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Civil Liberties

In: Historical Events

Submitted By evademartino
Words 2983
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Americans today enjoy many civil liberties regardless of race, sex, sexual orientation or ethnic background. The road to earning these civil liberties has been tainted with much pain, tears and suffering. It has not been easy for the different groups represented within the population of Americans to obtain and protect their rights. This essay will recount the bloody paths Americans of all colors had to follow in order to enjoy the civil liberties which so many take for granted today. The origins of civil liberties for the United States dates back to England. The United States has a clean start by including the Bill of Rights in the American Constitution. The Bill of rights at first were the symbolism of American ideals because there was no way of enforcing them until 1803 where in the case of Marbury v. Madison the Supreme Court took action in striking down laws for the first time that were considered unconstitutional. From that point on the Supreme Court established a precedent of wielding the power to strike down any unconstitutional legislation. Marbury v. Madison happened long before the Civil War and before any of the other cases mentioned. However its importance to civil liberties is essential to any civil liberty essays because it was the one case that allowed for the Supreme Court to take action and enforce the bill of rights along with any other law that is deemed unconstitutional. It was this case that brought about the exercise of judicial review in the United States under Article III of the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing the rights of every American one case at a time.
Although countless Americans lost their civil liberties during the civil war due to President Lincoln suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus, a larger number of others benefited by Lincoln’s polices as did African Americans and many other groups in future generations thereafter. During the...

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