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Coping with Hiv

In: Social Issues

Submitted By msshannicole
Words 914
Pages 4
Coping with HIV/AIDS in the Western NY Area
Shantele Garner
HCA430: Special Populations
Vicki Sowle
March 19, 2012

Certain exposures and conditions can produce a higher risk of HIV infections than others. Those exposures include, but are not limited to, sharing needles to inject drugs, receptive unprotected anal intercourse and vaginal intercourse. It’s very important that programs are put into place to educate communities of the risks involved concerning this illness. There are several programs in the Western NY, or Buffalo, NY area that addresses the needs and demands of the HIV/AIDS population. These programs are put into place to provide intense counseling, treatment options, coping mechanisms and other concerns involving the infected without prejudice and discrimination. One very well-known program in the Buffalo, NY area is called the Aids Community Services of WNY (Evergreen Health Services of WNY). Evergreen Health services is a not for profit community based organization committed to ending the AIDS epidemic and minimizing its effects in the eight counties of Western New York (Evergreen Health Services, 2007). This organization has been providing a wide range of services that assist with the daily living of those infected since 1983. One service provided is medical care. There are different types of medical care offered by this organization including primary care, this is sensitive and caters to the needs of the population served. The medical staff also specializes in the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-sexual and transgendered health care. Other specialized medical services include Medical care coordination which ensures the patients receive the proper follow-up care such as nutritional assessments, substance abuse and mental health interventions, treatment adherence support and prevention education. Aids community services also provide different...

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