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Chinas Scientific and Technological Actions

In: Social Issues

Submitted By rajkoushik
Words 5635
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China’s Scientific & Technological Actions on Climate Change

Jointly Issued by Ministry of Science and Technology National Development and Reform Commission Ministry of Foreign Affairs Ministry of Education Ministry of Finance Ministry of Water Resources Ministry of Agriculture State Environmental Protection Administration State Forestry Administration Chinese Academy of Sciences China Meteorology Administration National Natural Science Foundation State Oceanic Administration China Association for Science and Technology

June, 2007

Contents

I. Current Status of Climate Change and Urgent Demands for S&T............................................... 1 1. Climate change is an increasingly prominent issue that brings about profound impacts on human societies ......................................................................................................................... 1 2. An appropriate response to climate change would be very much related to China’s economic and social development ............................................................................................ 1 3. Addressing climate change calls for urgent S&T activities .................................................. 1 II. China’s S&T Achievements in Climate Change ......................................................................... 2 1. Scientific research and technological development .............................................................. 2 2. Infrastructure buildup for Scientific Research ...................................................................... 3 3. Human Resources Development and Research Structural Buildup ...................................... 3 III. Guidelines, Principles and Targets ............................................................................................. 4 1. Guidelines…...

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