Corruption in Healthcare Services in India

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Submitted By AroraNeha
Words 1508
Pages 7
Health care services in India are facing different challenges from inadequate finance and poor management to inequity in terms of quality and access (Ramani-Mavalankar, 2006). However, corruption is that underlying problem, which if not tackled, would prevent from resolving all other kinds of difficulties (Potter, 2003). Therefore, in this essay I have endeavoured to understand the forms in which corruption is prevalent in Indian Healthcare Services. Along with this, I have also tried to suggest certain measures which would help tackle corruption.
The former president of Medical Council of India, Mr.Ketan Desai has been charged with corruption both the times he has been elected for the post. Despite his removal in 2001 following the charges, he was re-elected by the Government of India in 2009 (Pandya 2009). Thereafter in 2011 Mr Desai was arrested by the CBI for accepting a highly culpable amount of bribe from two medical colleges seeking recognition. (Chauhan, 2011). Mr Desai justifies the definition of corruption by Transparency International, as the result of misused powers to benefit personally instead of doing public welfare (Vian, 2007). Moreover, this definition would be appropriate for the Government of India who elected a person with history of fraud to be the president of the central health governing body of the nation.
Health sector, in any nation, is a vast network involving different participants at each stage ( Hussmann,2011). Therefore it becomes difficult to actively regulate and monitor each of these participants. In India, particularly, the dysfunctional government (Mahajan, 2010) and people’s attitudes (Hussmann, 2011) are the main causes behind the present trend of corruption. Indian Government has been proven inefficient time and again in mitigating corruption. For instance, in January 2008, the Health Secretary of India responded to a…...

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