Child Labor in America

In: Business and Management

Submitted By shanekim2
Words 1955
Pages 8
BUSINESS LAW I APPLIED RESEARCH

Child Labor Laws












Shane T. Martin







Doctor Aaron Bazzoli

Park University Internet Campus



A course paper presented to the School of Arts and Sciences and Distance Learning

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Baccalaureate




Business Law I

Park University

December 2012
Outline
- Introduction
- Early America
o Placed children were employed
o Agricultural jobs
o Lack of safety standards
o Lost educational opportunities
- Opposition
o 1900 Census report opened America’s eyes
o National Consumers League started campaigning for children’s rights
o National Child Labor Committee formed in 1904
- Laws Regarding
o Problem too pervasive to “law down”
o Federal regulation needed to prevent employers from taking business across state lines
o Beveridge and Parsons introduce legislation in 1906
▪ Debated but not put into law
o Many tries by Congress but no laws that stuck
o Roosevelt elected
▪ National Industrial Recovery Act passed in 1933.
• Banned industrial homework and eliminated child labor
• Ruled unconstitutional in 1935
▪ Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933
• Ruled unconstituational
▪ Walsh-Healey Act required government restrict their purchases to companies that did not utilize child labor
▪ Fair Labor Standard Act of 1938
• Established ages and hours in which a child can legally work
• Enforcement of law difficult
- Conclusion

Child labor is defined as “work that deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, and that is harmful to physical and mental…...

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