Catechism

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CATECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Table of Contents

PROLOGUE

I. The life of man - to know and love God nn. 1-3 II. Handing on the Faith: Catechesis nn. 4-10 III. The Aim and Intended Readership of the Catechism nn. 11-12 IV. Structure of this Catechism nn. 13-17 V. Practical Directions for Using this Catechism nn. 18-22 VI. Necessary Adaptations nn. 23-25

PART ONE: THE PROFESSION OF FAITH

SECTION ONE "I BELIEVE" - "WE BELIEVE" n. 26

CHAPTER ONE MAN'S CAPACITY FOR GOD nn. 27-49 I. The Desire for God nn. 27-30 II. Ways of Coming to Know God nn. 31-35 III. The Knowledge of God According to the Church nn. 36-38 IV. How Can We Speak about God? nn.39-43 IN BRIEF nn. 44-49

CHAPTER TWO GOD COMES TO MEET MAN n. 50 Article 1 THE REVELATION OF GOD I. God Reveals His "Plan of Loving Goodness" nn. 51-53 II. The Stages of Revelation nn. 54-64 III. Christ Jesus -- "Mediator and Fullness of All Revelation" nn. 6567 IN BRIEF nn. 68-73 Article 2 THE TRANSMISSION OF DIVINE REVELATION n. 74 I. The Apostolic Tradition nn.75-79 II. The Relationship Between Tradition and Sacred Scripture nn. 80-83 III. The Interpretation of the Heritage of Faith nn. 84-95 IN BRIEF nn. 96-100 Article 3 SACRED SCRIPTURE I. Christ - The Unique Word of Sacred Scripture nn. 101-104 II. Inspiration and Truth of Sacred Scripture nn. 105-108 III. The Holy Spirit, Interpreter of Scripture nn. 109-119 IV. The Canon of Scripture nn. 120-130 V. Sacred Scripture in the Life of the Church nn. 131-133 IN BRIEF nn. 134-141

CHAPTER THREE MAN'S RESPONSE TO GOD nn. 142-143 Article 1 I BELIEVE I. The Obedience of Faith nn. 144-149 II. "I Know Whom I Have Believed" nn. 150-152 III. The Characteristics of Faith nn. 153-165 Article 2 WE BELIEVE nn. 166-167

I. "Lord, Look Upon the Faith of Your Church" nn. 168-169 II. The Language of Faith nn. 170-171 III. Only One Faith nn. 172-175 IN BRIEF nn. 176-184…...

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