Child Labor in India

In: Social Issues

Submitted By ikatamta
Words 353
Pages 2
Policy paper

Introduction

Child labor is one of the main problems in developing world, especially in the different rural areas of Asian countries. The paper focuses on the issue of child labor and inequality in Gujarat, state of India. The child labor and its impacts on education are very challenging for India therefore solving this problem is a priority issue for the Ministry of agriculture and Rural Development of India.
Children are one of the biggest values of the country and their education and wellbeing is one of the priorities of nation. The ministry recognizes the importance of the issue of child labor especially in economic, cultural and social directions. The paper presents the policy plans of the Ministry to address the problematic issues based on inequality and child labor and outlines the policy strategies which should be adopted to address the immensely complex issue of child labor.
The child labor is not the issue that concerns only India, it is the big and challenging issue for other Asian countries as well. According to an ILO study on child labor in Asia, 5.5 million children had been forced in labor in Asia. (ILO, 2000), According to ILO 2007, about 10.9 per cent (0.57 million) of children in Ghana, ages 5-14 participate in the labor force and do not attend school. Children in rural areas are more likely than those in urban areas to work without attending school (15.4 vs. 2.9 per cent).
The main causes of the child labor in India, namely in Gujarat are poverty and lack of social security. Due to the extreme poverty parents have no other way than sending their own children for work instead of sending them to schools.
The objectives of the policy brief is to outline the issues of child labor in Gujarat and its impacts on the development of India, to address the current challenges regarding this issue. The paper also formulates the set…...

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