. Both the externship and internship environments will provide practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from experienced professionals. This experience will help you develop professional competencies that are desirable in the career marketplace. Externships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

FI 499: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN FINANCE
This capstone course builds on the concepts of all the courses taken within the Bachelor of Science in Finance and provides students with an opportunity to integrate their previous coursework in a meaningful review of their learning and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

384

Human Resources HR
HR 400: EMPLOYMENT AND STAFFING
In this course, students explore the role of personnel administration in the area of human resource management by examining the areas of employee recruiting, retention, and development. Topics focus on how an organization can implement effective recruiting and development policies. These factors will include the topics of compensation and benefits packages, recruitment sources and techniques, electronic recruitment, competency-based recruiting and interviewing, why employees leave, rewards, recognition and opportunities, and balancing work with personal life. Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: MT 203 or enrollment in the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate

HR 410: EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on the issues related to employee training and employee development. Topics focus on how an organization’s mission and goals provide guidance for employee training and development; and how to assess an organization’s job needs in terms of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by employees to complete the organization’s mission and achieve its goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: MT 203 or enrollment in the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate

HR 420: EMPLOYMENT LAW
This course focuses on the issues related to federal statutes that affect the human resources function. Among topics addressed are employment relationships and procedures, employment discrimination, and employment regulations. Some specific issues covered in the course are EEO, affirmative action, OSHA, employee privacy, and wrongful discharge.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: MT 203 or enrollment in the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate

HR 435: COMPENSATION
This course examines different methods for developing a compensation strategy and the use of compensation strategies for motivating and rewarding employee performance. Compensation and reward systems are important tools that are used to motivate employees and to gain employee commitment to a company's mission. Methods of determining the relative value of jobs, in relation to compensation, are also examined.
This course covers how to assess and diagnose compensation issues and how to develop appropriate solutions. In addition, students analyze the role of the government and identify methods for managing compensation structures.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: MT 203 or enrollment in the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate

HR 485: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This course focuses on the importance of a strategic approach to human resources. It looks at the elements that support these strategies as well as the factors that can affect them. You will explore how to effectively manage human resources to achieve organizational goals and advance the strategies of an organization.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: MT 203 or enrollment in the Human Resources Postbaccalaureate Certificate

385

Information Systems and Technology IT
IT 104: INTRODUCTION TO CYBERSECURITY
Entities and organizations must be able to protect not only their network infrastructure, but also their personnel and customers from data loss and identity theft. This course introduces the topic of cybersecurity and how it has evolved over the last several decades. In this course, you will examine the concepts and challenges of cybersecurity from its evolution over the past decades to the increasing cyber threats that exist today. Evolving trends that impact cybersecurity will be discussed, including the use of mobile devices, cloud computing, and the increased sophistication of attacks. You will study cybersecurity’s role in physical and cyber incidents. Cybersecurity design is examined from a high level, as is the role of the cybersecurity professional in today’s information technology environment. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to pursue relevant certifications. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for an examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take an exam or to become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 111: PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR BEGINNERS
This course exposes students to the fundamentals of programming using a simplified programming language. Students practice modularization using a variety of methods. Students learn the value of creating reusable objects. Students also use the fundamental programming concepts of assignment, iteration, and decision making.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 117: INTRODUCTION TO WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT
Learning the value of self-promotion equips you to demonstrate your skills to an audience. In this course, you investigate Internet technologies.
You learn the basic concepts of web development along with basic web page design. By creating an individual online portfolio or biography using HTML, HTML5, and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), you develop skills for today and tomorrow.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND
This course teaches students to use the current Microsoft Office suite of applications. Topics include an introduction to Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and cloud-based file management systems. Students will also learn how to analyze appropriate software applications to address solutions within a profession. Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 133M1: OPERATING SYSTEM AND SERVICES
Use the computer operating system and cloud-based services to set preferences and manage files.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

IT 133M2: WORD PROCESSING SKILLS
Create documents using various functions of word processing software.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

IT 133M3: SPREADSHEET SKILLS
Create spreadsheets using basic spreadsheet functions.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

386

IT 133M4: COMPUTER PRESENTATION SKILLS
Create computer-generated, on-screen presentations.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

IT 133M5: SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS AND ANALYSIS
Analyze appropriate software application(s) to address solutions within a specific discipline.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

IT 153: SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS
This course examines spreadsheet concepts including calculations, formulas, built-in functions, and spreadsheet design. You will create spreadsheets and manipulate data to solve business problems. The course further explores topics such as charts, data tables, pivot tables, and what-if analysis.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS
This course is an introduction to relational database management systems. You will use a relational database management system to create and maintain a database. You will create filters, sorts, queries, forms, and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to meet user requirements. Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Students will explore the basic concepts of information technology including hardware, software, and networks. The student will gain a practical understanding of how computer hardware and operating systems work. Topics include personal computer configuration and maintenance, along with the fundamentals of system software installation and administration.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 213: SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—INTRODUCTORY
This course introduces the fundamentals of software engineering, demonstrating how the fundamentals are the same across multiple programming languages. The core principles found in every programming language are investigated. You will design, develop, debug, and test simple applications using your choice from the programming language options.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 111 and IT 117 | Corequisite: IT 234 (recommended)

IT 214: FOUNDATIONS OF WEB DESIGN
This is a fast-paced course in web design. You will learn the basic concepts of web page design. The concepts begin with the planning stages of site mapping and storyboards. Elements such as tables, forms, rollover buttons, hyperlinks, text formatting and management, navigation systems, and inserting multimedia will be explored. By creating an individual online portfolio or biography and implementing the current versions of
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), you will develop skills for today and tomorrow.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 111 and IT 117 (or equivalent)

IT 222: INTRODUCTION TO CLOUD COMPUTING
This course is a survey of cloud computing from both a business and a personal perspective. Cloud computing is an emerging technology that impacts all IT professions, including network, web, and application development as well as network security. You will learn the key characteristics and benefits of cloud computing. The course will cover features of private, public, hybrid, and community clouds.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

387

IT 232: SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS—INTERMEDIATE
This is an intermediate course in the design and development of programs offering students a choice of implementation and demonstrating how design and programming concepts are universal. Students will apply software design techniques, software process models, object-oriented programming concepts, and secure data-handling techniques. Students will design, develop, debug, and test intermediate-level applications using their choice from the programming language options.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 213 | Corequisite: IT 302 (recommended for Bachelor of Science in Information Technology students)

IT 234: DATABASE FOUNDATIONS
This course prepares you to learn database programming. You will be exposed to the fundamental concepts of database management systems and SQL programming language. This course will provide you with the business context in which data is used and how it is transformed into information. You will identify the information needs and general usage of data within the modern business context and link the use of relational database management systems to the data needs of the organization.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 163

IT 247: FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB GRAPHICS
You will learn how to create appropriate web graphics using popular image editing tools. Throughout the course, you will create a collection of custom graphics that will be displayed in an e-Portfolio layout. Topics will include resizing, resolution, optimization, digital photo enhancement, custom banner and button creation, and more.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 214

IT 261: DESKTOP ADMINISTRATION
This course prepares networking students to install, configure, and administer a desktop operating system. You will learn to automate operating system installation, set up and manage user accounts, and configure local file systems. You will learn to configure and troubleshoot both local and network printers, manage and troubleshoot access to shared folders, and recover from system failures.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 190

IT 262: CERTIFIED ETHICAL HACKING I
This course covers the tools and procedures needed to perform ethical hacking. Ethical hacking, which is also known as penetration testing, is a procedure employed by organizations where the tester attempts to penetrate or compromise a computer or network. In so doing, organizational vulnerabilities are brought to light, which allows the organization to mitigate the vulnerabilities uncovered. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to continue your studies for the EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker certification. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS
This course introduces the concepts behind today’s networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components, such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 275: LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION
This introductory Linux course prepares you to install, configure, and administer Linux as a network operating system. You will learn both command line and graphical user interface administration with full-feature Linux distributions. Emphasis is placed on applied skills that address real-world challenges such as managing file structure, network services, and system security.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 273

388

IT 277: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY PROFESSIONAL I
This course covers the essential material comprising the first two study domains in the Certified Information Systems Security Professional
(CISSP) Common Body of Knowledge (CBK). These two domains include asset security and access management. The information covered is vital in gaining a threshold understanding of the field of cybersecurity, and will enable you to implement access control methods, prevent access control attacks, and select controls and countermeasures based on security evaluation models. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to pursue CISSP certification. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

IT 278: NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
In many organizations, the network administrator is the wizard behind the curtain. Network connections between users and computers seem to magically perform the transmissions required for daily operations. In this course, you are introduced to basic network administration. You install and configure a network operating system in a virtualized environment and practice administrative tasks. You perform hands-on exercises demonstrating server management, user account creation, file access, storage backup, and security settings.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 273

IT 279: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY PROFESSIONAL II
This course covers the essential material comprising three study domains in the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
Common Body of Knowledge (CBK). These three domains are security engineering, network security, and software development security. The information covered is vital in gaining a threshold understanding of the field of cybersecurity, and will enable you to assess the vulnerabilities of security solutions, design secure communication channels, and apply security controls in the software development environment. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to pursue CISSP certification. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 277

IT 283: NETWORKING WITH TCP/IP
This course provides a thorough examination of the protocols and services in the TCP/IP protocol suite. Students gain an understanding of how network traffic is encapsulated and transported by TCP/IP on local area networks and on wide area networks, including the Internet. Students learn about message addressing and forwarding, and how network errors are resolved.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 273

IT 286: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY
This course introduces you to the essential knowledge required to secure today’s networks. You will learn to identify threats and vulnerabilities and to apply effective strategies to prevent data breaches. The course discusses topics such as risk assessment; compliance and operational security; access control and authorization management; intrusion detection; application hardening; malicious attacks; and cryptography. It outlines a security professional’s responsibilities and discusses the skills needed to protect an organization’s data and network infrastructure.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: IT 273

IT 296: ASSOCIATE'S-LEVEL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
This course gives associate's-level students practical job experience in the information technology field. The externship provides students an opportunity to learn about the IT career field through practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from an IT professional. This experience will enrich students' technology skills and provide a better understanding of the level of expertise needed to be successful in their career.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Completion of all core courses; minimum GPA of 2.0

389

IT 299: ASSOCIATE'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
This course is designed to build on the concepts of all information technology courses you have taken as a part of your degree plan. The capstone course integrates problem-solving techniques and implementation solutions studied in the information technology courses. You will research particular problems or issues you select, analyze the major concerns, and recommend viable information technology solutions to resolve or improve the problems or issues.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

IT 301: PROJECT MANAGEMENT I
This course introduces you to the principles of project management. You will gain knowledge of the project management skills and processes needed to select, initiate, and plan a project. You will explore the project management knowledge areas. Topics include creating the project charter, developing project scope statements, creating the project schedule and budget, and risk planning.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: None

IT 302: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION
This course introduces you to the field of human computer interaction (HCI). You will survey HCI history and theory, and examine standard principles that are necessary to produce effective interface designs for the consumer. You will also learn about development methodologies, evaluation techniques, task analysis, and prototyping. Activities include observation and analysis of various types of interfaces, plus the use of professional tools to create a new interface design.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: 200-level or above IT course; upper-level students only

IT 303: APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT, VIRTUALIZATION, AND THE CLOUD
This advanced computer virtualization course will include hands-on practice and is designed for individuals who have an understanding of operating systems and programming concepts. Students study several methods of applying virtualization locally and in a hosted environment.
Students will create a workable software program within a virtual server and in a cloud service solution.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 222 and IT 232

IT 316: COMPUTER FORENSICS
This course explores the pervasive nature of illegal and unauthorized activity occurring in cyberspace: computer crime. You will learn about the many types of computer crime and the structured procedures deployed in its investigation. This will include a systematic investigative approach of both corporate and criminal-related offenses. You will learn data-retrieval principles including onsite data collection, laboratory data retrieval, and live network data retrieval. You will learn how current computer forensics tools are used for data acquisitions to data analysis. This course will also discuss how computer crimes present unique vulnerabilities to computer systems due to the global nature of the Internet.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: None

IT 331: TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE
This course explores the concepts and purpose of information technology infrastructure. Emphasis is placed on expanding your knowledge of computer networks and data transmissions and applying those concepts to an organization’s technology requirements.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: 200-level or above IT course; upper-level students only

IT 332: PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE
This course introduces you to the background of information systems architecture. You will learn a holistic approach to both hardware and software architecture design from a broad systems perspective. Both a business and technical focus will be covered with concrete examples of current technologies and related managerial issues.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 331

390

IT 350: DATABASE MODELING AND DESIGN WITH TRANSACT-SQL (T-SQL)
This course covers theories and techniques of database design and incorporates advanced concepts of the database language Transact-SQL (TSQL) for creating efficient database implementations. You will expand your developmental skills by capturing the business requirements and creating the conceptual design using a modeling tool for generating the entity-relationship diagram (ERD). You will transform the conceptual design into the logical design in order to create and manipulate the database objects. Finally, you will use a high-level programming language and connect to an MS SQL Server database for displaying organized information to users.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 234

IT 358: INTERMEDIATE ORACLE QUERY DESIGN
This course covers intermediate to advanced concepts of database query design and reporting tools using Oracle. You will practice Oracle SQL functions and PL/SQL programming, including triggers and stored procedures, to execute queries and functions.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 234 or IT 350

IT 374: LINUX SECURITY
This course introduces Kali Linux as a penetration testing and security auditing platform with advanced tools to identify, detect, and exploit any vulnerabilities uncovered in the target network environment. You will explore several security assessment tools necessary to conduct penetration testing in their respective categories, such as target scoping, information gathering, discovery, enumeration, and vulnerability. You will develop practical penetration testing skills by demonstrating hacker tools and techniques that reflect real-world attack scenarios from a business perspective in today's digital age.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 275

IT 375: WINDOWS ENTERPRISE ADMINISTRATION
This advanced course in Microsoft Windows enterprise administration prepares you to install, configure, and manage key network services and
Active Directory. You will perform administrative tasks such as network service installation and configuration; Active Directory installation;
Group Policy design and configuration; and network and Active Directory security configuration. You will learn the theory behind Active
Directory design and operation; and complete hands-on labs and projects that develop the skills needed for real-world settings.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 278

IT 388: ROUTING AND SWITCHING I
This course is the first of two routing and switching courses that prepare you to design, configure, and maintain network routing and switching.
You learn the basic concepts, protocols, and functions of network routers and switches. Emphasis is placed on hands-on practice of configuration and troubleshooting using live and simulated labs.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 283

IT 390: INTRUSION DETECTION AND INCIDENCE RESPONSE
This course provides an introduction to intrusion detection systems available to protect networks from cybercriminals. You will explore various security concepts and the basics of security attacks. You will install and configure various intrusion detection system tools. Topics include principles and classifications of intrusion detection systems, incident response process, and response types. Additionally, the course presents insight into intrusion detection and forensics and incident response strategies required to protect critical assets.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 286

IT 391: ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING WEB AND MOBILITY
This course focuses on advanced design and programming concepts and techniques offering you a choice of implementation and demonstrating how advanced concepts apply across a variety of languages. You will develop advanced software, web, and mobile applications, while applying concepts related to data structures, algorithms, web services, graphics, mobile, and multimedia. You also learn how to create interactive applications across a variety of platforms (traditional applications, websites, and mobile applications).
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 232, IT 234, and IT 302

391

IT 395: CERTIFIED ETHICAL HACKING II
This course continues concepts introduced in IT 262 covering the tools and procedures needed to perform ethical hacking. More advanced penetration testing procedures are covered as well as how to incorporate the knowledge learned into a cohesive set of procedures to help organizations find potential vulnerabilities. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to continue the pursuit of the EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker certification. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 262

IT 400: ETHICS IN CYBERSECURITY
New innovations within information technology continue to evolve around the world, creating ethical challenges and concerns for information technology professionals. This course will examine ethical and legal concerns with the use of information technology. Ethical issues will be examined as they relate to common information systems. Additional topics including privacy, regulations, as well as societal and cultural influences on decision making will be examined.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: None

IT 401: PROJECT MANAGEMENT II
This course is the second of two project management courses and explores more advanced topics. Students will gain knowledge of the project management skills and processes needed to execute, control, and close a project. Topics include planning project resources, developing the project team, conducting procurements, measuring project performance, controlling work results, and applying professional responsibility.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 301

IT 402: IT CONSULTING SKILLS
This course will introduce you to the theory and practice of IT consulting. You examine the processes and techniques associated with the consulting field. Business aptitude skills will be taught including communication, ethics, presentation, and leadership skills. Additionally, project definition and analysis, project planning, gathering user and project requirements, executing projects, time management, and the history of consulting will be examined. Through case studies, you prepare a project proposal and a persuasive presentation for an organization.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: 200-level or above IT course; upper-level students only

IT 410: CERTIFIED INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY PROFESSIONAL III
This course primarily addresses two domains in the Certified Information Systems Security Professional CBK (Common Body of Knowledge).
The two domains are (1) security assessment and testing and (2) security operations. The security assessment and testing domain explores vulnerability assessments and secure software testing strategies. The domain of security operations details how to manage change and respond to incidents. There will also be a discussion of two important topics that were not examined in Domain 1 of the CISSP I course. These topics are professional ethics, and legal and regulatory issues. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the foundational knowledge necessary to pursue CISSP certification. While the course may provide you with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan
University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 279

IT 411: DIGITAL FORENSICS
In this course, students learn about computer forensics and techniques used to perform computer forensics examinations. Students learn how to gather and protect evidence used in prosecuting computer crimes. Topics in this course include acquiring digital evidence, bookmarking data, file signature analysis, hash analysis, and other forensic techniques. This course is designed, among other things, to provide the student with the requisite knowledge to sit for the EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCE) exam. While the course may provide the student with the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee the student’s eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 286

392

IT 412: INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY
Businesses must be able to protect their networks and infrastructures from security attacks. In this course, you learn to investigate system vulnerabilities and implement security solutions. Topics in this course include access control, application security, business continuity and disaster recovery planning, cryptography, information security and risk management, compliance and investigations, operations security, physical security, security architecture and design, telecommunications, and network security. This course is designed, among other things, to provide you with the requisite knowledge to sit for the Certified Information Systems Security Professional exam. While the course may provide the knowledge necessary to sit for the examination, Kaplan University cannot guarantee your eligibility either to take this exam or become certified.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 286

IT 441: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 442: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 443: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 444: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 445: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 446: DIRECTED STUDIES, SCHOOL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
In this course, students in the School of Information Technology will engage in an independent, directed-study project focused on a studentsubmitted topic of inquiry. The student will select a topic of inquiry that is of interest and relevant to his or her professional goals.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: CM 220; upper-level students only

IT 458: ORACLE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION
This course covers database administration using Oracle tools. You will focus on the following: installing database management software and utilities, controlling access to data and resources, troubleshooting an Oracle database, the backup and recovery of Oracle databases, and resolving common performance problems using Oracle.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 358

393

IT 460: SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
This course provides an overview of the system development life cycle (SDLC), including the modification and design process. You will learn to choose a system development methodology and evaluate the impact on the organization's strategic plan. It emphasizes the factors for effective communication with users and team members and all those associated with development and maintenance of the system.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: 200-level or above IT course; upper-level students only

IT 471: ROUTING AND SWITCHING II
This course is the second of two routing and switching courses and explores more advanced topics. You will design, configure, reconfigure, and maintain network routing and switching devices. You will also learn advanced concepts in protocols, resource access, and disaster recovery.
Emphasis is placed on planning, proposing, and securing network infrastructure.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 388

IT 478: WEB SERVERS AND SECURITY
This course teaches you to install and configure popular web server software. You will learn to determine user access levels, as well as server authentication and server-side programming. Various issues involving web security are discussed, including web/client security and intrusion detection and recovery.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 273

IT 479: BACHELOR’S-LEVEL CYBERSECURITY INTERNSHIP
This course is taken at the conclusion of the cybersecurity degree and incorporates practical job experience with the skills and knowledge gained from prior coursework. You will work with instructors and other students on real-world projects that may include security system design, forensic analysis, or recommendations for an organization’s security infrastructure. This course will enable you and your team members to practice your problem-solving talents. Along with timelines and project plans, your team will consider other business constraints. As is a requirement for most information technology projects, each security project may include evaluation mechanisms, hands-on demonstrations, examples for stakeholders, and a final roll-up of future project improvements. Internships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term. Students who fail this course on the first attempt may not reenroll in this course without the Dean’s approval.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

IT 481: ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
This course addresses advanced software design and development concepts, offering you a choice of implementations demonstrating how the concepts apply across a variety of languages. You will apply analysis and benchmarking, database creation and usage, data in motion and data at rest security, threading, reentrancy, and advanced testing concepts. You will also learn how to package software for distribution.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 350

IT 484: CYBERSECURITY POLICIES
This course teaches you how to defend organizational resources by implementing and maintaining cybersecurity policies. Cybersecurity policies are used to support defense of data availability, integrity, and confidentiality. By establishing and applying effective security policies, organizations can keep valuable data safe. Topics include applying cybersecurity policies to access controls, cybersecurity operations and administration, risk analysis, incident response, and recovery. This course also teaches you cybersecurity polices for securing publically available resources and Web applications.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 388

394

IT 488: SOFTWARE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT USING AGILE
This project-based course concludes the multiplatform software development series of courses and allows you to apply your learning to the development of a software product in an agile team software development environment. You will explore the concepts of agile development and then implement those concepts as you work on an agile development team, designing and developing a software product using an agile software development life cycle, from concept to packaged product.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: IT 481 and IT 350

IT 489: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
This course gives students practical job experience in the information technology field. The internship provides students an opportunity to learn about the IT career field through practical, real-world experiences and mentoring from an IT professional. This experience will enrich students’ technology skills and provide a better understanding of the level of expertise needed to be successful in their career. Internships must be preapproved by the Dean prior to the start of the term. Students who fail this course on the first attempt may not reenroll in this course without the
Dean’s approval.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Dean

IT 497: BACHELOR’S CAPSTONE IN CYBERSECURITY
The Bachelor’s Capstone in Cybersecurity is designed to build on the concepts of all information technology and security courses you have taken as a part of your degree plan. The capstone project integrates problem-solving techniques and the development and implementation of viable, student-developed solutions to meet an identified technology or design need in a business or institutional environment. You will be directed to work collaboratively to achieve the learning objectives for this course.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Program Chair

IT 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
The Bachelor's Capstone in Information Technology is designed to build on the concepts of all information technology courses you have taken as a part of your degree plan. The capstone project integrates problem-solving techniques and the development and implementation of viable, student-developed solutions to meet an identified technology or design need in a business or institutional environment.
Quarter Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite: Last term or permission from the Program Chair

Management MT
MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course provides an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to realworld management problems and scenarios. Implications for managing change within the context of a global economy and other dynamic environmental forces are also examined.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
In this course, students will examine the processes involved in human resources from a managerial perspective. Students will examine the functions of human resource management, including job analysis, staffing, performance appraisal, training and development, compensation, labor relations, and legal requirements.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: None

395

MT 203M1: EMPLOYMENT LAWS
Identify the laws of employment practices that managers follow.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

MT 203M2: RECRUITING AND SELECTING EMPLOYEES
Explain how companies link compensation and evaluation to organizational objectives.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

MT 203M3: LINKING COMPENSATION TO STRATEGY
Explain how companies link compensation and evaluation to organizational objectives.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

MT 203M4: TRAINING METHODS FOR IMPROVING PERFORMANCE
Describe training methods for improving employee performance.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

MT 203M5: CULTURAL LITERACY
Apply cultural literacy in personal and professional environments.
Quarter Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: None

MT 209: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
In this course, students will enhance problem-solving skills and develop a practical understanding of small business management principles.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: MT 140

MT 217: FINANCE
This course covers basic financial concepts, principles, and techniques used in making corporate financial planning decisions. It provides students with the tools necessary for analyzing the time value of money, financial analysis and planning, the capital budgeting process and decisions, and long-term financing, and introduces international capital markets.
Quarter Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite: AC 113 or AC 114, and MM 255 or equivalent

MT 219: MARKETING
This is an introductory course emphasizing key concepts and issues underlying the modern practice of marketing. The use of marketing by an organization and the effects of marketing on society will be examined. Course content includes an overview of the general nature and role of marketing in the global environment, the marketing concept, buyer behavior, target marketing, and the internal environment in which marketing operates. The marketing mix is studied through the four main decision areas of products and services, distribution, promotion, and p