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Chronic Kidney Disease

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Submitted By ladylee
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Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein

Early detection and prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease

Contents page

Definition of key terms used in the assignment

Abbreviations used in the assignment

Introduction
Chronic Kidney Disease, a condition characterised by a gradual loss of kidney function. CKD is often misdiagnosed owing to the lack of knowledge about the disease.
With early detection and prevention of the progression of the disease CKD patients can still enjoy life to the fullest while they manage their disease, however if the healthcare professionals fail to identify the disease on time the patient can suffer dire consequences.
Besides the financial implications associated with the disease, there are the emotional implications together with physical and psychological.
This assignment seeks to explore such implications in an effort to highlight the importance of early detection and prevention of kidney disease, with the best interest of the patient at heart

Background
Normal kidney anatomy

http://doctorstock.photoshelter.com/image/I000096SqkYwaLhE

The bean-shaped kidneys lie in retroperitoneal position in the superior lumbar region. Extending approximately from T12 to L3, the kidneys receive some form of protection from the lower part of the rib cage (E.N. Marieb, K Hoehn, 2010)
The kidneys functions can be divided into two, non-excretory functions and excretory functions. Under excretory we have Glomerular filtration, Tubule reabsorption and Tubule secretion. Making up the non-excretory functions of the kidney are Renin-Angiotensin system, production and function of Erythropoietin and lastly activation and function of Vitamin D3

What is Chronic Kidney Disease?
Is the drop in GFR to less than 60mL/min/1.73m2 over three consecutive months with or without kidney damage.
Chronic Kidney disease can be classified...

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