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Community Assessment and Analysis

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Running Head: Community Assessment and Analysis

Community Assessment and Analysis: The State of Arizona
Team Purple
Grand Canyon University: NRS 427V
September 9, 2012

Community Assessment and Analysis
Arizona is a state located in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the western United States and the mountain west with the state’s capitol and largest city being, Phoenix. The second largest Arizona city is Tucson, which is then followed in size by eight Phoenix metropolitan area cities: Mesa, Glendale, Chandler, Scottsdale, Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria and Yuma. Arizona is the 48th state and last of the contiguous states admitted to the Union, achieving statehood on February 14, 1912. It is one of the four corner states, which borders Utah, Nevada, and California. It also has a 389-mile (626 km) international border with the states of Sonora and Baja California in Mexico.
Arizona is noted for its desert climate; exceptionally hot summers, and mild winters, and it also features pine forests and mountain ranges in the northern high country with much cooler weather than in the lower deserts. The state is covered with beautiful desert landscape. There is also the less known pine-covered high country of the Colorado Plateau in the north-central portion of the state which contrasts with the desert Basin and Range region in the southern portions of the state. It is known for being home to one of the natural wonders of the world, the Grand Canyon, and its colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River. In addition to the Grand Canyon, many other national forests, parks, and monuments are located in the state. More than a quarter of its territory is Federal Trust Land which serves as the home of the Navajo Nation, the Hopi tribe, the Tohono O'odham, Apache and Yaqui people and various Yuma tribes, such as the Yavapai, Quechan and Hualapai. Arizona’s native population is one of the largest in the nation. It comes third, after only Oklahoma and California.
Arizona holds a recognized geopolitical population. Aside from its large native population, being a border state with Mexico makes Arizona one of the largest Hispanic populated states. According to the U.S. census bureau 30.1% of Arizonians are of Hispanic/Latino origin. Of that population, most are of Mexican descendants. In fact, apart from California, Arizona holds the 2nd largest Mexican population making Spanish the most popular language second only to English. The median household income is $50,448 and 15.3% of Arizonians live below poverty level.
Because of its well known Hispanic population, Arizona’s phenomenological features are significantly influenced by Mexican culture and heritage. Visualizing the Spanish/Sonora architecture homes throughout communities and seeing the numerous Catholic churches is an everyday sight. Attending community celebrations such as “Cinco de Mayo” or “Tamal and Taco” festival is always interesting and are run throughout the year. There is an abundance of Mexican food stands no matter how small the community.
Social interaction is defined as a relationship that exists between two or more individuals or groups. This relationship is a matter of mutual respect towards one another. It involves understanding action, behaviors, and practices. Different types of social interactions may include: Cooperation, conflict, social exchange, conformity, or coercion. Cooperation is defined as members or other groups who work together by putting forth their efforts and labor towards a common goal. Conflict is exhibited when these members or groups work against one another. Defeating or winning against another member of the team is seen as more important than achieving the common goal set forth. Conflict is good in some circumstances since it does help in changing one’s beliefs and values and attracts attention to disparities within the group. Social exchange is known as a mutual relationship among groups with the expectation of receiving a reward in return for services they provide or complete. The earned benefit or reward is considered to be more important than the actual relationship among the group members. Conformity is yet another type of social interaction. Its members adjust and adapt their character to match the behavior of the other people within the group. Examples of these types of relationships can be found within universities, churches, and Hispanic cultures. In social interaction, coercion is considered forceful and dominating. Members are mandated to behave in certain ways.
Within the Hispanic community in Arizona, they celebrate “Cinco De Mayo”. The Hispanic population comes out in groups to remember and celebrate the day Mexico became independent. They participate in many different church communities and worship and pray together. They live together as groups in peaceful harmony, maintain good relationships, and work together often. Hispanics work together better within groups of the same Hispanic origin. The goals and interests of social interaction among the Hispanics include weddings, birthdays, naming ceremonies, and babysitting each other’s children. Other interests of community socialization include getting to know one another within the community and establishing friendships which oftentimes leads to marriage. The members of the Hispanic culture wish to promote unity among each member and aid in community development. They offer information about what is happening within their communities to each other such as past events, stories, situations, and other opportunities which may be available. They accept ideas from members within their community and work in harmony. Social interaction within the Hispanic culture allows them to cope with different issues such as bereavement, immigration, and settling into homes.
Some barriers and challenges among the Hispanic population include quarreling and misunderstanding among the members; some of which may end in physical fighting and hospitalizations. Lack of cooperation and conflicts may result in the goal not being accomplished. These families are often large and the amount of people in the homes may cause instances of great wear and tear in the home and certain illnesses may be increased due to the many different people living in one home. Hispanic people do like to drink and often drink until drunk which often results in arrest and a criminal record which may lead to deportation for the person. Also, they may not have a lot of money or time to spend with their families. Ill health among the members may also prove to be a challenge.
Arizona is a beautiful state which boasts to visitors and residents alike the best of both worlds: desert communities and mountainous landscapes. It is the home to the Grand Canyon, the Hoover Dam, and the Painted Desert. The climate is very hot in certain areas and cooler among the mountain ranges. Arizonians are people with unique cultures and backgrounds. The state is mostly comprised of people of a Native culture and because of its close proximity to Mexico; it has many people of Hispanic heritage. Hispanics enjoy celebration. They celebrate May 5th, otherwise known as “Cinco De Mayo” which is the day Mexico became independent. The residents of Arizona are perceived as having a very strong faith and you can see many churches in the communities. These churches provide help and assistance to the different communities. The Hispanic populations in these communities have a very strong work ethic. Hispanic families are usually pretty close and are very involved with their families to the point where naming a baby is a family affair. As with any state and community the people of Arizona have their issues. Overcrowding in the home due to their large, extended families living together can result in wear and tear of the home and the close proximity of the family results in increased sickness. They often work in dangerous and unsafe occupations. Their diets increase the prevalence of obesity, the incidence of teen pregnancy is high, and they do not value health promotion mostly due to language barriers. Recommendations for this community that could help to improve the health of the community would be: Provide interpreters at clinical facilities that Hispanics frequent, educate them on healthy diets and alternatives to their present diets as it is sometimes very hard to change one’s diet, and educate them on the dangers of certain occupations and hand washing to decrease the instance of work-related accidents and common illnesses among families. In conclusion, the writers find it very interesting that the date Arizona became a part of the United States was on February 14th. This day is filled with love, hope and kindness for all people who celebrate it. With the proper teaching and other interventions made available to the residents of the many different communities of Arizona, it is hopeful they could become healthier and have a greater future which includes happiness, love, and hope for themselves and their families. Healthcare professionals must work alongside the residents to achieve this goal of a healthy, happy, and wholesome life.

Functional Health Patterns Community Assessment
Value/Belief Pattern
The differences in cultural beliefs have effects on attitudes towards medical care, their willingness to understand, comply and adjust to the course of illness. They believe that health is holistic and there is connection between body, mind, and soul. Their cultural beliefs influence the cause of illness, presentation of are mainly, and communication of health problems, and how they seek healthcare. They mainly believe in God. Catholics usually have spiritual items in their homes.
They do not value health promotion due to lack of language assistance and prefer ER visits. They may receive misdiagnosis due to lack of communication. They receive improper medication.
Their cultural values are used to motivate behavior to reduce the risk of diseases. It also improves interactions and health outcomes and helps them to seek healthier behavior. They spend their money on extended family and on drinks.
Actual Diagnosis: Risk for Spiritual Distress Intervention
Interventions: Use therapeutic communication when approaching patient and encourage participation in religious activities.
Nutritional/Metabolic
Obesity – Arizona has been listed among the most obese states in the country and 15th out of the 50 states for childhood obesity.
The CDC statistics reveals that among Hispanics in the 50 states and Washington DC, the prevalence of obesity ranged from 21% to 36.7% with 11 states having an obesity prevalence of equal or greater than 30%.
The food programs are available to low income families. According to SNAP 20.4% and Yuma 26.1%, in AZ schools, drinking fountains are the source of free drinking water. The stated educational department set fountains to maintain # of fountains per student to be 9. Additionally the local water utilities ensure that the water meets the states federal drinking water standards. They maintain the contaminants from getting into pipes by flushing fountains or replacing old pipes.
They love starchy foods such as rice, flours and chips. They consume a lot of beer and soda which puts them at risk for DM.
Actual diagnosis: Imbalance nutrition more than body requirement.
Interventions: Dietary counseling, weight reduction through exercising, portion control, weight monitoring, High protein, more fruits and vegetable intake, and increase water intake.
Activity/Exercise
The fastest growing Hispanic group is the youth .The highly educated male Hispanics, aged 18-34, are the most active. They are interested in outdoor activities. Hispanic youth’s major issue is obesity. Most Hispanics can afford to attend gyms, YMCA, and participate in other sports.
Actual Diagnosis: Impaired physical activity
Interventions: Nutritional status should be assessed, level of mobility of patient should be determined, cardiopulmonary status should be evaluated, and Doctors consent should be obtained before physical activities start.
Sexuality
In this community, there is an increase in teen pregnancy due to their religion being against contraception. The teens also engage in other sexual activities such as oral sex which results in an increase in STDs. 36% of women are reported to be sexually abused. 26% of young girls were pregnant before reaching 18 years old.
Actual Diagnosis: Ineffective sexual patterns
Intervention: Encourage use of contraceptives
Sleep/Rest
Insufficient sleep hours have been linked to crashes of motor vehicles, errors at work, and lack of daily work performance. Causes of sleep deprivation include snoring, obstructive sleep apnea or noise from extended family.
Actual Diagnosis: Sleep Pattern Disturbance
Interventions: Noise reduction, limit alcohol and caffeine consumption, bedtime routine should be assessed.
Coping with Stress
They interact with each other by providing hugs and offering assistance. Hispanics also drink or smoke to cope with stress. Stress management resources are available through National Parent help line 1-855-4A-PARENT.
Risk Diagnosis: Risk for ineffective coping (individual, family or community)
Interventions: Client monitoring to prevent harm to self or others, approach client with verbal and nonverbal therapeutic communication, client should be informed of other coping methods.
Elimination
The most common air contaminants in Arizona are dust and arsenic particles. Increase in respiratory disease and arsenic exposure contributes to congenital malfunctions. The quality of air is 1.8 breathable. The air pollution comes from factories, construction, agriculture, trains, and buses. This impacts the lungs and causes throat irritation, wheezing, and other breathing difficulties during exercise. Waste disposal is through recycling and dumpsters that go to a landfill. Signs are posted so that the public knows which areas have been sprayed with pesticides.
Risk Diagnosis: Risk for impaired urinary elimination
Interventions: Monitor urinary output, color, odor, frequency, dysuria and possible retention.
Role/Relationships
Having a church in a community is perceived to be very essential. It helps to build and structure the lives of the residents. There is usually reduction of violence and crime. Church provides some assistance to the community. PTAs create an opportunity for parents to participate in their children’s education. This group of people is known to have incidences of gang involvement and recruitment. The reason is due to poor academic performance and school drop outs.
Actual Diagnosis: Interruptive Family Processes
Interventions: Assess family developmental stages, prevention of substance abuse, family support, and family coping enhancement.
Health perception/Management
The Mexican-origin workers have occupation dangers which include: heat-related conditions, and women's health problems, such as violence, prenatal care, and treatable cancers. The well-being and health of Mexican Americans related to the rest of the U.S. population are usually discussed on a daily basis. Cultural values, social and economic status, and family concerns can be contributory to abuse. There is an increase of AIDS due to the cultural attitude towards sex.
The current immunization rates for influenza for adults aged at least 18 years are 39.5% in Arizona. The obesity and diabetic rates are higher for Mexican-Americans than for non-Hispanic whites (79% vs. 67% and 13% vs. 8%, respectively). Number of deaths: 80,058
Death per 100,000 populations: 249.9. Infant death per 1,000 live births: 5.58
The goal of the diabetic prevention program is to prevent onset of disease. The classes involve diabetic, nutritional, exercises, education, and ability to change. Blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar are included in the pre and post class screening.
Actual Diagnosis: Ineffective Health Maintenance
Interventions: Assess the family history for risk factors to establish baseline data and reinforce need for careful monitoring of health status to prevent complication.
Self-Perception/Self-Concept
Mexican-American communities play and watch soccer to maintain their heritage. Mexico’s soccer League, Chivas USA, is used as an outlet for many Mexicans in the Arizona area to build up their ethnic identities. During 1920-1930 the Mexican settlers were few in number and isolated compared with 1940-1950 settlers when their cultures and religions fostered their ethnic solidarity. They have a caring attitude and are a family-centered community. They use pamphlets, media and web sites for means of communication.
Actual Diagnosis: Anxiety related to disease condition
Interventions: Allow patient to verbalize his/her fear, establish more effective coping mechanisms to increase self esteem, assess the level of anxiety by looking at body language, speech patterns, facial expression, and defense mechanisms, keep environment stresses/stimulation low when anxiety is high to control the level of anxiety, maintain accepting and helpful attitude toward client, do not attempt to remove defense mechanism at any time.
Cognitive/Perceptual
Primary language:
There is a communication barrier among health care providers and patients who speak different languages. This causes misunderstanding of disease condition and errors in prescription medication.
Educational experiences is one of the disadvantages among Mexican Americans due to barriers in communication, which result in lower rates of high school and college graduations, which in turn causes hindrance for employment opportunities. 3% of Mexicans count as the US immigrant population (both naturalized citizens and non-citizens). Between 1970 and 2010, the amount of immigrants has increased 20.4 million.
Educational offering:
English courses were offered to Spanish speaking people through continuous education, media, and public school systems and in-service for qualified individuals. They make use of library, internet, and computers. “Mexican American History Online,” in the Teaching Resources section of the Organization of American Historians Magazine of History, October 2009, Vol. 23, Issue 4. The article is available to read under the Project Resources section. http://nacts.asu.edu/projects/teaching-mexican-american-history
Actual diagnosis: Knowledge deficit
Interventions: Assess the level of understanding on disease condition, teach the client about disease prevention and health perception, provide the necessary resources for healthcare services, encourage the client to seek healthcare services and provide interpreter when necessary to increase communication between the patient and healthcare provider.
Health Perception/ Health Management • Hispanic origin workers have occupation dangers which include: Heat-related conditions, and women's health problems such as violence, prenatal care, and treatable cancers. The well-being and health of Mexican Americans related to the rest of the U.S. population are usually discussed on a daily basis
• Cultural values, social and economic status, and family concerns can be contributory to abuse. There is increase in risk of AIDS due the cultural attitude towards sex
• The current immunization rates for influenza for adults aged at least 18 years are 39.5% in Arizona. The obesity and diabetic rates are higher for Mexican-Americans than for non-Hispanic whites (79% vs. 67% and 13% vs. 8%, respectively). Number of deaths: 80,058
• Death per 100,000 populations: 249.9. Infant death per 1,000 live births: 5.58
• The goal of the diabetic prevention program is to prevent onset of disease. The classes involve diabetic, nutritional, exercises education and ability to change. Blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar are included in the pre and post class screening
• Actual Diagnosis: Ineffective Health Maintenance
• Interventions:
• Assess the family history for risk factors, to establish baseline data
• Reinforce need for careful monitoring of health status to prevent complication
• Assist in reduction of stress
• Teach the patient how to access health care services and provide necessary phone numbers for easy access
Values and Beliefs • Non-compliance with illness
• Cultural beliefs influence cause of illness
• Religion practice is Catholic
• Hangs spiritual items in the home
• Wears spiritual items on the body
• Actual Diagnosis: Risk for spiritual distress Intervention
• Interventions:
• Use therapeutic communication when approaching patients
• Encourage participation in religious activities
Cognitive/Perceptual Primary language:
• There is a communication barrier among health care providers and patient of different language. This causes misunderstanding of disease condition and errors in prescription medication
• Educational experiences is one of difficult disadvantage among Mexican American due to barrier in communication, which results in lowest rate of high school and college attainment, which also causes hindrance for employment opportunities
• 3% of Mexicans count as the US immigrant population (both naturalized citizens and non-citizens). Between 1970 and 2010, the immigrants have increased 20.4 million
Educational offering
• English courses were offered to Spanish speaking through continuous education, media, and public school systems and in-service for qualified individual. They make use of library, internet, and computers. “Mexican American History Online,” in the Teaching Resources section of the Organization of American Historians Magazine of History, October 2009, Vol. 23, Issue 4. The article is available to read under the Project Resources section http://nacts.asu.edu/projects/teaching-mexican-american-history

• Actual diagnosis: Knowledge deficit
• Interventions:
• Assess the level of understanding on disease condition.
• Teach the client about the disease prevention and health promotion
• Provide the necessary resources for healthcare services
• Encourage the client to seek healthcare services and provide interpreter when necessary to increase communication between the patient and healthcare provider
Nutrition/Metabolic • Arizona lists among the most obese state in the country
• 15th out of 50 states for childhood obesity
• CDC statistic reveals obesity prevalence to be 21%-36.7%
• Food programs to low-income from WIC and SNAP
• Yuma reads 26.1% involvement in the programs
• A water fountain to 9 students
• Local Water Agencies ensures compliance with State and Federal drinking water standards
• Prevention of water contaminants
• Hispanics love starchy foods such as rice, flours and chips
• Alcohol and soda consumption
• Actual diagnosis: Imbalance nutrition more than body requirement.
• Interventions:
• Dietary counseling
• Weight reduction through exercises
• Portion control Weight monitoring
• High protein, more fruits and vegetable intake Increase in water intake
• Encourage increase in physical exercise
Activity/Exercise • The fastest growing Hispanic group is the youth
• The highly educated male Hispanics, ages 18-34, are the most active
• They are interested in outdoor activities. Hispanic youth major issue is obesity
• Most Hispanics can afford to attend gyms, YMCA and sports
• Actual Diagnosis: Impaired physical activity
• Interventions:
• Nutritional status should be assessed
• Level of mobility of patient should be determined
• Cardiopulmonary status should be evaluated
• Seek Doctors consent before physical activities start
Elimination • The common most air contaminants in Arizona are dust and arsenic particles
• Increase in respiratory disease and arsenic exposure contributes to congenital malfunctions
• The quality of airs is 1.8 breathable. The air pollution comes from factories, construction, agriculture, trains and buses
• These impacts the lungs and cause throat irritation, wheezing and breathing difficulties during exercise
• Waste disposal is through recycling and dumpsters that go to a landfill
• Signs are posted so that the public knows which areas have been sprayed with pesticides
• Risk Diagnosis: Risk for impaired urinary elimination
• Interventions: Monitor urinary output, color, odor, frequency, dysuria and possible retention
Sleep/Rest • Insufficient sleep hours have been linked to crashes of motor vehicle, errors at work and lack of daily work performance
• Causes of sleep deprivation include snoring, obstructive sleep apnea or noise from extended family
• Actual Diagnosis: Sleep Pattern Disturbance
• Interventions:
• Noise reduction
• Limit alcohol and caffeine consumption
• Bedtime routine should be assessed
• Decrease bedtime activities
Role/Relationship • Having a church in a community is perceived to be very essential and helps to build and structure the lives of the residents
• There is usually reduction of violence and crime. Church provides some assistance to the community
• PTAs create an opportunity for parents to participate in their children’s education
• This group of people is known to have incidences of gang involvement and recruitment
• The reason is due to poor academic performance and school drop outs
• Actual Diagnosis: Interruptive Family Processes
• Interventions:
• Assess family developmental stages
• Prevention of substance abuse
• Family support
• Family coping enhancement
Coping/Stress • They interact with each other by providing hugs and offer assistance
• They will also drink or smoke to compensate with stress. Stress management resources are available through National Parent help line 1-855-4A-PARENT
• Risk Diagnosis: Risk for ineffective coping (individual , family, or community)
• Interventions:
• Client monitoring to prevent harm to self or others. Approach client with verbal and nonverbal therapeutic communication
• Client should be informed of other coping methods
Self-Perception Self-Concept • Mexican-American communities play and watch soccer to maintain their heritage, Mexico’s soccer League, Chivas USA, is used as an outlet for many Mexicans in Arizona to build up their ethnic identities
• During 1920-1930 the Mexican settlers were few in number and isolated compared with 1940- 1950 settlers when their cultures and religious fostered their ethnic solidarity
• They have caring attitude and are family –Centered community. They use pamphlets, media and web sites for means of communication
• Actual Diagnosis: Anxiety related to disease condition
• Interventions:
• Allow patient to verbalize his/her fear
• Establish more effective coping mechanism to increase self esteem
• Assess the level of anxiety by looking at body language, speech patterns, facial expression, and defense mechanism
• Keep environment stresses/stimulation low when anxiety is high to control the level of anxiety
• Maintain accepting and helpful attitude toward client, do not attempt to remove defense mechanism at any time
Sexuality/ Reproductive • There is an increase in teen pregnancy due to their religion being against contraception
• The teens also engage in other sexual route activities such as oral sex which results in an increase in STDs
• 36% of women are reported to be sexually abused
• 26% were pregnant before reaching 18 years old
• Actual Diagnosis: Ineffective sexual patterns
• Interventions:
• Encourage use of contraceptives
• Encourage abstinence
• Health educates the community about of condom and other preventive level for STDS

References
Aguila, J. (2009, October). Teaching mexican american history. Retrieved from http://nacts.asu.edu/projects/teaching-mexican-american-history
America's story(2012). Retrieved September 4, 2012 from, http://americaslibrary.gov/es/az/es/_az_subj.html
Arizona(2012). Retrieved September 4, 2012 from, http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04000.html
Lebowitz, M. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/cdm/search/searchterm/Mexican-American
Rosenblum, M. (2011, June). Mexican and central american immigrants in the united states. Retrieved from http://www.migrationpolicy.org/pubs/MexCentAmimmigrants.pdf www.answers.ask.com/science/psychology/types-of-science/psychology/types-of-social-interaction www.unc.edu.tedmoun/papers/soc

CLC Group Projects Agreement
CLC Course Information
Course Name/Section Number: NRS-427V Concepts in Community and Public Health.( 0191)
Instructor’s Name: Professor Jude Belmonte
Start Date of the Course: August 13, 2012

CLC Member Contact Information
(Who is in our group?)

CLC Member Name Primary Email Address Secondary Email Address Other Contact Information
Anne Ugezene augezene@my.gcu.edu 409-539-8701
Fidelia Iwuofor Fiwuofor@my.gcu.edu 281-961-9070
Josephine Ejimadu Jejimadu@my.gcu.edu 281-217-6952
Diana Monroy dmonroy@my.gcu.edu 928-550-1250
Naomi Coleman Mom2Nevaeh@gmail.com NColeman1@my.gcu.edu 727-815-5178

CLC Group Values (What do we need to do to ensure our team’s success?)

What each team member agrees to do Why this is important to the team
Check into the CLC regularly to review progress on the assignment Keeps us all on the same page. Help team to stay on track and incorporate any additional assignments or changes if needed.
Contribute ideas and feedback to the group from initial discussions throughout project completion In order to succeed as a team, everyone must contribute ideas whether they are used or not. If everyone contributes, then we all have ownership for the team project and are more likely to follow through with the plan.
Communicate with all CLC members as soon as a problem or issue arises Communication helps team members be informed and gets us to our goal quicker. If there is a problem, we can all work together to solve it to the benefit of all. If we all check in at least daily, and everyone posts how things are progressing, we can stay up to speed, waiting until deadlines are looming will just make things worse, and we can all work together to encourage each other if we know what is going on.
Maintain respectful communications with all team members It is essential to be respectful in order to communicate properly. It encourages collaboration and cohesiveness among the group.
Complete assigned tasks by the deadlines set by the CLC members All team members are counting on each other to accomplish our goal in a timely manner.
Take a leadership role in CLC assignments When everyone takes a role, they are assuming responsibility to accomplish what is assigned to that role
Make sure to cite and reference all sources of information used in completing tasks Gives credibility to the project. Authors of original works and sources rightfully deserve recognition for their work.
Other:
Other:

Project Management Specifics
(What needs to be undertaken to complete the CLC project?)

CLC Group Member’s Name Task to be completed by this team member Due date for completing the task for the CLC to review
All members of Team Purple Contributing one or more ideas for how the project should be completed All throughout the proposed assignment.
Iwuofor Fidelia Outlining the CLC project August 31, 2012
Josephine Ejimadu Assigning tasks to CLC members August 31, 2012
All members of Team Purple Performing research on assigned topics and writing it up for CLC members to review All throughout the proposed assignment.
Anne Ugezene Making sure everyone meets their assigned deadlines for tasks All throughout the proposed assignment.
Naomi Coleman Proofreading and editing the paper September 9, 2012
Naomi Coleman Submitting the paper via the Assignments feature by the due date deadline September 9, 2012 Other: Other:

CLC Group Interaction Guidelines (How can we anticipate and deal with group conflict when it arises?)

What could happen to impede our teamwork What we will do if this happens
A CLC member doesn’t provide project ideas or feedback to other team members Encourage member to provide ideas.
A CLC member doesn’t complete his or her task at all This member should not receive any credit for the project, as it is unfair to the team as a whole.
A CLC member completes his or her task, but turns it in after the agreed-upon due date This again creates unnecessary stress for the whole team, and more than likely someone else will have to step up and take over that member's part of the project, in which case they should not receive credit.
Other:
Other:

CLC Group Review Process
(What makes a CLC effective?)

What did our CLC do well this time? What can we do to be a more effective CLC next time? Team exhibited excellent communication skills, work ethic, and kindness towards their fellow students. This team worked really well together. However, there is always room for improvement. On our upcoming Part II of this project, we will aim to support each other even better than we did on this project!
Work was in and completed on time as discussed amongst team members.
Everyone on the team learned something about Arizona!

© 2008. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

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