Free Essay

Changing Our Lives

In: English and Literature

Submitted By knabiye
Words 11912
Pages 48
College Credit Through Advanced Standing

Produced by the Office of Academic Services

This manual is accurate as of the date of publication. As new information becomes available, it will be posted to the online version, available through the Academic Services web site, www.nvcc.edu/aboutnova/directories--offices/administrative-offices/academic/index.html.

Revised June 2012

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 3 PURPOSE .................................................................................................................................3 TYPES OF ADVANCED STANDING ...................................................................................................3 GENERAL PROCEDURES ...............................................................................................................4 EVALUATION RESPONSIBILITIES .....................................................................................................5 SECTION 1—CREDITS FROM POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS ........................................ 7 GENERAL CONDITIONS ................................................................................................................7 GENERAL EDUCATION TRANSFER CREDIT FOR STUDENTS WITH PREVIOUS DEGREES ..................................9 EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS .................................................................................10 SECTION 2—CREDITS EARNED IN NON-TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS ................................... 11 CLINICAL CODING ASSOCIATE OR CLINICAL CODING SPECIALIST ............................................................11 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACADEMIES .....................................................................................................12 FAIRFAX COUNTY CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACADEMY ..............................................................................12 NORTHERN VIRGINIA CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACADEMY .........................................................................13 PRINCE WILLIAM CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACADEMY ..............................................................................13 VIRGINIA CRIMINAL JUSTICE ACADEMIES ......................................................................................14 VIRGINIA STATE POLICE ACADEMY ..............................................................................................14 EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT ................................................................................................15 ARMY CHILD AND YOUTH S ERVICES TRAINING ................................................................................15 CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE ................................................................................................15 FAIRFAX COUNTY OFFICE FOR CHILDREN SCHOOL READINESS CERTIFICATE ...........................................15 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN BASIC & EMT-C CERTIFICATION (VIRGINIA ), EMT-PARAMEDIC (NATIONAL) .............................................................................................................................16 FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY .........................................................................................................17 VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF FIRE PROGRAMS AND THE NATIONAL BOARD ON FIRE SERVICE PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS .......................................................................................................................17 OTHER CREDIT FOR FIRE T RAINING ..............................................................................................17 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CREDIT AND WAIVER ......................................................................................17 LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE (LPN) ...............................................................................................18 MARKETING – SALES UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL SELLING ..................................................................18 MILITARY RELATED EXPERIENCES ..................................................................................................18 MILITARY SERVICE COURSES ......................................................................................................18 MILITARY SERVICE/BASIC TRAINING ............................................................................................18 ARMY MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES (MOS) .....................................................................19 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF THE AIR FORCE .....................................................................................19 MARINE CORPS (MCE), NAVY (NER) AND COAST GUARD (CGR) RATINGS & SCHOOLS .........................19 MARINE CORPS CORRESPONDENCE COURSES (MCI) .......................................................................19 OFFICE SKILLS TRAINING .............................................................................................................20 COMMUNITY PRESERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (CPDC) ............................................20 TRAINING FUTURES ..................................................................................................................20 1

Physical Education ..........................................................................................................................20 NOVA Basketball, Soccer and Volleyball Sports Teams ............................................................... 20 AMERICAN RED CROSS LIFEGUARD /FIRST AID CERTIFICATIONAND CPR/AED FOR LIFEGUARDS ....................20 WAIVER FOR ACTIVE DUTY FIRE FIGHTERS AND POLICE .....................................................................20 RESPIRATORY THERAPIST .............................................................................................................21 CRT .....................................................................................................................................21 RRT .....................................................................................................................................21 NEONATAL/PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST ...............................................................................................21 SECTION 3—CREDIT BY EXAM ....................................................................................... 22 ABITUR ...................................................................................................................................22 ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMINATION PROGRAM (AP) .....................................................................22 AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION ........................................................................................24 ARI – GAMA (AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION): HVAC APPRENTICESHIP TO DEGREE...................24 ICE/ARI EPA EXAMS (VIRGINIA MASTER MECHANICAL LICENSE ) ......................................................24 ASSESSMENT BY LOCAL EXAM (ABLE) ............................................................................................24 CAMBRIDGE, UNIVERSITY OF , ADVANCED LEVEL EXAMINATIONS ..........................................................25 CERTIFIED MANAGER (CM) .........................................................................................................25 CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL LEGAL SECRETARY (PLS) ...........................................................................26 CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY (CPS) ....................................................................................26 COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) ............................................................................27 DSST PROGRAM (FORMERLY KNOWN AS DANTES) ..........................................................................29 EXCELSIOR COLLEGE EXAMINATIONS (FORMERLY PEP) .......................................................................30 INSTITUTE FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMPUTER PROFESSIONALS (ICCP) ..................................................30 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) ............................................................................................31 MEDICAL/CLINICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION .............................................................32 PHLEBOTOMY CERTIFICATION AND /OR VALID DOCUMENTATION OF EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE .......................32 NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR A UTOMOTIVE SERVICE EXCELLENCE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION TESTS (ASE) .....................................................................................33 SAT II .....................................................................................................................................34 SECTION 4—CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCES - PLACE ........................................................ 35 SECTION 5—CREDIT FOR ARTICULATED HIGH SCHOOL COURSES ...................................... 36

2

INTRODUCTION
Advanced Standing policies at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) are consistent with Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) principles and with Virginia Community College System (VCCS) policy. “SACS is the regional institutional accrediting organization for NOVA. Accreditation is a process of external quality review used by higher education in the United States to scrutinize (examine) colleges, universities, and higher education programs for quality assurance and quality improvement. Accreditation in the United States is more than 100 years old, emerging from concerns to protect public health and safety and to serve the public interests. “In the United States, accreditation is carried out by (six) private, nonprofit organizations designed for this specific purpose. External quality review of higher education is a non-governmental enterprise. In other countries, accreditation and quality assurance activities are typically carried out by government.” (Accredited Institutions of Postsecondary Education, Edited by Kenneth A. Von Alt, 2008, American Council on Education) Purpose This manual describes the current opportunities for obtaining advanced standing college credit at NOVA. Procedures are designed to respect the balance between upholding academic standards for the College and recognizing a student’s previous learning experiences which apply to her/his chosen curriculum. Types of Advanced Standing Transfer credit or advanced standing may be sought by NOVA students for educational experiences that fall into four basic categories. Section 1: Credits earned in regionally accredited post-secondary institutions. Credit is generally acceptable for transfer if it is earned from an institution that is accredited by the Commission on Colleges or the Commission on Higher Education of one of the nine regional accrediting agencies in the United States and is comparable to the required course credit in the student’s chosen NOVA curriculum. (See accreditation explanation above.) NOVA will also recognize credits earned at another college or university during the college’s/university’s candidacy for accreditation; or in the two years prior to the college’s/university’s full accreditation by such commissions of a regional accrediting association, whichever is the shorter period of time. Credit also may be transferred from institutions if the Transfer of Credit Practices of Designated Educational Institutions, published by American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, states that credit from the institution “is generally accepted for courses that are appropriate to the reporting institution’s baccalaureate programs.” Credits earned at post-secondary institutions without regional accreditation do not transfer to NOVA even if the institution is accredited through a different commission such as a National Accrediting Organization or Specialized and Professional Accreditors. However, in some cases where a post-secondary institution offers specialized educational opportunities (culinary institutes, etc.) and the institution is empowered by a state to award associate degrees or above, NOVA faculty may pre-approve the recommendation to award equivalent transfer credit for courses within a specific discipline. Only those courses which have been specifically evaluated will be accepted for transfer, and of those courses, only credit earned after the date specified in the review will be accepted. Courses will be transferred at full credit value. Totally dissimilar and unrelated courses will not be grouped together to fulfill NOVA sequential course requirements.

3

Section 2: Credits earned in non-traditional educational/training programs (military, industry, state and federal government). Students may or may not be granted credit for courses or programs offered by employers, professional organizations and other agencies only if those courses or programs have been evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE) College Credit Recommendation Service at http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template.cfm?Section=CCRS. ACE’s recommendations for college credit for workforce training in general can be viewed at http://www2.acenet.edu/nationalguide/index.cfm?fuseaction=browse.main. ACE’s recommendations for college credit for military training may be viewed at http://www.acenet.edu/Content/NavigationMenu/ProgramsServices/MilitaryPrograms/index.htm. In some cases, NOVA faculty have reviewed training and made recommendations about specific NOVA courses to which the training is equivalent. Section 3: Credit by examination. Credit will be granted for selected national exams in accordance with the recommendations of the ACE College Credit Recommendation Service at http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template.cfm?Section=CCRS. In some cases, NOVA faculty have reviewed standardized examinations and made recommendations about specific NOVA courses to which the underlying education is equivalent; those recommendations are listed in this manual. In addition, NOVA has prepared exams (called ABLE exams) for selected courses to validate learning achieved through work-related experience, formal education, etc. Section 4: Credit for life experiences. Students may obtain credit for life experiences by developing portfolios through NOVA’s Prior Learning Activity for Credit Evaluation (PLACE) program. PLACE is for adults who have gained college-level learning through work, volunteer activities, participation in civic assignments, travel, independent study, and similar life experiences. Section 5: NOVA no longer gives credit for articulated secondary school programs. General Procedures The evaluation of transcripts is intended as a service to students who are pursuing academic programs at NOVA. It is not intended as a means for credentialing students or providing documentation for job promotions, etc.   To be eligible to apply for advanced standing, students must declare a major. Students must have enrolled in at least one course at NOVA before an official transcript reflecting transfer credit will be issued. An unofficial transcript may be reviewed at any time for advising purposes. Students are eligible for the advanced standing opportunities in place at the time they make a request for credit. Exceptions may be considered on a case-by-case basis. There is no limit on the number of credits that may be awarded through advanced standing, but advanced standing credits may not be used to fulfill the residency requirement for graduation. A minimum of 25% of the credit required for the associate degree and certificate must be earned at NOVA. Transfer credit may be allowed for certain courses which do not correspond directly to NOVA courses. These courses are classified as humanities, social/behavioral science, natural science or unspecified electives. The division dean responsible for the student’s curriculum will determine if and how the elective(s) may be used in the curriculum.







4



The division dean responsible for the student’s curriculum determines whether credits may be applied to the student’s curriculum. Each of the areas specified by the VCCS must be met before a student can graduate; deans cannot waive compliance with VCCS distribution requirements. All accepted advanced standing credits will be acknowledged and recorded on the student’s permanent record, with the transferring agency or other source of credit identified. No unsuccessfully attempted advanced standing applications or examination results will be recorded on the student’s permanent record. No grades, scores or grade points will be recorded on the student’s permanent record for credits earned through advanced standing procedures. The student record will show a “T” instead of a grade. Students may initiate an appeal process if they are not satisfied with the evaluation of their transfer credits. Such process must take place by the end of the next semester after the evaluation has been made. The summer term does not count in this time limit.









Evaluation Responsibilities The responsibility for effective evaluation of advanced standing credits is shared among many faculty and staff. The Advanced Standing Subcommittee of the Curriculum Committee represents these various groups and is responsible for the development of policies and the implementation of consistent college-wide procedures. Campus Level Counselors and Student Services Centers: The campus counselors, registrars and their staffs are responsible for insuring that appropriate records relating to advanced standing are received and processed. In cases where there are approved routine procedures for awarding advanced standing credit, registrars, transcript evaluators and others on the Student Services staffs are empowered to record these credits on the student’s transcript. Faculty and Advisors: Discipline faculty are asked to review all recommendations for discipline specific credit. Advisors may recommend the use of electives to meet specific discipline requirements through substitution procedures. Advisors may also recommend that elective course credit be changed to specific course credit based on supplemental course descriptions that the student has obtained from his/her previous school. Provosts, Deans of Students and Division Deans: All policies and procedures regarding advanced standing are approved by the administration of the college. Specific decisions about the qualifications of a student for graduation from a program, including the applicability of any credit awarded through advanced standing, are approved by the responsible division dean and provost. Appeals of Advanced Standing Decisions: Students who wish to request reconsideration of an advanced standing decision based on existing policy should make their request first to a faculty advisor. Appeals may be sent to the appropriate division dean and to the campus provost. Appeals are discussed with the Associate Vice President for Academic Services. Students who wish to have new or revised advanced standing policies established must submit a written request (including via email) to a counselor or faculty advisor for review by the Advanced Standing

5

Committee. Students should be told that because our advanced standing policy revision process is rigorous, this review may take several months. College Level Advanced Standing Committee: The Advanced Standing Committee hears requests for new or revised policies and procedures for advanced standing credit and forwards its recommendations to the Curriculum Committee for approval. Items approved by the Curriculum Committee are forwarded to the Administrative Council for final approval. The Advanced Standing Committee also monitors the implementation of the policies and procedures to assure consistent application throughout the college. Central Records Office: Staff at the Central Records Office (CRO) certifies students for graduation. In order to do so, they must ensure that all credits including advanced standing are awarded correctly.

6

SECTION 1—CREDITS FROM POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
General Conditions Official Transcripts Required: Only official transcripts will be evaluated. An official transcript is one that has the seal of the institution and the signature of an official of that institution. An official transcript must be received in a sealed envelope from the sending institution that has no overt sign of having been opened or otherwise disturbed. Official transcripts may be mailed directly from the transferring institution to a Student Services Center at NOVA or delivered in acceptable condition, such that the receiving Registrar has confidence that the record received is authentic. Official transcripts that are sent to faculty in the departments of the College also may be accepted. Registration Before Transcripts are Issued: The evaluation of transcripts is intended as a service to students who are pursuing academic programs at NOVA. It is not intended as a means for credentialing students or providing documentation for job promotions, etc. Students must have completed at least one course at NOVA before an official transcript reflecting advanced standing credit will be issued. Request for Evaluation of Transcript Required: Students must initiate a formal request to have transcripts from other institutions evaluated. Students should initiate the request during their first semester at the College so that the transcript will be evaluated in a timely manner. Regional Accreditation Required: Credit is transferable from colleges and universities that are accredited by SACS or another Commission on Colleges regional accrediting association, or by the Commission on Higher Education. Credit also may be transferred from institutions if the Transfer of Credit Practices of Designated Educational Institutions states that credit from the institutions “is generally accepted for courses, which are appropriate to the reporting institution’s baccalaureate programs.” Course Specific Credit: All acceptable courses will be transferred as closely to the NOVA course equivalent as possible. It is an accrediting requirement that direct course credit cannot be given for a course not offered by the college accepting transfer credit. In this case only elective credit may be given. The division dean responsible for the chosen curriculum will determine if the courses in question will apply to the curriculum and/or if substitutions may be made within the curriculum. Required Grades: Generally, only courses earning a grade of “C” (not C-) or better will be accepted for transfer credit. Courses earning a grade of “P” (for a Pass/Fail course) or, with the designation “Cr” (for credit), will be accepted for transfer if the transcript indicates that credit hours have been awarded. Sequence Courses: Sequential courses (two semesters or three quarters) in which one or more grades of “D” were earned may be transferred as a sequence at full credit if the grades for the sequence average at least a grade of “C.” Failing grades will not be accepted for averaging. Grade averaging will be weighted by the credit hour value of the courses. Totally dissimilar and unrelated courses will not be grouped together to fulfill NOVA sequential course requirements. Natural Science Courses with Separate Lab: For courses with separate lecture and laboratory grades, a “C” average or better must be earned in order for credit to be awarded. Failing grades are not accepted for averaging. Thus, if a student has received a grade of “F” in either the lecture or the laboratory, the course will not be accepted. Grade averaging will be weighted by the credit hour value of the courses.

7

Advanced Standing Awards on Transcripts: NOVA will recognize and award transfer credit for credit awarded through institutionally administered exams, portfolios, etc. and posted as course equivalent credit on official transcripts from colleges and universities that are regionally accredited in the U.S. Credit for external advanced placement such as ACE recommendations, AP, CLEP, IB, etc. will be reevaluated by NOVA. Ten Year Limit on Career-Technical Credits: Transfer credit for career-technical courses that were taken more than ten years ago and are intended to be applied to graduation in the career-technical area are not routinely accepted. Exceptions must be approved by the division dean responsible for the student’s curriculum. General Elective Credit: Transfer credit may be allowed for certain courses which do not correspond directly to NOVA courses. These courses are classified as humanities, social/behavioral science, natural science, etc., or unspecified electives. The division dean responsible for the student’s curriculum will determine if and how the elective(s) may be used in the curriculum. Physical Education: Fulfillment of the NOVA physical education requirement will be granted for appropriate transfer courses, regardless of the number of credit hours granted by the other institution. Institutions have different methods of indicating that the physical education requirement has been met. For example, another college may record a physical education course on the transcript, indicate that the student passed the course, and award no credit. In such a case, the NOVA physical education requirement has been fulfilled although no transfer credit hours will be awarded. If additional credit hours are needed for an NOVA degree, these credits may be taken in the form of an elective(s) in any discipline. English on International Transcripts: International students presenting an evaluated transcript from a nonU.S. college or university which recommends credit for college-level English composition may be awarded credit for ENG 111 English Composition I if the students qualify for placement into ENG 111 based on a NOVA placement test for English. However, students should be advised that credit earned for college-level English composition at a non-U.S. college or university may not transfer to other institutions of higher education in the U.S.

8

General Education Transfer Credit for Students with Previous Degrees Students who have graduated with an A.A., A.S., or A.A. & S. degree (in a non-career-technical field) or any baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited United States institution of higher education are considered to have met the following general education requirements as applicable to their NOVA program: 6 credits English (ENG), 3 credits Communication Studies/Theatre (CST), 3 credits humanities/fine arts, 12 credits social/behavioral science, 6 credits Math (MTH), 8 credits natural science, 1-2 credits Physical Education (PED), and 1 credit Student Development (SDV). Some NOVA programs do not include all of these general education requirements, so fewer credits will apply. Credits typically are applied as follows: NOVA Program Type
NOVA AA Degrees:

General Education Requirements Met
6 credits ENG 3 credits CST 3 credits humanities/fine arts 1 9-12 credits social/behavioral science 6 credits MTH 8 credits natural science 1 credit PED 1 credit SDV 37-40 CREDITS TOTAL 6 credits ENG 3 credits CST 3 credits humanities/fine arts 9 credits social/behavioral science 2 6 credits MTH 3 8 credits natural science 1 credit PED 1 credit SDV 37 CREDITS TOTAL 3-6 credits ENG 3 credits CST 1, 5 3-6 credits social/behavioral science 2, 3 3 credits MTH or science 3 credits humanities/fine arts 1-2 credits PED (varies by program) 1 credit SDV 17-24 CREDITS TOTAL 3-6 credits ENG and/or CST 0-3 credits social/behavioral science (if required) 0-3 credits MTH (if required) 1 credit SDV 4-13 CREDITS TOTAL
4

NOVA AS Degrees:

NOVA AAS/AAA Degrees:

NOVA CERTIFICATE:

1 2

The number of credits awarded in social/behavioral science varies according to the number required in a specific program. Students in the Allied Health, Computer Science, Engineering, IT, Mathematics, Nursing and Science programs must complete the specified math requirements. 3 Engineering, Allied Health, and Nursing students must also complete the specified science requirements. For Allied Health and Nursing programs, college transfer credits in the sciences must include courses taken 10 years prior to program entry. 4 Nursing students must meet the specified psychology requirement.

9

Evaluation of International Transcripts The College accepts international transcript credit only after the student has an official transcript sent to the College that is printed in English or has been translated into English and evaluated for course-by-course credit by a private evaluation agency. Cost for this special pre-college service is to be borne by the individual student. Once the student has completed this procedure, the appropriate campus personnel will officially award college credit in the same way as would occur for any other NOVA student. Credit for ENG 111 or higher English credit will be awarded only if the student has taken and passed NOVA’s English Placement Test, qualifying for ENG 111. The transcript must be evaluated using resource materials approved by the National Council for the Evaluation of Foreign Education. NOVA does not endorse any transcript evaluation agency nor guarantee the quality of the work performed. However, students are encouraged to request that their transcripts be evaluated by an organization listed on the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services Web site (www.naces.org).

10

SECTION 2—CREDITS EARNED IN NON-TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
Non-traditional sources of college-equivalent learning may include a combination of the following, but are not limited to these: Formal and informal work place training programs as evaluated by the American Council on Education Military training programs Office skills training courses approved by NOVA faculty

Clinical Coding Associate or Clinical Coding Specialist Students presenting a current Clinical Coding Associate (CCA) certificate or a Clinical Coding Specialist (CCS) certificate will be eligible for credit for several Health Information Management (HIM) courses which may be applied to the Clinical Data Coding career studies certificate. Except for HIM 196, all courses also may be applied to the Health Information Management AAS degree. Students must provide proof of CCA or CCS certification and receive approval by the Assistant Dean for Health Information Management based on a personal interview. The assistant dean may require the student to complete additional training before granting credit for the following courses. Course Intro. To Human Pathology Medical Terminology Onsite Training Health Data Classification Systems I (ICD-9-CM) Advanced Coding and Reimbursement Health Data Classification Systems II (CPT) Pharmacology for HIM TOTAL (Effective Spring 2008) HIM 110 HIM 111 HIM 196 HIM 250 HIM 254 HIM 255 HIM 260 Credits 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 19

11

Criminal Justice Academies Physical Education Credit and Waivers for Criminal Justice Academy Completers Students who have completed a program of study at a state academy recognized by the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services may be granted all or part of the physical education credit required for a degree program. Students should contact a Student Services Center for procedures required to initiate an evaluation of transfer credit. Fairfax County Criminal Justice Academy Effective 5/2011 for students who graduated from the FCCJA in Fall 2010 or later. Basic Law Enforcement School Course Introduction to Law Enforcement Firearms and Marksmanship Electives Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures I Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures II Principles of Criminal Investigation Advanced Criminal Investigation Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Combined School Course Introduction to Law Enforcement Firearms and Marksmanship Introduction to Corrections Electives Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures I Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures II Principles of Criminal Investigation Advanced Criminal Investigation Lifetime Fitness and Wellness West Point Leadership Course Effective Spring 2008 Course Law Enforcement Organization and Administration I Law Enforcement Organization and Administration II

ADJ 110 ADJ 127 ADJ ADJ 211 ADJ 212 ADJ 236 ADJ 237 PED 116 Total

Credits 3 3 9 3 3 3 3 2 29 Credits 3 3 3 9 3 3 3 3 2 32

ADJ 110 ADJ 127 ADJ 140 ADJ ADJ 211 ADJ 212 ADJ 236 ADJ 237 PED 116 Total

ADJ 111 ADJ 112 Total

Credits 3 3 6

To receive credit for the Basic Law Enforcement School or the Combined School, students must present a letter of verification with a seal on it from the FCCJA. To receive credit for the West Point Leadership Course, students should provide a letter from a designated Fairfax County Criminal Justice Academy administrator stating that the student passed the West Point Leadership Development Course.

12

Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy Effective July 2012, no credit may be given for completion of this academy. If the training is re-evaluated by NOVA faculty as equivalent to NOVA courses, credit may be awarded in the future. Prince William County Public Safety Training Academy Effective 5/2011 for students who graduated from the PWCPSTA in Fall 2010 or later.

ADJ 110 ADJ 127 ADJ ADJ 211 ADJ 212 ADJ 236 ADJ 237 PED 116 Total

Basic Law Enforcement School Introduction to Law Enforcement Firearms and Marksmanship Electives Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures I Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures II Principles of Criminal Investigation Advanced Criminal Investigation Lifetime Fitness and Wellness

3 3 9 3 3 3 3 2 29

ADJ 110 ADJ 127 ADJ 140 ADJ ADJ 211 ADJ 212 ADJ 236 ADJ 237 PED 116 Total

Combined School (Deputy Sheriff’s Basic Academy) Introduction to Law Enforcement Firearms and Marksmanship Introduction to Corrections Electives Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures I Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures II Principles of Criminal Investigation Advanced Criminal Investigation Lifetime Fitness and Wellness

3 3 3 9 3 3 3 3 2 32

ADJ 111 ADJ 112 Total

West Point Leadership Course Effective Spring 2010 Course Law Enforcement Organization and Administration I Law Enforcement Organization and Administration II

Credits 3 3 6

To receive credit for the Basic Law Enforcement School or the Combined School, students must present a letter of verification with a seal on it from the academy. To receive credit for the West Point Leadership Course, students should provide a letter from a designated PWCPSTA administrator stating that the student passed the West Point Leadership Development Course.

13

Virginia Criminal Justice Academies Per the statewide agreement, NOVA will grant credit for the completion of training programs certified by the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services other than those listed earlier in this manual. Graduates shall provide Form 41, Department of Criminal Justice Services, to certify successful completion. Credits are awarded as follows: Law Enforcement Officer Survey of Criminal Justice Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Elective Corrections Officer Survey of Criminal Justice Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Jailors ADJ 100 PED 116 Total Survey of Criminal Justice Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 3 1 4

ADJ 100 PED 116 ADJ Total ADJ 100 PED 116 Total

3 2 3 8 3 2 5

A VCCS-wide articulation agreement with the Academies went into effect January 1999. It lists suggested course articulation but does not prescribe a maximum number of credits. Virginia State Police Academy (State Articulation Agreement Revised August 1997) Course ADJ ADJ ADJ ADJ PED 116 Total Introductory Course Law Courses (ADJ 211-212) Investigation Course (ADJ 236 or 237) Electives Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Credits 3 6 3 3-6 2 17-20

14

Early Childhood Development Military Child and Youth Services Training Advanced standing credit will be granted to students who successfully complete the Army Child and Youth Services Training Program modules at Fort Belvoir, Fort Myer, or Quantico and present documentation showing completion of the prescribed training modules, as indicated below, to a counselor or Early Childhood faculty member. Training records will be generated by the Ft. Belvoir, Ft. Myer, or Quantico Department of Defense Child Development and Youth Services office. A copy will be included in the student file within the NOVA ECD program.
Training Modules Foundation Training + Preschool Modules Foundation Training + Infant/Toddler Module Foundation Training + School Age Module Foundation Training + Family Child Care Module Foundation Training + Preschool Modules Foundation Training + Infant/Toddler Module Foundation Training + School Age Module Foundation Training + Family Child Care Module NOVA Courses Effective February 2007 – May 2009 EDU 100 Introduction to Education, 1 cr. + EDU 160 Techniques in Observation, 3 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. EDU 100 Introduction to Education, 1 cr. + EDU 160 Techniques in Observation, 3 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. EDU 100 Introduction to Education, 1 cr. + CHD 225 Curriculum Development for School-Age Child Care, 3 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. EDU 100 Introduction to Education, 1 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. Effective June 2009 CHD 165 Observation and Participation in EC/Primary Settings, 3 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. CHD 165 Observation and Participation in EC/Primary Settings, 3 cr., + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. CHD 225 Curriculum Development for School-Age Child Care, 3 cr. + EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr. EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education, 3 cr.

Child Development Associate Advanced standing will be granted for 3 credits for CHD 120, Introduction to Early Childhood Education, for students holding a current Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Prospective students must present a valid, current CDA credential certificate to a counselor or a full-time Early Childhood Education faculty member. This credential will be verified by the Council for Professional Recognition. Effective June 2008 Fairfax County Office for Children School Readiness Certificate Students who complete the Fairfax County School Readiness Certificate program offered by the Office for Children are eligible to receive 3 credits for CHD 120 Introduction to Early Childhood Education. Students must present a Certificate of Achievement showing completion of the School Readiness Certificate to a counselor or full-time Early Childhood faculty member. Effective Summer 2009

15

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN BASIC & EMT-C CERTIFICATION (VIRGINIA), EMT-PARAMEDIC (NATIONAL)
Advanced standing credits may be awarded to NOVA students presenting current, original certification cards, for the following Emergency Medical Services (EMS) levels: EMT-Basic (6 credits), EMT-Enhanced (15 credits), EMT-Intermediate (24 credits) and Paramedic (37 credits). Certifications may be National or Virginia, as shown below. Students must be currently enrolled in NOVA and must have completed successfully at least one course prior to credits being awarded. Certifications must be kept current throughout completion of the AAS in EMS degree program. Students must hold EMTBasic certification to enter the NOVA ALS program, and kept current throughout the program. For example, an EMTIntermediate would be granted all courses listed under that heading, as well as those listed under EMT-Basic and EMTEnhanced. Additional advanced standing credit may be awarded for specialized certifications (ACLS, etc.). Please see chart below for specific course listings.
Certification EMT-Basic – National or Virginia EMT-Enhanced – Virginia NOVA Courses EMS 111 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic EMS 151 Introduction to Advanced Life Support EMS 157 ALS – Trauma Care EMS 170 ALS Internship I EMS 213 ALS Skills Development Subtotal: From EMT-B: Total: EMS 153 Basic ECG Recognition EMS 155 ALS – Medical Care EMS 172 ALS Clinical Internship II EMS 173 ALS Field Internship II Subtotal: From EMT B/E: Total: EMS 159 EMS Special Populations EMS 207 Advanced Patient Assessment EMS 211 Operations EMS 216 Paramedic Review EMS 242 ALS Clinical Internship III EMS 243 ALS Field Internship III EMS 244 ALS Clinical Internship IV EMS 245 ALS Field Internship IV Subtotal: From EMT-I: Total: NOVA Course EMS 161 Basic Trauma Life Support Credits 7 4 3 1 1 9 7 16 2 4 2 1 9 16 25 3 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 14 25 39 Credits 1 Former Course EMT 106 EMT 176 EMT 181 EMT 186 EMT 184

EMT-Intermediate – National or Virginia

EMT 220 EMT 182 EMT 187 EMT 190

EMT-Paramedic – National or Virginia

EMT 280 EMT 177 EMT 245 EMT 228 EMT188 EMT 290 EMT 282 EMT 283

Specialized Certifications Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) or International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) (Effective Jan. 2008) Provider or Instructor Pediatric Basic Trauma Life Support (PBTLS) or Pediatric Education for Prehospital Providers (PEPP) (Effective Jan. 2008) Provider or Instructor Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Provider or Instructor Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Provider or Instructor Effective Fall 2006; updated for Fall 2012

Former Course EMT 121

EMS 162 Pediatric Basic Trauma Life Support

1

EMT 123

EMS 165 Advanced Cardiac Life Support EMS 169 Pediatric Advanced Life Support

1 1

EMT 251 EMT 223

16

Fire Science Technology Virginia Department of Fire Programs and the National Board on Fire Service Professional Qualifications Students holding certification by Virginia Department of Fire Programs (VDFP) or the National Board on Fire Service Professional Qualifications (NBFSPQ) may receive credit for specific NOVA Fire Science Technology courses by presenting proof of the appropriate certification as indicated below. Requirements Completion of Firefighter I + Firefighter II + current certificates from VDFP or NBFSPQ Completion of Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Technician + current certification Completion of HAZMAT Operations + current certification with department approval Completion of Fire Inspector I +current certification from VDFP or NBFSPQ Completion of the National Fire Academy Leadership I, II and III + current certification. Effective June 2007 NOVA Course and Credit FST 100 Principles of Emergency Services, 3 cr. + 3 FST elective credits FST 112 Hazardous Materials Chemistry, 3 cr. FST 112 Hazardous Materials Chemistry, 3 cr. FST 115 Fire Prevention, 3 cr. FST 237 Emergency Service Supervision, 3 cr.

Effective July 1, 2009, the VCCS approved advanced standing credit for VDFP programs. It can be viewed at http://www.vccs.edu/FacultyStaff/Academics/ProgramandCoursePlanning/CurriculumPlanningResources/tabi d/673/Default.aspx. Note that it specifies that credits will be granted only upon completion of all other FST AAS requirements. Further, it states that not all FST courses are available at all VCCS colleges, so the “determination of which of the above courses apply to the Fire Science Technology degree program will be made by the college offering the program.” The courses that apply at NOVA are those in the chart above. Other Credit for Fire Training Some fire training organizations have had their courses evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). The Virginia Department of Fire Programs is ACE accredited. Foreign Language Credit and Waiver Students who have completed two years of foreign language in high school or whose native language is not English may: 1. Request assessment by the College faculty if the language is currently taught at NOVA. Such assessment could place a student into levels above the introductory course in the foreign language sequence. If students are granted advanced placement, additional general electives will have to be completed to meet the minimum credit requirements for the degree. 2. Take the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam if prior education is in a language covered by CLEP (see Section 3). Students who achieve a satisfactory score will be awarded credit for the foreign language that may be used toward completion of a degree. 3. Students who are proficient in a foreign language not offered by NOVA or through CLEP may request a waiver of the foreign language requirement in A.A. degrees. Proficiency is generally indicated if the student has at least the equivalent of a high school diploma from an institution where the primary language is other than English. If the foreign language requirement is waived, additional general electives must be completed to meet the minimum credit requirements for the degree. This waiver is accomplished through a substitution form generated by the student’s faculty advisor.

17

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) LPNs licensed in Virginia who are admitted to NOVA’s Nursing program and who successfully complete NUR 115 LPN Transition (3 cr.) and NUR 116 Selected Nursing Concepts (1 cr.) will be granted credit for NUR 111 Nursing I (8 cr.) NUR 115 and 116 are designed to bridge the gap between LPN training and the first semester of the Nursing program. A grade of “C” or better is required in these courses.

Marketing – Sales University Professional Selling Equivalent credit for MKT 215 Sales and Marketing Management (3 credits) will be granted to students who have successfully completed the Sales University Professional Selling course. Students must present a certificate of completion of the program, which will be accepted for seven years from completion date. (Effective Fall 2007)

Military Related Experiences Military Service Courses Credit will be granted for military service school courses and skills if the awarding of credit is recommended in the current edition of the American Council on Education publication, a Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services and approved by the division dean of the student’s chosen curriculum. The following information must be obtained: a. Full and correct title of course b. Location of training c. Length of course in weeks d. Exact dates of attendance e. Branch of Service that gave the course Students must submit an official record and initiate the request for evaluation. Active duty service members must request that a DD295 certified by the commanding officer and the education officer be mailed directly from the Education Office to NOVA. Veterans and reserve personnel must submit a certified copy of the DD214. The veteran’s advisor on each campus can certify a copy of the original. Students who entered the Army on or after January 1984 must submit an AARTS (Army ACE Registry Transcript System) transcript in lieu of a DD295 or DD214. Transcripts may be requested by fax from AARTS Operation Center, at 913-6842011 or DSN 552-2011 or by email to aarts@aarts.army.mil and use “Transcript Request” as the subject. Military service courses and skills should be equivalent to NOVA courses and will be used as the student’s program determines. Military service credit in career-technical areas, which is 10 or more years old and is to be applied toward graduation in the career-technical area, must be approved by the appropriate division dean. Students who have completed basic training, regardless of the date of military experience, may receive credit for PED 116 and a PED elective. In cases of conflict, course requirements as stated in the NOVA College Catalog precede any other requirements (such as SOCAD agreements). Military Service/Basic Training Students who have completed basic training may receive credit for PED 116. Students should contact a Student Services Center for procedures required to initiate an evaluation of transfer credit.

18

Army Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) Credit may be granted for Army primary and secondary MOS at Skill level 30-40 if current proficiency can be documented. Credit for MOS Skill Level 10 will only be granted for ratings prior to October 1991, but credit may be granted for courses leading to this skill level after October 1991. After March 1995 skill levels 30 and 40 may yield credit for management skills but not technical skills. Skill level 20 is valid only from January 1990 to February 1995. No credit is awarded for duty MOS. Community College of the Air Force Air Force personnel, both active and veteran, must submit a Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) transcript. Transcripts may be obtained from CCAF/RRR, 130 West Maxwell Blvd, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL 36112-6613. CCAF will not accept fax requests for transcripts. Marine Corps (MCE), Navy (NER) and Coast Guard (CGR) Ratings & Schools Credit may be given in accordance with ACE recommendations. Students who are active duty or Reserve Sailors/Marines or who separate/retire on or after 10/1/99 must submit a Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript (SMART). Download and complete a copy of the SMART Request Form by going to https://smart.navy.mil. If you are unable to access this site you may obtain the form from your local Navy College Office or Marine Corps Lifelong Learning Center If you cannot visit one of these offices, call the Navy College Center (NCC) toll free at 1-877-253-7122 or e-mail ncc@navy.mil. NCC is open 7 days a week 6:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. CST. Mail or fax the form to the address/fax number on the form. The Navy College Center will mail the official SMART to the college(s) you designate. You may also submit the form in person or by fax to your local Navy College Office or Marine Corps Education Center, which will order the official SMART to be mailed to NOVA. Marine Corps Correspondence Courses (MCI) Transcripts listing completed correspondence courses may be obtained from the Marine Corps Institute, 912 Charles Poor Street, SE, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20391-5680 or call toll free 1-800-MCI-USMC.

19

Office Skills Training Community Preservation and Development Corporation (CPDC) Students who completed Community Preservation and Development Corporation’s Computer Skills Employment Training course, MS Office Suite, may be eligible for college credit. Effective January 2007, students may be eligible for credit for AST 236 Specialized Software Applications (3 cr.), or BUS 226 Computer Business Applications (3 cr.), but will no longer receive credit for ITE 115 due to significant changes in its course content. To receive credit, students must present a Level I or Level II CPDC Certificate of Graduation dated January 2001 or later. Training Futures Students who completed Northern Virginia Family Services Training Futures’ MS Office Suite and Keyboarding courses and present their credentials by December 2006 were eligible for credit for ITE 115 Basic Computer Literacy and AST 101 Keyboarding. Effective January 2007, students are eligible for credit for AST 236 Specialized Software Applications (3 cr.) or BUS 226, Computer Business Applications (3 cr.), but will no longer receive credit for ITE 115 Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts due to significant changes in its course content. Students are also still eligible for credit for AST 101 Keyboarding (3 cr.). To receive credit, students must provide their graduation certificate and must have completed the courses in January 2001 or later.

Physical Education NOVA Basketball, Soccer and Volleyball Sports Teams To receive advanced standing for PED 152 Basketball, PED 150 Soccer, or PED 154 Volleyball, students will be required to ask their coach to complete a Team Member Verification form (125-108, 125-109 or 125-110, respectively) to be submitted to the Student Services Center by the coach verifying their active participation in one full season, with a minimum of 20 hours of participation in practice and game play within the past 2 years. American Red Cross Lifeguard/First Aid Certification and CPR/AED for Lifeguards To receive the advanced standing credit for PED 245 Lifeguard Training, students must have actively participated in training within the last 2 years (24 months) and must present current certification in American Red Cross Lifeguard/First Aid certification and CPR/AED for Lifeguards to the Student Services Center at their primary campus. Waiver for Active Duty Fire Fighters and Police Students who are currently employed by a fire department or police force and can document that they have completed physical fitness requirements for the job may have the two-credit physical education requirement waived. Such a waiver is at the discretion of the division dean responsible for the student’s curriculum and will require that an additional two credits of general elective be completed to meet the total number of credits required for the degree. The online Substitution Request Form must be submitted to designate which course will be used to meet the credit requirement.

20

Respiratory Therapist CRT Students who hold the certified respiratory therapist or CRT (formerly CRTT) credential of the National Board for Respiratory Care (formerly the NBRT) are granted the credit listed below. Credit is awarded only with an official document showing such certification and only after successful completion of RTH 236. Course RTH 111 Anatomy & Physiology of the Cardiopulmonary System RTH 120 Fundamental Theory for Respiratory Care RTH 121 Cardiopulmonary Science I RTH 131 Respiratory Care Theory & Procedures I RTH 135 Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures RTH 145 Pharmacology for Respiratory Care I RTH 151 Fundamental Clinical Procedures RTH 195 Topics in Integrated Sciences for Respiratory Therapy RTH 196 On-Site Training in Respiratory Care I RTH 296 On-Site Training in Respiratory Care II Total Credits (Updated 2/27/09) Credits 3 2 3 4 2 1 3 2 3 2 25

RRT Students who hold the RRT credential are eligible to receive credit for the RTH courses listed below upon presentation of an official document showing the certification and after successful completion of one NOVA RTH course. Course Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Home Care and Health Promotion Pulmonary Science II Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Procedures Integrated Respiratory Therapy Skills II Critical Care Monitoring Advanced Clinical Care Procedures III Advanced Critical Care Procedures IV Topics in Advanced Cardiac Life Support Credits 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 21

RTH 217 RTH 222 RTH 225 RTH 227 RTH 236 RTH 253 RTH 254 RTH 295 Total Credits (Updated 2/27/09)

Neonatal/Pediatric Specialist Students who hold the Neonatal/Pediatric Specialist designation may be awarded credit for either, but not both, RTH 225 Neonatal & Pediatric Respiratory Procedures or RTH 226 Theory of Neonatal & Pediatric Respiratory Care. Credit is to be awarded only with an official document showing such certification and only after successful completion of an upper level RTH course.

21

SECTION 3—CREDIT BY EXAM
This section of the manual lists exams for which NOVA has determined specific equivalents. Some exams may no longer be given, but credit may be applied for up to 20 years. Because exams must be studied carefully before a NOVA equivalent can be determined, some relatively new exams may not be listed. In that case, NOVA grants credit as recommended by ACE. Abitur Advanced standing will be granted to students successfully completing the Abitur, Certificate of University Maturity (Zeugnis Der Allgemeinen Hochschulreife). Test scores must be presented directly to a Student Services Center at NOVA. See: http://admissions.gmu.edu/exams/examabitur.asp Abitur Certificate of General University Maturity (Zeugnis Der Allgemeinen Hochschulreife) Subject Score NOVA Course Credits 8 8 0 3 6 3 8 3 Biology 1-3 BIO 101+102 General Biology I-II Chemistry 1-3 CHM 111+112 College Chemistry I-II English 1-3 No credit—this is English for non-native speakers French 1-3 FRE 211 Inter. French Conversation I German 1-3 GER 241 Inter. German Composition I +GER elective History 1-3 HIS elective Physics 1-3 PHY 101+102 Intro. To Physics Social 1-3 HIS 101 History of Western Civilization I Studies Approved effective Spring 2006.

Advanced Placement Examination Program (AP) The College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) administers advanced placement examinations that enable high school students to complete college-level courses, to demonstrate college-level achievement through examinations, and to receive college course credit, if qualified, when they enter an institution of higher education. The CEEB examinations are offered in the high schools by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). The AP examination scores are reported as follows: Extremely well qualified Well qualified Qualified Possibly qualified No recommendation 5 4 3 (Needed for NOVA credit) 2 1

22

Students must have official AP score reports forwarded from ETS to a Student Services Center for inclusion in the permanent record. NOVA students intending to transfer should note that most senior institutions require a minimum score of 4. Your AP credits will be reevaluated by each four-year institution. Specific college course credits will be granted for a minimum score of 3 on the AP examinations according to the following listing: NOVA Course Equivalent Credit Art History ART 101-102 6 Art, Studio (determined by portfolio submitted to campus Art Department) Biology BIO 101-102 8 Chemistry CHM 111-112 8 Chinese Language and Culture CHI 201-202 8 Computer Science A CSC 201 4 Computer Science AB CSC 201-202 8 Economics, Macro ECO 201 3 Economics, Micro ECO 202 3 English Language & Composition ENG 111-112 6 English Literature & Composition ENG 111-112 6 Environmental Science ENV 100 (prior to Fall 2009) 3 ENV 121-122 (effective Fall 2009) 8 French Language FRE 201-202 6 German Language GER 201-202 6 Geography, Human GEO 210 3 Government & Politics/Comparative PLS 120 3 Government & Politics/U.S. PLS 135, PLS 211 6 History, U.S. HIS 121-122 6 History, European HIS 101-102 6 History, World HIS 111-112 6 Italian Language and Culture ITA 201-202 6 Japanese Language and Culture JPN 201-202 8 Latin/Literature or Virgil LAT 201-202 6 Mathematics (Calculus AB) MTH 173 5 Mathematics (Calculus BC) MTH 173-174 10 Music Theory MUS 111-112 8 Physics B PHY 201-202 8 Psychology PSY 201-202 6 Russian Language and Culture RUS 201-202 6 Spanish Language SPA 201-202 6 Spanish Literature SPA 233 (3 cr) + SPA elective (3 cr) or 6 SPA 271-272 Statistics MTH 241 3 AP Examination

23

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration ARI – GAMA (Air Conditioning & Refrigeration): HVAC Apprenticeship to Degree Students who have completed their apprenticeship with a score of 75% correct or better and pass two of the ARI- GAMA competency exams with a grade of 70% or better may receive credit for all Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (AIR) courses required for the Air Conditioning & Refrigeration degree. NOVA students may receive full or partial credit by submitting the following documentation: a copy of the certificate showing completion of the apprenticeship program, a copy of the GAMA exam results scoring 70% or higher, or a copy of their Master HVAC card. ICE/ARI EPA Exams (Virginia Master Mechanical License) Students who present evidence that they have passed all parts of the Industry Competency Exams and the ARI EPA Certification Exams may be granted credit for all AIR courses in the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration A.A.S. degree, certificate, and career studies certificate programs. These individuals will be licensed Virginia Master Mechanical Tradesmen.

Assessment by Local Exam (ABLE) Using exams prepared by NOVA faculty, Assessment by Local Exam (ABLE) allows students to receive credit for courses by demonstrating they have acquired the competencies through prior education or other experiences. Students must contact the department offering the exam to determine if they are qualified to take the exam; they may have to meet certain background requirements in order to qualify. There is no charge for ABLE exams or for having credit recorded on the student’s permanent record. Credits earned through ABLE exams do not count toward the College residency requirement and may or may not transfer to other institutions of higher education. ABLE exams are listed in the chart below. Course Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Controls Air Conditioning and Refrigeration I Elective Introduction to Medical Technology Introduction to Horticulture Human Biology College Success Skills (Passing score requires 76% correct) Credits 3cr. 4 cr. 3 cr. 1 cr. 3 cr. 4 cr. 1 cr.

AIR 111 AIR 121 DRF HLT 141 HRT 100 NAS 150 SDV 100

24

Cambridge, University of, Advanced Level Examinations Advanced standing will be granted to students successfully completing the University of Cambridge Advanced Level Examinations General Certificate of Education. Test scores must be presented directly to a Student Services Center at NOVA. General Certificate of Education University of Cambridge Advanced Level Examinations Subject Chemistry A B Grade Course Credits 8 4 6 6 6 8 5 3 6 CHM 111+112 College Chemistry I-II CHM 111 College Chemistry I CST 130 Intro to the Theatre + Drama C* or better CST elective ECO 201+202 Principles of Macroeconomics + Economics C or better Microeconomics English C or better ENG 111 + 112 College Composition I-II MTH 163 Precalculus I + Mathematics C or better MTH 173 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I Physics C or better PHY 231 Gen. Univ. Physics I Psychology C or better PSY 201 Intro. To Psychology PHI 101 Intro. To Philosophy I+ Religious Studies C or better PHI 220 Ethics *A grade of “C” at Cambridge is equivalent to a grade of “B” in the U.S. Approved effective Spring 2006.

Certified Manager (CM) The Certified Manager (CM) Program is sponsored by the Institute of Certified Professional Managers and founded by the National Management Association. The Institute is a business center of the College of Business at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Passing of the certified exam and presentation of the Certified Manager certificate provided by the Institute of Certified Professional Managers will substitute for BUS 200, Principles of Management, for 3 credits. Advanced Standing for CM certification is effective Spring 2006 for students with CM certification dated January 2006 or later.

25

Certified Professional Legal Secretary (PLS) Upon successful completion of all parts of the PLS exam and with the authorization of a faculty advisor, students may be awarded up to 27 credits from among the following courses: Course Principles of Accounting I (Legal Office Procedures) (Shorthand I) Office Administration I College Composition Technical Writing Intro. To Law & the Legal Assistant Legal Research Introduction to Psychology I or PSY 126 Psychology for Business/Industry Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

ACC 211 AST Elective AST Elective AST 243 ENG 111 ENG 115 LGL 110 LGL 125 PSY 201

For information:

National Association of Legal Secretaries Resource Center; 8159 East 41st St.; Tulsa, OK 74145 Telephone: 918-582-5188; Fax: 918-582-5907; Email: Info@nals.org

Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Upon successful completion of all parts of the CPS exam and with the authorization of a faculty advisor, students in programs other than Administrative Support Technology (AST) may be awarded credit for the following courses: Course Principles of Accounting I* Keyboarding Microcomputer Applications Office Administration I* Principles of Management Human Resource Management* Business Law I* Principles of Economics I Writing for Business Introduction to Information Systems Human Relations Credits 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

ACC 211 AST 117 AST 232 AST 243 BUS 200 BUS 205 BUS 241 ECO 201 ENG 116 ITE 100 PSY 120

*Students placed in the AST specialization of the Business Management AAS degree may receive credit for these courses and ECO 120 but they must complete all other courses required for the degree before these credits are posted on the transcript. This recommendation was made by the AST VCCS Peer Group and approved by the VCCS Advisory Committee of the Deans and Provosts. For Information: Intl. Assoc. of Admin. Professionals 10502 Northwest Ambassador Drive; P.O. Box 20404; Kansas City, MO 64195-0404 Telephone: 816-891-6600

26

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) CLEP is a program of credit by examination that offers students the opportunity to earn college credit for knowledge acquired outside the conventional college classroom. College-level competency may have been acquired through personal reading, formal study, job experience, non-credit course work, television taped courses, correspondence courses, military training, adult courses, and advanced studies in high school. NOVA grants credit for a specified level of performance on CLEP General Examinations in five General Education areas and Subject Examinations in specific course disciplines. The examinations all require an American Council on Education recommended minimum score of 50 for credit to be awarded, unless a higher score is specified in the following chart. Students should view the CLEP website at http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/clep/about.html to be sure the test they want to take is still offered. On the following page is a list of the CLEP examinations and the course equivalents for which NOVA grants credit. For further information, contact a Student Services Center at one of the campuses, or the Educational Testing Service, Institutional Services Department, P.O. Box 1822, Princeton, NJ 08541, 609-921-9000. Students may take CLEP exams through the Alexandria Campus, Workforce Development and Continuing Education Office or at Fort Belvoir or Quantico Marine Corps Base. Each exam lasts 90 minutes. For information on Alexandria exam schedules and cost, please call 703-845-6280 or visit the following website: http://www.nvcc.edu/wdce/alexandria/specialized/clep.asp.

27

CLEP Exams and NOVA Equivalents General Examinations College Composition Humanities Mathematics, College Social Sciences and History Natural Sciences Subject Examinations Accounting, Financial Accounting, Introduction (no longer offered) Algebra, College American Government American History I (no longer offered) American History II (no longer offered) American Literature Biology Business Law, Introductory Calculus Chemistry College Composition Modular Exam Educational Psychology, Introductory English Literature French Language (cutoff score of 50) (cutoff score of 62) German Language (cutoff score of 50) (cutoff score of 63) History of the US I: Early Colonialism to 1877 History of the US II: 1865 to Present Human Growth & Development Information Systems & Computer Applications Management, Principles of Marketing, Principles of Macroeconomics, Principles of Microeconomics, Principles of Precalculus Psychology, Introductory Sociology, Introductory Spanish Language (cutoff score of 50) (cutoff score of 66) Trigonometry (no longer given) Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648 Western Civilization II: 1648 to Present Course ENG 111 HUM 201-202 MTH 151-152 Social/Behavioral Science Electives Natural Science Electives (revised effective Fall 2009 because there is no lab)

Credit 3 6 6 6

Course ACC 211 ACC 211-212 MTH 163 PLS 211 HIS 121 HIS 122 ENG 241-242 BIO 101-102 BUS 241 MTH 173 CHM 111-112 PSY 245 ENG 243-244 FRE 101-102 FRE 201-202 GER 101-102 GER 201-202 HIS 121 HIS 122 PSY 231 ITE 100 BUS 200 MKT 201 ECO 201 ECO 202 MTH 166 PSY 201 SOC 201 SPA 101-102 SPA 201-202 MTH elective HIS 101 HIS 102

6 Credit 3 6 3 3 3 3 6 8 3 5 8 0 3 6 10 6 10 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 10 6 3 3 3

28

DSST Program (formerly known as DANTES) The DSST Program is offered by Prometric, which began updating exams in 2008. NOVA awards specific course credit for acceptable scores, as recommended by the American Council on Education. Several types of examinations are reported: end-of-course examinations for correspondence, extension courses from regionally accredited colleges and universities, College-Level Tests of General Educational Development given prior to 1960, and General Examination of the College-Level Examination Program. Also, college course credit may be granted for tests administered by the United States Armed Forces Institutes (USAFI) prior to June 1, 1974 for scores at the 40th percentile and above. Scores at the 20th percentile and above are accepted for DANTES exams taken prior to September 1981. A complete listing of current and prior tests and recommended scores may be found at: GetCollegeCredit.com. Exams are administered at Ft. Belvoir and Quantico Marine Corps Base. The chart below shows new minimum scores effective for exams taken in 2008 and later in bold type. Exam Art of the Western World Astronomy Basic Automotive Service (no longer offered) Beginning Italian I (no longer offered) Business Ethics & Society Business Law II Business Mathematics Criminal Justice Electric Circuits (no longer offered) Environment & Humanity: Race to Save the Planet Ethics in America Foundations of Education Fundamentals of College Algebra Fundamentals of Counseling General Anthropology Here’s to Your Health A History of the Vietnam War Human/Cultural Geography Human Resource Management Introduction to Business Introduction to Computing Introduction to Law Enforcement (replaces Survey of Criminal Justice ) Introduction to the Modern Middle East Introduction to World Religions Lifespan Developmental Psychology Management Information Systems Money & Banking Organizational Behavior Personal Finance Physical Geology Principles of Electronic Communications Systems (no longer offered ) Principles of Finance Min Score 48 48 46 46 52 45 49/400 46 46 46/400 46 46/400 47 47 48/400 49 48 48 46 49/400 45 44 49/400 46 45/400 48 48 46/400 46 47 46 Course ART Elective NAS Elective AUT 100 ITA 101 BUS 242 BUS 125 ADJ 100 ETR Elective ENV 100 PHI Elective EDU Elective MTH Elective HMS Elective SOC 211 HLT Elective HIS 277 GEO 210 BUS 205 BUS 100 ITE 100 ADJ 110 (100 for old test) HIS 252 REL 231 PSY 231 IT Elective ECO Elective BUS 201 (rev 9/96) FIN 107 GOL Elective ETR Elective FIN Elective Credits 3 3 2 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

29

Exam Principles of Financial Accounting Principles of Physical Science I Principles of Public Speaking Principles of Statistics Principles of Supervision Rise & Fall of the Soviet Empire Substance Abuse (replaces Drug and Alcohol Abuse) Technical Writing The Civil War and Reconstruction Western Europe Since 1945 (replaces Contemporary Western Europe )

Min Score 49 47 47 48/400 46 45 49/400 46 47 48

Course ACC 211 PHY Elective CST 100 MTH 241 BUS 111 HIS Elective HMS 251 ENG 115 HIS 269 HIS Elective

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Excelsior College Examinations (formerly PEP) NOVA recognizes the Excelsior College Examinations, formerly known as ACT Proficiency Exam Program (PEP). Credit is granted in accordance with the recommendations of the American Council on Education National Guide at http://www.acenet.edu/nationalguide/.

Institute for Certification of Computer Professionals (ICCP) Students who provide an ACE transcript showing that they successfully completed the CDP or ACP exams may request credit for: Certified Data Processor Exam (CDP) Course Introduction to Information Systems Software Design 100-level ITD, ITE, ITN, ITP Associate Computer Professional Exam (ACP) Course Introduction to Information Systems Software Design 100-level ITD, ITE, ITN, ITP

ITE 100 ITP 100 IT electives

Credits 3 3 6* Credits 3 3 9*

ITE 100 ITP 100 IT electives

*No more than 9 credits of IT electives may be granted if both exams have been passed. The ACP and CDP exams were effective 5/90 through 12/93. Beginning 1/94, the ICCP exams became computer based. The tests are now called Associate Computing Professional (still ACP) and Certified Computing Professional (CCP). For more information: ICCP, 2400 East Devon Avenue, Suite 281, Des Plains, IL 60018 Telephone: 847-299-4227 Website: www.iccp.org

30

International Baccalaureate (IB) Students completing the Higher Level exams for International Baccalaureate will be granted advanced standing credit for these exams if a score of 5 or above is achieved. Prior to Spring 2012, a score of 4 was also accepted, but VCCS policy now requires a score of 5 or higher. IB Exam Biology Chemistry Computing Studies English A1 English B French A1 or B Geography German A1 or B History History of the Americas Mathematics Philosophy Physics Psychology Social Anthropology Spanish A1 or B Visual Arts Score of 5 BIO 101, 4 cr CHM 111, 4 cr CSC 201, 4 cr ENG 111, 3 cr ENG 111, 3 cr (101-102) no cr GEO 220, 3 cr (101-102) no cr HIS 101, 3 cr (only if 5,6 or 7) MTH 173, 5 cr PHI 101, 3 cr PHY 201, 4 cr PSY 201, 3 cr SOC 211, 3 cr (101-102) no cr ART 131, 3 cr Score of 6 &7 BIO 101-102, 8 cr CHM 111-112, 8 cr CSC 201-202, 8 cr ENG 111-112, 6 cr ENG 111, 3 cr FRE 201-202, 6 cr GEO 220 + GEO elect., 6 cr GER 201-202, 6 cr HIS 101, 112, 6 cr HIS elective, 6 cr MTH 173-174, 10 cr PHI 101-102, 6 cr PHY 201-202, 8 cr PSY 201-202, 6 cr SOC 211-212, 6 cr SPA 201-202, 6 cr ART 131-132, 6 cr

Students must have an official report of exam scores sent from the International Baccalaureate Organization to a Student Services Center at NOVA. Effective Spring 2009, the Administrative Council approved the concept of granting credit for Standard Level IB Courses. Specific equivalencies have not been determined. No credit is granted yet for Standard Level IB courses at NOVA. For information: International Baccalaureate North America 475 Riverside Drive, Suite 240 New York, NY 10115 Telephone: 212-696-4464; Fax: 212-889-9242; Email: iba@ibo.org

31

Medical/Clinical Laboratory Technician Certification Updated 6/20/2011 Students certified as a Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) – Board of Certification (BOC) will be granted the credit listed below toward the Medical Laboratory Technology AAS degree upon presentation of a valid document showing such certification.

Course MDL 101 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Techniques MDL 196 On-Site Training – Phlebotomy * see below; select advanced standing MDL 127 Hematology MDL 215 Immunology MDL 216 Blood Banking/Immunohematology MDL 243 Introduction to Clinical Molecular Diagnostics MDL 251 Clinical Microbiology I MDL 252 Clinical Microbiology II MDL 261 Clinical Chemistry and Instrumentation I MDL 266 Clinical Chemistry Techniques MDL 276 Clinical Hematology Techniques MDL 277 Clinical Immunohematology /Immunology Techniques MDL 278 Clinical Microbiology Techniques II MDL 281 Clinical Correlations Total

Credits 3 1 3 2 4 2 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 1 41

PHLEBOTOMY CERTIFICATION and/or valid documentation of extensive experience
Updated 6/20/2011 Students certified as a Phlebotomy Technician by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) – Board of Certification (BOC) and/or who have extensive current experience in all aspects of phlebotomy under the direction of a CAP accredited full service laboratory will be granted the credit listed below upon presentation of valid documentation showing such certification and/or experience. Course MDL 106 Clinical Phlebotomy MDL 196 On Site Training Credits 4 1 Applicable to Phlebotomy Career Studies Certificate Medical Laboratory Technology AAS Degree

32

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence Automotive Technician Certification Tests (ASE) Credit may be granted for the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Automotive Technician Certification Tests. For each course for which credit is to be granted, Auto and Auto Body alike, written employer verification of two years’ full-time technician work experience, including specific information on the ASE areas and percentage of time the technician worked in each area, is required. This verification is to be provided on company stationery over the signature and title of his/her supervisor. The following credits are awarded for ASE exams: ASE Exam A1 Engine Repair A2 Automatic Transmission Trans Axle A3 Manual Drive Train and Axle A4 Suspension and Steering A5 Brakes A6 Electrical Systems A7 Heating & Air Conditioning A8 Engine Performance TOTAL L1 Advanced Engine Performance NOVA Course AUT 112 Automotive Engines II AUT 142 Auto Power Trains II AUT 141 Auto Power Trains I AUT 266 Auto Alignment, Suspension, and Steering AUT 265 Automotive Braking Systems AUT 241 Automotive Electricity I AUT 236 Automotive Climate Control AUT 111 Automotive Engines I Credit 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4

AUT 121 or AUT 122 Automotive Fuel Systems I or II OR AUT 215 Emissions Systems Diagnosis & Repair + AUT 226 Advanced ASM Emissions Diagnostics AUB 118Automotive Paint Preparation AUB 106 Basic Sheet Metal Operations AUB 116 Auto Body Repair

B2 Painting & Refinishing B3 Non-Structural Analysis B4 Structural Analysis & Damage Repair TOTAL More information from ASE:

4 4 4 12

ASE 101 Blue Seal Drive, S.E. Suite 101 Leesburg, VA 20175 Telephone: 1-877-ASE-Tech (273-8324); Local: 703-699-6600 www.ase.com Alexandria Campus Telephone: 703-845-6230 or 703-845-6190 Manassas Campus Telephone: 703-257-6676 or 703-257-6679

Or call the NOVA Automotive program:

33

SAT II Advanced standing will be granted to students for successful completion of the listed SAT II Subject Exams. Test scores must be presented directly to a Student Services Center at NOVA. SAT II Subject Exams Subject Exam American History French German Latin Russian Spanish Effective Spring 2006. Score ≥530 ≥560 ≥620 ≥560 ≥620 ≥560 ≥620 ≥560 ≥620 ≥560 ≥620 HIS elective FRE 201 Intermediate French I FRE 201+202 Intermediate French I-II GER 201 Intermediate German I GER 201+202 Intermediate German I-II LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I LAT 201+202 Intermediate Latin I-II RUS 201 Intermediate Russian I RUS 201+202 Intermediate Russian I-II SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I SPA 201+202 Intermediate Spanish I-II NOVA Course Credits 3 3 6 3 6 3 6 3 6 3 6

34

SECTION 4—CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCES - PLACE
PLACE (Prior Learning Activity for Credit Evaluation) allows students to develop portfolios based on their experiences to demonstrate learning equivalent to one or more college courses. If accepted by the faculty, the student is then awarded credit for the course or courses. PLACE is for adults who have gained college-level learning through work, volunteer activities, participation in civic and community assignments, travel, independent study, and similar “life experiences.” Requirements and Procedures: 1. SDV 298 PLACE Seminar A three-credit portfolio development course (SDV 298) is required of all students seeking credit for experiential learning. The purpose of the portfolio course is to direct students in the preparation of a portfolio for each course for which the student wishes credit. Students are provided with a course content summary for each course for which they wish to get credit. Each portfolio consists of six parts: a. a life history (mainly work history) paper to introduce the student to the faculty evaluator, including a summary of his or her many lifetime accomplishments; b. a chronological record, which is a short synopsis of year-by-year major happenings in the student’s adult life; c. a goals paper, which helps the student focus and shows the faculty evaluator where the student plans to go in the short term and long term future; d. a narrative of competencies which describes where learning took place and a very detailed description of that learning based on the course content summary; e. a copy of the course content summary; and f. documentation of each statement made of major accomplishments and learning experiences (job descriptions, transcripts, letters of verification, performance evaluations, tax statements, pictures, audio tapes, video tapes, samples of work produced, computer programs written, etc.) 2. Students must register and pay for each course to be evaluated before the portfolio will be evaluated. 3. The division deans assign each portfolio to an appropriate faculty member. 4. Credit is awarded based upon the recommendation of the faculty member. If credit is recommended, the student will receive a “P” grade for the course. If credit is denied, a “W” grade will be awarded. 5. Students may be awarded up to 15 credits through PLACE, plus the three-credit SDV 298, toward an associate degree. Students may receive up to 10 credits toward certificates and career studies programs through PLACE. In special cases, students may receive more credits through PLACE; to do so they must submit a detailed letter of justification. 6. Credit earned through PLACE may not be used to meet the residency requirement for graduation, but the 3 credits from SDV 298 do count toward residency. The PLACE program is offered at the Alexandria campus and the Extended Learning Institute. For additional information call the Student Service Center at either of these locations.

35

SECTION 5—CREDIT FOR ARTICULATED HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
Per VCCS policy, NOVA no longer offers articulated credit for high school courses.

36

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Changing Our Lives Atal Neupane Strayer University Fundamentals of Writing Assignment 2.1: Changing Our Lives Draft August 06, 2012 Dr. Ras Tsidi Acolatse Changing Our Lives I changed my life in so many ways, but the most important thing that I have changed was my education. I almost do not go back to school around three years. I was too busy on working that I totally forgot to continue my education. I decided to go back to school to further my education by attending Strayer University because my goal is to become a software programmer. At Strayer University, they have BS in Information Systems and Technology and have MOAC labs where I can work live Microsoft system using cloud technology. So, I preferred continue my education at this very convenient Strayer University. I know that getting to class is half the battle, especially for me because I work full time. Strayer University is the one that offers many options so working students like me can fit continuing education in a busy life. Even in my busy schedule, I can take classes at one of the conveniently located campus or combine online learning with campus classes, whenever, wherever, and however that works best. They scheduled the classes during evening and weekend hours. They are strategically located to be easily accessible within some city and some in the suburbs too. Almost every student in Strayer University works so, I found it to become more comfortable with classmate. In today’s business world, a......

Words: 408 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Assignment Title: Changing Our Lives Name: Professors Name: Course Title: Eng090 Date: 4/22/2012 Changing Our Lives At this time in my life, after thinking long and hard about what I’m doing and where I’m heading, I came to the conclusion that going to college would be the best thing to do for myself and my future. I was living on a small island in Greece playing soccer for a professional team. I loved playing soccer because it was fun and it made me happy. While I was playing in a game I got seriously injured to my knee and needed surgery. After my knee surgery I wasn’t able to play the same way and after much thought I decided to stop playing soccer. A friend’s friend offered me a job as a waiter in one of the hotels on the island. I didn’t like working as a waiter and I didn’t see myself doing it for the rest of my life. My salary was not enough to live on, especially for what I had to go through with customers and other staff on a daily basis. Working as a waiter wasn’t for me. Living on a small island with tourism as the biggest source of income providing just a few months out of the year as a time where you can find employment was difficult. For the rest of the year, work was hard to find and so I spent the rest ......

Words: 346 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Changing Our Lives Flora Thomas Professor Renee Pistone Eng. 090 Fundamentals of Writing 05/30/2016 “Changing our lives” My main reason for returning to college is to change my life financially, emotionally and to advance in my career in the healthcare field. I have been in the healthcare field for over 20 yrs. I have endured many mediocre jobs and salaries,while trying to advance in my career. I have had so many obstacles put before me. But by the grace of god I found Strayer University. I have a long struggle ahead of me but, in the end the success will not only change my life but others as well. My kids helped me a lot in this decision, they also made sure I applied for financial aide, but I still had to borrow for other funds. Moreover, emotionally I was ready to advance in my career, but I still needed a degree. I tried other schools, but they were very expensive and they were very skeptical about transferring my credits. Strayer put me on the right path and I just feel my emotional turmoil is over. They took the time to listen to my needs and reassured me that I was in the right place. I have a good feeling about my future, and it’s all because God has pointed me in the right direction. I feel that everything is looking up right now. I am moving forward with the best intention. My life is headed in the right direction. I am taking my journey one step at a time; My studies are coming along just fine. Eventhough I have a full-time job. I......

Words: 341 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Assignment #4: “Changing Our Lives” Body Paragraph’s Tyrondia Adams Eng 090- Writing Fundamentals Professor Clark November 14, 2015 [BODY PARAGRAPH 1] To start, providing for family is very important to me. I’m currently unemployed at the moment, I receive child warfare every month on the 1st. My child father works and attends Vatterott College. However, not having a job is a big problem in my life right. It’s hard taking care of my son without a job. I don’t want my child’s father being the only one who buys our child things. I want to be able to help him, or pick up the slack. I also, want to help with the bills, putting food on the table, and clothes on our back. I want to return the favor to my child father I want to take care of him like he have been taking care of me. I want for us both to be financially stable. We both should be able to make ends meet. [BODY PARAGRAPH 2] Furthermore, my son is another reason why I wanted to attend college at this juncture in my life. I want to be the one who sets examples for him. My son is literally my life, my everything, he’s my world and I don’t want him to want for anything. I want him to understand that school is the only way for him to be successful legally. I want to be his role model, but in order for him to look up to me, I have to continue to attend school, stay on task, and stay focus. Specifically, I have to be dedicated so that he will be dedicated. When he grow up I don’t want him thinking that the streets,...

Words: 526 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...KRISTINE TRESSLER ENG090 April 22, 2013...

Words: 317 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Running head: CHANGING OUR LIVES “Changing Our Lives” Strayer University ENG 090- Fundamental Writing November 13, 2013 CHANGING OUR LIVES A Meaningful Journey Making this decision to attend college to obtain a degree was a battle of thoughts in my mind. The question of being forty-two years of age pondering if I was too old to fulfill this passion, thinking time has passed me by. I feared starting something that I would not complete, just like all the other projects or goals that are still parked on the sideline. The people and examples that I heedfully looked up to were on shaky grounds until one day, I had a breakthrough. When my husband and I moved into our new home I meet my neighbor who encouraged me and is a candidate of a life with a degree. The timing was right, because what I feared in the past, I was now ready to push forward for a future, and enrolling in Strayer University is the best decision I ever made in life. Secondly, the world today dictates strengthens and weaknesses, either you are going to strive for the best or settle for less. The key to my smile is the work I am putting in to build a financially stable foundation. I have worked many jobs, sometimes two, and am in hopes of not being classified as living from payday to payday. The trend of this edgy living is scary, what if something happens? I don’t have any emergency funds to fall back on, what do I do? To be comfortable is to be wise, education and...

Words: 412 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Assignment #4: “Changing Our Lives” Introduction, Conclusion, and Title (Student Name) ENG 090- Writing Fundamentals (Professor Name) (Correct date) April 10, 2013 Sample Student Essay -- Introduction, Conclusion, and Title Believing in Myself: Forging a Path to College [TITLE] [INTRODUCTION] Picture this: a girl from a small town in Michigan sits at the kitchen table and tries to work on her spelling homework. [BEGINNING]Her brothers and sisters are running around, and her mom is trying to cook dinner. Her dad moved to another city, and she wonders if she will even make it through high school with all these distractions. That girl was me. Thankfully, I did make it through high school, but I put off college for 20 years![INTRODUCING THE SUBJECT] I have now chosen to go to college at this juncture in my life because of financial, personal, and emotional reasons. [THESIS STATEMENT] [CONCLUSION] To sum up, I decided to enroll at Strayer University for financial, personal, and emotional reasons. [CONCLUSION TOPIC SENTENCE, WHICH RESTATES THE THESIS OF THE ESSAY.] I think these are valid and strong reasons, and they keep me going every day. The thought of being my own boss, earning a degree, and believing in my ability to learn (despite my dyslexia) is so exciting. [SUPPORTING SENTENCES] Therefore, I can become the person I want to be. [SUPPORTING SENTENCES] Lastly, I plan to revise this essay and save it so that I can print it out on my......

Words: 254 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...: “Changing Our Lives” ENG 090- Writing Fundamentals March 11, 2015 In life we have a purpose that sometimes seems so hard to figure out. Have you ever questioned how life could be different for you and your family if you had made different choices? Well, I have. I have been bless with two beautiful children who look up to me. I think attending college is the right decision, so they can be proud to walk in my footsteps. I am now ready to attend college again to be a role model for my children, to gain personal satisfaction, and to establish a stable career. Being a role model to my children is very important to me. I want to instill in them things the world will not teach them. I want to share positive values with my children. I would like for my children to understand the importance of self-respect and self-esteem. In life you have to treat people how you want to be treated, that’s why I carry myself in a respectful way. I model traits such as showing respect, being honest, kind, reliable, having tolerance and doing without expecting a reward. I share success and failures stories with my children so that they will know its okay to fall short of a goal. Falling short does not mean it is the end. Above all, the goals I set, the way I carry myself and the decision I make convey an important message to my children: Change is not easy and mistakes are opportunities for learning. Lastly, I want my children to never give up because I never gave up. The second reason I...

Words: 755 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Assignment #7: “Changing Our Lives” Final Essay Samantha Howard ENG 090- Writing Fundamentals Professor Amanda Crane December 12, 2014 Better Late, Than Never! I have dreamed of the day I would earn my college degree since I was in the 1st grade. Though my career choice varied with age, my desire to be successful has remained constant. Unfortunately, I allowed seven long years to pass by before continuing my education. My fear of failing to choose the best career path and right school for me are a couple of reasons I procrastinated for so long. Ultimately, I made the decision to go to college at this point in my life to finally obtain career satisfaction, financial security, and self-fulfillment. Firstly, I envision myself employed with a successful business firm with aspirations of starting my own business when I graduate from college. I have always wanted to open an upscale salon and spa in a big city, such as New York City. I believe that having my own business will help me enjoy my job, take control of all aspects of the company, and gain personal growth. Many times, it can be difficult to co-exist alongside some co-workers and managers. I have often found myself, “faking it, until I make it.” Most jobs are tolerable, but I think they should, also, be enjoyable. Taking the entrepreneur route will, essentially, give my profession more meaning to me. Next, it is important to me to finish my college education and earn my degree, in order to provide a stable......

Words: 511 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives

...Assignment 1: Ethical Issues in Information Systems Strayer University Professor April Hudson CIS109-Intro Mgt Info Systems   Privacy is one of the major ethical issues in today’s digital society. The collection of data by various electronic means, has pretty much ensured the age of total privacy is coming to an end. The ethical use of private information walks a thin line with the way information is given and received. Private information can be handle very delicately by a doctor’s office, but with the wrong click of the mouse. You can basically hand over your life to someone and have your life stolen. I personally chose social media as a way to stay in contact with most of my family and friends. Not until 2007 did I realize how social media worked and how privacy could become an issue. Posting the wrong picture or allowing someone to post a not so pleasing one of you could cause and ethical issue in the work place years later. Trying to get a job these days required you handing over your Facebook password and allowing people to form an opinion of you from what you do or say away from the workplace. The ethical issue behind this demand of you private life only start here. That’s why I learned to interact with social media very carefully. Watching what I post, and being aware of what other people post of myself. Protecting you privacy can be pretty easy. Being aware of what you say around a group of people is very important. For example, you’re at work and...

Words: 726 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Changing Our Lives

...The reason I decided to go back to college at this time in my life is because I want more. I want a career, not just another job. I want to be a role model for my children, to be someone that they can look up too. I want my children to see me work hard, and see the determination that I have, so that they too will do the same. The main reason is to be that example to my children , and by going back to school, my children will see that anything is possible and that they need to work hard and to stay focused. But another reason is I want a career, a career will provide much more for myself and my family. At this time, finances are a struggle. Within the last two years, I have had 9 surgeries, and most of those two years I have been unable to work, and provide more for my children. Another reason is I want to feel like I have achieved something in my life. At the age of 17 I dropped out of high school, due to pregnancy. Finally in 2003 I went and took and passed my GED. Even though I passed, I don’t feel as though I have achieved anything. Years passed and I struggled with what I wanted to do. I considered nursing, criminal justice, and there was also a point that anything and everything was put on the back ......

Words: 354 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Changing Our Lives Essay

...Assignment 2 Changing Our Lives Essay changing our lives essays Alicia Carter Instructor: LaRuth Ensley ENG 090 10-22-2012 Changing Our Lives Essay We all want success, money, and happiness right? Would a college education not be the key to having all of those things? Returning to school now would ensure that I could have money, with a successful job and happiness in the gratification of completing my degree, all the while, setting a stellar example for my daughter, making my family proud and allowing me the opportunity to obtain a college degree. All of this is essential positive things to add to this journey called life. I was once the young high school graduate with bright eyes and a promising future going to college. I enrolled in a large local University and started my journey to arming myself with the necessary tools to have a stellar career. After the initial shock of freedom and adulthood, two years later, I found myself socially at the top of my game, but educationally the dean had placed me the former 3.8 high school student on academic probation. I was now struggling to make the grade in college. I now know that I was not focused, or driven, my priorities were not intact and the entire long-term goal to me was just a fleeting futuristic challenge. The importance of college had not set in and therefore it appeared I was paying to go to school to become a better social butterfly. My parents did not seem to find the importance of that......

Words: 819 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Changing Our Lives Essay

...| Changing Our Lives Essay | By: Jorell Austin | | Dr. Kristina Nelson English 090 - Writing Fundamentals March 18, 2013 Dr. Kristina Nelson English 090 Writing Fundamentals January 13, 2013 Dr. Kristina Nelson English 090 Writing Fundamentals January 13, 2013 Changing Our Lives Essay In 2012 I made an important decision. I decided to go back to school to earn my degree. For the first time (in a long time) I decided to put myself first and to care for myself the way I have cared for so many other people over the years. My quest to earn a degree actually started long before 2013. Like most people I grew up in a traditional middle class family with two hard working and wonderful parents. My parents (like most parents) wanted me to do better and accomplish more than they did. Both of my parents came from blue collar working households without much money and no formal education. My father joined the Navy at 15 in an effort to escape racism and inequality in Natchez, MS. He never completed high school, but he was street savvy beyond his years. My mother was the daughter of a maid and a ship laborer. In 1966, she completed high school and enrolled at the local junior college. She completed her junior year of college but was forced to drop out when my grandmother suffered a stroke that left her paralyzed and unable to work. Although my mother never complained, she never seemed to get over the disappointment of not earning her college......

Words: 1027 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

My Passions in Life

...look up to them. My friends push me when I cannot and help me to be a better version of myself. My friends have helped me more than they probable know, and because of that I will always be grateful towards them and will always have a passion for them. My most important passion of all is my family, especially my parents. They raised me and made me the way I am and for that I must also thank them. They raised a daughter that I hope their proud of because I do my very best just to make them proud. I owe everything to them, they are the reason that I am here today. I love them and I will always love them. I am very passionate about these things, they mean a lot to me and I do not want anything to change that. These are the things that I live...

Words: 364 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

How the Internet Is Changing Our Social, Political, and Economical Lives

...Jeffrey Cole, Director of the Center for Communication Policy at UCLA, spoke at the Milken Institute Forum on Sept. 21 on “How the Internet Is Changing Our Social, Political, and Economic Lives.” The following is an edited transcript of his remarks. “How the Internet Is Changing Our Social, Political, and Economic Lives” Thank you. I am overwhelmed at this turnout. I don’t think it’s for me. You must be interested in this Internet thing we’re all talking about. But before we talk about all this, I’m going to tell you a little bit about how I got interested in the Internet, and how this ties into some of the work I’m doing. About three years ago, I discovered something that was really compelling to me. I discovered that television viewing among kids under the age of 14 was down for the first time in the history of television. For the first time in the 51 years of television, since 1948, kids had found something they liked as much or more than television — computers and the Internet. And this made me, as a social scientist, begin to realize that this technology phenomenon, which is not a fad, really will affect everything, and will transform much. It will have an influence like the printing press did, I believe, on just about everything. And I want to demonstrate some of that today. We can already see some of that beginning to happen. Alan Greenspan, a few months ago, called the Internet “the engine of the economic expansion.” It’s been linked as the single......

Words: 6322 - Pages: 26