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Cellular Disease: Parkinson's

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Cellular Disease: Parkinson’s Disease

One characteristic that all living beings share is the fact that they are considered to be highly organized, complex creatures. One of the most complex creatures are human beings. The human body contains thousands of genes, proteins and other cellular membranes. Each cell responds to chemical signals from the body or the environment and modifies its behavior in response to signals (Tremblay, 2010). When these cells behave differently from their intended design, the dysfunction is called cellular disease. Cellular disease can include a mutation of the DNA cells, an increase of the amount of cells, insufficiencies in existing cells, or loss of vital cells.
Parkinson disease is considered to be one of the most common cellular diseases. It affects the nervous system and causes its victims to experience loss of muscle control. The disease takes place when there is a problem with certain nerve cells in the brain. These nerve cells produce a chemical called dopamine that sends signals to the part of the brain that controls movement. It allows muscles to move smoothly and operate as intended (WebMd, 2005). When the cellular disease known as Parkinson’s is present, these nerve cells break down causing a scarcity in the dopamine that is being produced. When there is a deficiency in dopamine, the body tends to move uncontrollably.
Parkinson disease is considered a chronic illness. As time progresses the symptoms become gradually worse. Studies have shown that by the time primary symptoms appear, individuals with Parkinson's disease will have lost 60% to 80% or more of the dopamine-producing cells in the brain (Sietske N. Heyn, 2012). The main symptoms of Parkinson’s are tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Tremors are the most common sign of the

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