Premium Essay

Comparison and Contrast on the Compromise of 1850

In: Historical Events

Submitted By miamberjon28
Words 549
Pages 3
Comparison and Contrast between William Henry Seward, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster’s Speeches on the Compromise of 1850 The Compromise of 1850 was a proposed solution to the conflict over slavery in the new territories acquired in the Mexican-American War by Kentucky Senator Henry Clay. It consisted of laws that admitted California into the Union as a free state, the Fugitive Slave Act would be amended, the slave trade in Washington, D.C. would be abolished, a government created in Utah, and boundaries set between Texas and New Mexico. The Compromise of 1850 was first introduced at the Senate meeting in February 1850. The proposal brought about heavy debates from John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, and William Henry Seward. They were similar because each man loved and served their country and was passionate about their view of the issues of slavery and the new territories and believed their opinion was correct; however they were very different in what each believed to be fair and true. John C. Calhoun of South Carolina did not support The Compromise of 1850. He believed it was a betrayal to the south. He argued that the North and South were almost on equal grounds when the Constitution was ratified with an equal division of the States, but all of this was threatened by the Northern influence on government. Clay also argued that if Northerners wanted the south to stay in the Union they would have to stop in their attempts to limit slavery. Daniel Webster of Massachusetts supported The Compromise of 1850 proposed by Henry Clay of Kentucky. Webster was opposed to slavery personally, but believed that this compromise would save the Union. He stated that slavery could not be eradicated where it already existed, but should not be allowed to start in new territories. He urged the Northerners to accept the Southerners demands and abide by the Fugitive Slave act…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Metal Treatment

...oxides. Even a pin-head size of missed surface contamination will often compromise the bond between the coating and substrate. Therefore, prior to plating each work piece is subjected to a variety of detergents and acids with rinse tanks in between. As a result, production plating lines with 25 to30 chemical stations are common prior to the final plating tank where the desired coating is applied. Even with today’s advanced process control systems, the potential for a bond failure remains a constant concern for both the metal finishing house and the ultimate end user; as bond failures often lead to catastrophic failure of the work piece in downstream operations or in actual use. The B4C process protocol, by comparison, calls for washing the work piece with a mild solvent, alcohol, or soap and water to removed gross surface contaminates such as machining oil or soil in general. This entire preparation process is achieved in a single operation compared to the typical 25 to 30 tanks containing hazardous chemicals. Yet another concern is that coatings, by default, increase the dimensions of the work piece, thus forcing the manufacturers of close tolerance components to employ costly secondary machining operations to accommodate the added coating thickness leading to multiple levels of in-process inventories, special inspection processes, and complex assembly issues. B4C TECHNOLOGY: The B4C process, by comparison, is not a surface coating but rather a thermal chemical......

Words: 1843 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Colour Vision

...by which the perception of colour may be achieved. The theory was proposed by Young in 1802, based on a colour matching experiment in which participants had to match an arbitrary colour by mixing wavelengths of three lamps. The test lights were always primary colours. The target light was an arbitrary colour. Findings highlighted that the target light could only be achieved by mixing all three of the test lights. By mixing less than all 3, the target could not be achieved but by mixing 4 colours, uniqueness disappeared in that different matches could achieve same colour! From this, Young inferred that colour perception depends on three different types of cone receptors within the eye. Hermann von Helmholtz developed the theory further in 1850, and highlighted that the three types of cone photoreceptors could be classified as short-wavelength (S cones), middle-wavelength (M cones), and long-preferring (L cones). Trichromatic theory of colour vision proposes that colour is encoded by the ratio of firing patterns across the three cone receptor types, where S cones respond most strongly to short wavelength, M cones to medium wavelengths and so forth. In this essay the trichromatic theory of colour vision will be reviewed and evaluated in terms of how successful the theory is with regards to capturing both subjective and physiological aspects of colour vision. Certain aspects of colour vision that the theory can account for will be discussed, such as colour mixing, along with......

Words: 3777 - Pages: 16

Free Essay

Causes of Revolution

...|Revolution |Post your assignment as an attachment in Microsoft Word format to the “Assignments” link. | | | |Week Four: A New Nation | | |Details |Due |Points | |Objectives | | | | | |Compare and contrast the Articles of Confederation with the Constitution. | | | | |Summarize major debates and compromises that took place during the writing of the | | | | |Constitution. | | | |Reading |Read Ch. 7 of HIST2, Volume 1. | | | |Reading |Read this week’s Electronic Reserve Readings. | | | |Participation |Participate in class discussion. ......

Words: 5001 - Pages: 21

Free Essay

Strategic Management

...capital. • It is imperative to expect high standards of commercial performance from shipping interests. Not holding such high standards is not only value destroying; it can compromise energy companies’ primary strategic reasons for maintaining shipping capacity. THE GROWTH OF THE SHIPPING INDUSTRY ship, and the biggest supertankers can carry more than 3 million barrels of oil in a single load. Throughout this evolution, energy companies have stayed the course and have been instrumental in the development of the shipping industry. Historically, major energy companies owned and operated at least some portion of their own tanker fleets, as a result of their interest in controlling the supply chains of their core product. As the shipping industry evolved, numerous independent shipping companies entered the market alongside incumbent energy companies, offering a viable alternative to energy companies’ practice of owning and operating shipping assets. This maturity in shipping led to the natural commoditization not only of crude and refined product tanker shipping, but also of other trades, such as LNG shipping, that were once considered specialized. The shipping industry has evolved in step with the development of the oil industry, ever since the use of wooden barrels for oil transportation in the 1850s and the Nobel brothers’ creation of early models of the singlehull oil tanker in the late 1870s. The size of tankers has grown markedly since the middle of the 20th century:...

Words: 4610 - Pages: 19

Premium Essay

Healthcare

...been instrumental in shaping the current structure of medical services and how they are likely to shape its future. The evolutionary changes discussed here illustrate the American beliefs and values (discussed in Chapter 2) in action, within the context of broad social, political, and economic changes. Because social, political, and economic contexts are not static, their shifting influences lend a certain dynamism to the health care delivery system. Conversely, beliefs and values remain relatively stable over time. Consequently, in the American health care delivery experience, initiatives toward a national health care program have failed to make significant inroads. However, social, political, and economic forces have led to certain compromises, as seen in the creation of Medicare, Medicaid, and other public programs to extend health insurance to certain defined groups of people. Could major social or economic shifts eventually usher in a national health care system? It is anyone’s guess. Given the right set of conditions, a national health care system could become a reality in the United States, as recently seen with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010, which promises to reduce the number of uninsured by 32 million (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation 2011). Cultural beliefs and values are strong forces against attempts to initiate fundamental changes in the financing and 26501_CH03_FINAL.indd 82 delivery of health care. Therefore,......

Words: 18336 - Pages: 74

Premium Essay

Instiutions

...valuable enough to start with. We can also use the framework to structure our understanding of cases of economic success. Though such an http://www.rei.unipg.it/rei/article/view/14 2 REVIEW OF ECONOMICS AND INSTITUTIONS, Vol.1, Issue 2- Fall 2010, Article 1 ex post understanding is not a substitute for policy, it is the first step towards the goal of knowing how to reform institutions. 2 What Are Institutions? Douglass North (1990, p. 3) offers the following definition: “Institutions are the rules of the game in a society or, more formally, are the humanly devised constraints that shape human interaction.” Three important features of institutions are apparent in this definition: (1) that they are “humanly devised,” which contrasts with other potential fundamental causes, like geographic factors, which are outside human control; (2) that they are “the rules of the game” setting “constraints” on human behavior; (3) that their major effect will be through incentives (see also North, 1981). The notion that incentives matter is second nature to economists, and institutions, if they are a key determinant of incentives, should have a major effect on economic outcomes, including economic development, growth, inequality, and poverty. But do they? Are institutions key determinants of economic outcomes or secondary arrangements that respond to other, perhaps geographic or cultural, determinants of human and economic interactions? Much empirical research attempts to......

Words: 14840 - Pages: 60

Free Essay

Rivalries

...militarized disputes occurring within some prespecified interval of time. But this approach implies a number of analytical problems including the possibility that rivalry analyses are simply being restricted to a device for distinguishing between states that engage in frequent and infrequent conflict. An alternative approach defines rivalry as a perceptual categorizing process in which actors identify which states are sufficiently threatening competitors to qualify as enemies. A systematic approach to identifying these strategic rivalries is elaborated. The outcome, 174 rivalries in existence between 1816 and 1999 are named and compared to the rivalry identification lists produced by three dispute density approaches. The point of the comparison is not necessarily to assert the superiority of one approach over others as it is to highlight the very real costs and benefits associated with different operational assumptions. The question must also be raised whether all approaches are equally focused on what we customarily mean by rivalries. Moreover, in the absence of a consensus on basic concepts and measures, rivalry findings will be anything but additive even if the subfield continues to be monopolized by largely divergent dispute density approaches. The analysis of rivalry in world politics possesses some considerable potential for revolutionizing the study of conflict. Rather than assume all actors are equally likely to engage in conflictual relations, a......

Words: 18521 - Pages: 75

Free Essay

One Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. Explain the Impact This Change Has Made on Our Lives and Why It Is an Important Change.

...movement of rural agriculturalists to rapidly growing urban areas—but also the often-neglected displacements of populations that resulted from the wars, revolutions, and natural and man-made disasters of the twentieth century. Howard Spodek’s essay charts the development of the urban areas that have been the destination for the great majority of both international and domestic immigrants in the modern era, and that in 2005 became the place of residence for the majority of the world’s human population for the first time in history. He gives considerable attention to changes in city planning, patterns of urban growth, and important differences between industrialized Europe and North America and the developing world, as well as the contrasts in urban design and living conditions between different sorts of political regimes— communist, capitalist, colonial, and fascist. Particularly revealing are Spodek’s discussions of the influence of prominent urban planners and architects— including Le Corbusier and the Chicago School—urban preservation and the city as the locus of global cultural development, and the ways in which slums and shanty towns have morphed into long-term homes and viable communities for perhaps a majority of urban dwellers worldwide in the last half of the twentieth century. Broadly conceived and remarkably comprehensive, Bonnie Smith’s essay provides an overview of the gendering of political and social transformations over the course of the......

Words: 163893 - Pages: 656

Free Essay

Education and Income Inequality: a Meta-Regression Analysis

...(include) an observation in their dataset. To be accepted in their dataset, observations must be based on household surveys which include different types of income and cover most of the population (Deininger and Squire, 1996:568). With the accumulation of data, researchers have been able to use time series data rather than depending on cross sectional data, and many have used panel data in inequality studies including the relationship between education and inequality. Much empirical evidence suggesting a strong association between education and inequality has emerged since the seminal work of Mincer (1958). However, some of the evidence is contradictory. For example, Chiswick (1974) found that higher levels of schooling increase inequality. In contrast, Ahluwalia (1976) found a negative association between school enrolment and inequality. However, Ahluwalia‟s results vary according to the measures employed. Secondary schooling is positively related to the shares of the middle 40 percent and the lower income group, while an increase in the literacy rate is negatively associated with the income share of all income groups except the lowest 20 percent quintile. Winegarden (1979) also reports similar findings; education increases the income share of the bottom quintile income. More recent studies by Sylwester (2003) and Georgio (2003) find a negative relationship between higher education enrolment and inequality. However, they also find that education has less impact on inequality......

Words: 13666 - Pages: 55

Free Essay

Fascism

...profit.” These thoughts were shocking to Americans who were imbued with a strong religious tradition. At the same time, Paine’s ideas appealed to many Americans who were likewise steeped in the rationality of the Enlightenment period and who had difficulty aligning Calvinist doctrine with reason. Calvinism held that the essential nature of infants was evil. This belief was called “infant damnation.” Calvinism also subscribed to a belief that there were only a certain few who were “elect” by God from the beginning to be saved. All others were doomed after death regardless of their beliefs or actions in life. Many people objected to the ideas of infant damnation and the powerlessness of the individual to achieve salvation. Paine’s Deism, by contrast, claimed that human nature was essentially good and that salvation was within reach of every person through faith and good works. Deists believed in a “clockwork” universe. They felt that God had created the world and all the laws that governed it, and then He allowed events to play themselves out as they would without further divine intervention. Deists believed that the laws of the world are knowable to humanity by the application of logic and reason. This contrasted with the Calvinist idea that true knowledge is only obtained by divine revelation as expressed in the Bible. A number of the Founding Fathers, including Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, became Deists. A new Protestant sect, the Unitarians, formally expressed......

Words: 44275 - Pages: 178

Free Essay

Literary and Social Concerns in the Novels of William Thackeray and Charles Dickens

...amongst gentlefolks – and not with vulgar city people." This jibe refers to both the Sedleys and the Osbornes because George has thwarted her marriage with Joseph Sedley. She continues, "You might lodge all the people in Russell Square in the house, I think, and have space to spare." Becky succeeds in establishing herself in Vanity Fair, at the cost of the lives of two men and the alienation of all her friends and family. She serves as a direct contrast to Amelia. Exactly opposite from Rebecca, Amelia has many advantages. Miss Pinkerton describes her as industrious, obedient, sweet, and beloved. Whereas Rebecca's chief quality is ruthless ambition, Amelia exhibits weak humility and blind loyalty. Protected by doting parents, Amelia leads a sheltered existence saddened by George's neglect and his apparent willingness to forget her when her fortune has vanished. Sweet, lovable, refreshing, she has neither the sparkle nor the mentality of Becky. Amelia's innocence and ready belief in other people make her unbelievably good in contrast to Becky's unbelievable duplicity. Both attract young men, but for different reasons. Becky's wit and physical charm win a following, whereas Amelia's goodness and sweetness charm all who meet her. Becky can cry when she wants to; Amelia cries over a dead canary, a mouse, the end of a stupid novel, or the slightest unkind word to her. Thackeray has called this book a novel without a hero. Actually the only gentleman in the book is William......

Words: 12201 - Pages: 49

Premium Essay

The Rise of the Tale

...credibility. This shift is usually described in terms of a synthesis of two older short prose narrative forms: an amalgamation of traditional, orally-derived short narratives (tale, conte, Märchen, skazka, etc.) with the more polished Renaissance form of the novella (or nouvelle, Novelle, povest, etc.)—a predominantly literary mode, which lacks the popular oral history of the tale and which tends towards social observation while adhering more fully to realist conventions. There are several contending historical moments for this epoch in story-writing. Wendell Harris argues for the ‘arrival of the true short story in the 1880s and 1890s’ with the works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and H.G. Wells.5 Robert Marler cites the 1850s as the crux of any new conception of the genre, differentiating between the terms ‘tale’ and ‘short story’ in order to signal the change. Marler focuses on developments in America that he claims were driven by a shift in critical attitudes towards fictional moralising: ‘The ability to suggest, to evoke, without resorting to explanations was increasingly praised. Tacked-on moral tags became a sign of mediocrity.’6 Charles May goes further back in time and argues that the expansive literary treatment of Märchen (wonder or fairy tales) by German writers provides one starting point for the modern short story. May aligns Marler’s tale-versus-short story dynamic with another two terms—‘fable’ and ‘exemplum’—and claims......

Words: 98420 - Pages: 394

Premium Essay

Sociology

... | |ageism |Prejudice and discrimination against people on the basis of age. | |agencies of socialisation |Agencies of socialisation are social institutions which form part of the process of | | |passing on to people the norms and values of their society. It is from agencies of | | |socialisation that we learn how to act in the way that others expect of us. | |agency |Self-motivated behaviour. This is in contrast to behaviour shaped by wider structures we | | |belong to and which act to influence how we behave. | |agenda setting |Maxwell E. McCombs and Donald L. Shaw used the term agenda setting to discuss the way in | | |which the media can decide for people which things they should worry about by reporting | | |some stories more than others | |agents of social control |Agencies of social control are social......

Words: 22530 - Pages: 91

Premium Essay

Late Development

...of Sussex Library] at 03:33 31 August 2011 Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the political economy of late capitalist development Ben Selwyn Abstract The study of late capitalist development is often characterized as a battle between protagonists of market-led versus state-led development. For the latter position, Alexander Gerschenkron looms large, as one of the most significant theorists of stateled development under conditions of relative backwardness. There are striking similarities between Gerschenkron’s explication of the advantages of backwardness and Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development and the privilege of backwardness. (These similarities have been commented upon often but rarely subject to closer comparison.) Indeed, both men share a common problematic Á the comprehension of how economically backward countries could skip stages of development in order to join the ranks of economically advanced countries. This article compares their conception of this problematic and illustrates how in a number of areas the two are complementary. These are: their rejection of unilinear patterns of capitalist development, their appreciation of the role of states and institutions in facilitating late development and their understanding of development as a disruptive social process. However, in crucial areas the two diverge. These are: their comprehension of international economic and political relations, the role and position of labour in late......

Words: 14030 - Pages: 57

Premium Essay

Marxist

...credibility. This shift is usually described in terms of a synthesis of two older short prose narrative forms: an amalgamation of traditional, orally-derived short narratives (tale, conte, Märchen, skazka, etc.) with the more polished Renaissance form of the novella (or nouvelle, Novelle, povest, etc.)—a predominantly literary mode, which lacks the popular oral history of the tale and which tends towards social observation while adhering more fully to realist conventions. There are several contending historical moments for this epoch in story-writing. Wendell Harris argues for the ‘arrival of the true short story in the 1880s and 1890s’ with the works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and H.G. Wells.5 Robert Marler cites the 1850s as the crux of any new conception of the genre, differentiating between the terms ‘tale’ and ‘short story’ in order to signal the change. Marler focuses on developments in America that he claims were driven by a shift in critical attitudes towards fictional moralising: ‘The ability to suggest, to evoke, without resorting to explanations was increasingly praised. Tacked-on moral tags became a sign of mediocrity.’6 Charles May goes further back in time and argues that the expansive literary treatment of Märchen (wonder or fairy tales) by German writers provides one starting point for the modern short story. May aligns Marler’s tale-versus-short story dynamic with another two terms—‘fable’ and ‘exemplum’—and claims......

Words: 98420 - Pages: 394