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Central Nervous System

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By neisemonie
Words 393
Pages 2
Peggie DeVoise
Chapter 2 Review
Methods

Correlation or association: simultaneous variation in two variables
Causality:
the notion that a change in one factor results in a corresponding change in another
Reverse Causality: a situation in which the researcher believes that a results in a change in B, but B in fact , is causing A
Dependent Variable: the out come that the researcher is trying to explain
Independent Variable: a measured factor that the researcher believes has a casual impact on the dependent variable
Hypothesis:
A proposed relationship between two variables
Ope rationalization: the process of assigning a precise method for measuring a term being examined for use in a particular study
Validity:
the extent to which an instrument measures what it is intended to measure
Reliability:
likelihood of obtaining consistent results using the same measure
Generalizability:
the extent to which we complain our findings inform us about a group larger than the one we studied
Reflectivity:
analyzing and critically considering our own role in, and affect on, our research
Feminists methodology: a set of systems or methods that treat w omen’s experience as legitimate empirical theoretical resources that promote social science for women, thinking public sociology but for a specific half of the public and that take into account the researcher as much as the overt subject matter
Participant Observation: a qualitative research method that seeks to observe social actions and practice
Survey:
an order series of questions intended to elicit information from respondents
Historical Methods: research that collects data from written reports newspaper articles, journals, transcripts, television, programs, diaries, artwork, and other artifacts that date to a prior time under study
Comparative Research: a methodology by which two or more such as...

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