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Civil Rights Leaders

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Civil Rights
The civil rights movement was a worldwide political movement for equality before the law occurring between approximately 1950 and 1980. In many situations it took the form of campaigns of civil resistance aimed at achieving change by nonviolent forms of resistance. In some situations it was accompanied, or followed, by civil unrest and armed rebellion. The process was long and tenuous in many countries, and many of these movements did not fully achieve their goals although, the efforts of these movements did lead to improvements in the legal rights of previously oppressed groups of people.

Table of Contents

Malcolm X…………………………..pg. 3 - 5

Martin Luther King Jr. ……………pg. 6-7

Rosa Parks ………………………….pg. 8- 10

Stokely Carmichael…………………pg. 11-14

Marcus Garvey………………………pg. 15-17

Frederick Douglass…………………..pg. 18-20

John Brown…………………………pg. 21- 23

Medgar Evers ………………………pg. 24- 25

Nat Turner…………………………..pg. 26- 27

Homer Plessy……………………..pg. 28-30

Malcolm X

[pic]

Malcolm X May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz,was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist. To his admirers, he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, and violence. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.
Malcolm X's father died—killed by white supremacists, it was rumored—when he was young, and at least one of his uncles was lynched. When he was thirteen, his mother was placed in a mental hospital, and he was placed in a series of foster homes. In 1946, at age 20, he went to prison for breaking and entering.
In prison,...

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