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Chaucer

In: English and Literature

Submitted By tanner38837
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Professor Name English 101
09 Feb 2014
The Miller’s Tale
Geoffrey Chaucer was a deeply religious person that was distressed about the level of corruption in his Church. Unable to come out and attack the erosion of morality and campaign against rampant corruption he put pen to paper. Chaucer used the Canterbury Tales as a way of attacking religious excess and argue that the Church should return to its pious roots. The Canterbury Tales were written from the prospective of a traveling Pilgrim coming across various people in his travels. These encounters are what lead to the tales. A prologue before each story lays out the purpose of the tale and what kind of tale it will be. The more rough and crude tales, such as The Miller’s Tale, are told in front of a raucous crowd that is usually in a pub or bar. These tales are often told to a loud and boisterous crowd and the pub owner often has to defuse tensions. Chaucer paired stories together as either a response to a previous story or an attack on a profession that would be refuted in the following story.
The Miller’s Tale was the second tale and was the first story to quite or repay the story teller. It also should be noted that this tale followed a chivalrous and high society tale called The Knight’s Tale. Chaucer purposefully place The Miller’s Tale to occur after the The Knight’s Tale to provide comedic relief and contrast the previous tale. Further, the prologue to The Miller’s Tale sets the stage for the next story when an infuriated listener attempts to shout down the pilgrim for disparaging the carpentry profession. The next tale will be The Reeve’s Tale and Chaucer paired it with The Miller’s Tale as a rebuttal to the disparaging of the main character in The Miller’s Tale. The prologue is also used by the storyteller to apologize and ask forgiveness for the bawdy story he’s about to tell.
The...

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