Free Essay

Cowboys and Indians

In: Novels

Submitted By Matiasow
Words 995
Pages 4
Section B
Write a summary of Cowboys and Indians in about 150 words.
In the beginning of the novel, we hear about the environment in which the narrator comes from. She is from a small town, and she has come home to participate in her grandmother’s funeral, even though she now lives in a big city on the east coast.

The narrator does not feel she fits in with the rest of the family at the funeral preparations; therefore, she calls her cousin David. Together they drive fast through the city, ignoring the red traffic lights until they reach a bar where they drink.

Afterwards they run to a hillside to watch the sunset. On the slope, she sits and think; David will never be able to understand the admiration she has had for her grandmother. They sit on the cliff and watch as the sun sets while smoking marihuana-cigarettes. Then they move, to get something to eat.

As the narrator and David goes to a takeaway stall to get some food, they encounter some Indian women who talks to them. They say that they have brought the devils wind with them. David is frightened of it while the narrator is not affected.

When they are at her grandmother’s house again, they say goodbye.
(199 words)

Characterize the narrator.
The narrator is a very reflective person. She thinks of small details that make her reflect about existential questions and come up with big considerations about life. “He would never think of them as accomplishments; he would never be expected to perform any of them, or even to try. It’s expectation that’s so crushing sometimes, I think” (p. 10, l. 95-97) She thinks about all the things her grandmother had accomplished. She managed to take care of five children, while taking various jobs. She says it is something that David will never be able to understand because there is not that kind of expectations to him.
She feels torn in several ways. She grew up in a small town where her family still lives, but she moved to a larger city on the east coast. She is now an adult and is therefore responsible for several things at her grandmother's funeral, but she still feels like a teenager. On one hand, she is wild and rebellious like her cousin David, and on the other hand, she is a very reflective person who thinks about things and admire her grandmother's life as a housewife. She tries to maintain a facade - to play hard, but deep down she is not so tough.
Comment on similarities and differences between David and the narrator.
David has been the narrator’s role model as the “wild rebel”, when she was little, and he still is. He has been a soldier during the Gulf War, and has a wild attitude and live a hard life. He is like an outlaw who does what suits him.
Similarities
Their grandfather, who was the patriarch of the family, looked askance at them both, and it binds them together - they are both outsiders. She feels that they have something in common with both being "the black sheep" in the family.
“We are the black sheep of the family, and we understand this about each other. Our grandfather, the patriarch of the family, despised us both” (p. 8, l. 56-58)
What the narrator and David also have in common is that they both feel in doubt about their position in the family. Now that both her grandfather, who did not care about either the narrator or David, and her grandmother, who conversely, sought to integrate them into the family, are dead, they do not really know where they are.
“Our grandmother tried failingly to make up for it. Now they’re both dead, and we’re not really sure where that leaves us.” (p. 8, l. 58-59)
Differences
The fact that narrator is ordering tequila instead of Margaritas at the bar, shows that he has trained her well. It shows that he is somehow her teacher. There is in this sense a difference between the two, because David is more experienced and more trained to be a rebel than she is.
“David raised his eyebrows. ‘I thought you well,’ he says.” (p. 9, l. 70)
Despite the narrator has a rebellious side and have looked up to his cousins David lifestyle, his huge rebelliousness and radically wild attitude still is more wild and rebellious than hers. She has just acquired a portion of his attitude. We see the difference between them in the way that he is wilder than she is.
“David screams rebellion, always has. As a kid, he embodied to me all that was wild in the world” (p. 7, ll. 18-19)
Write a short essay (150-200 words) in which you discuss what makes a person an outsider.
I think you can be “the black sheep” in many contexts, but it is never fun to be the outsider. When you are the outsider, you could be standing outside a group, which you want to be a part of.
As the outsider, there are always things that you cannot be privy to because, to belong in a group, means that you will be a part of all the things that are being talked about, among the people who are in the group. As the outsider, you are automatically being pushed into the background.
However, I believe that being the outsider has become a negatively charged word, but it does not have to. Being the outsider means standing outside, next to or just feel left out, and it may be a good thing. You could have chosen to stand outside for several reasons. It could be that you think it is boring to be like everyone else. If you choose to be the outsider, it does not have to mean anything negative, but instead it can be a sign of independence.
(181 words)

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Cowboys and Indians

...Introduction Gordon Sinclair’s book “Cowboys and Indians: The Shooting of J.J. Harper” is the author’s account of a Native man’s fatal encounter with police and the aftermath for years to follow. The book opens with a description of the incident where J.J. Harper was killed, and flows into the subsequent police investigation of one of their own members. The resulting court proceedings, inquiries, and inquests are examined where Sinclair cites witness testimony, evidence and exhibits, media stories, and his personal interviews with police and civilians involved. This essay will examine a series of analytical questions in response to the book including the main point and underlying themes, suggestions given by the title, content regarding Aboriginal/police relationships, the author’s attempt at a moral lesson and finally evidence of heavy bias shown by the author. The reason I have identified this book as “the author’s account” rather than “the true account” of the story is because Sinclair’s personal bias shines through nearly every page of this book. Many crucial details have been omitted because they would be oppressive to the Indian perspective and give credibility to the fact that the cowboys acted lawfully in eliminating the threat of Harper. This bias will be further examined later. Background The book opens with a detailed description of the early hours of March 9, 1988 where Winnipeg Police Service (WPS) members were involved in the pursuit of a stolen vehicle.......

Words: 1508 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Cowboys and Indians

...Cowboys and Indians 1. “Cowboys and Indians” is a short story written by Lorien Crow in 2008. We are in New Mexico; it’s a warm day in February. The narrator is a young girl/woman, and she is at her grandmother’s funeral. She is old enough to attend this funeral as an adult, and she is expected to be there to shake hands with the last people leaving. But she still feels like a teenager that needs to escape. This longing to escape drives her to call her rebellion cousin, David. Together they ride on his Ducati. David is half outlaw – half Indian. After a stop at a local bar, they decide to watch the sunset up in the bluffs. As the sun goes down, they start to talk about their grandmother and her life. We hear about David’s quilt, we get to know her thoughts about their grandmother’s life and we start to notice the difference between them. 2. The narrator is no longer a teenager, but not a completely adult yet. David is her idol. She looks up to him, she feels protected and safe with him, and at some point she wants to be like him. He amazes her, scares her and challenges her. When she thinks about her grandmother, she believes that she had a full life. She understands the great meaning of hard work and she has a great respect towards her grandmother for all the work she did throughout her whole life. She, like David, is the black sheep of the family – hated by the dead grandfather. She doesn’t appear to be an ordinary girl. She has some half-vanished nail polish, but......

Words: 1105 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Cowboys and Indians

...English B - Higher Preparatory Examination Section B) 1. Summary of “Cowboys and Indians” by Lorien Crow: The narrator’s Grandma Ellen is dead, and they are on their way to the funeral. The narrator is surprised over the respect for the death, because she has not experienced it in the East, where she is from. The respect is shown in a way of people bowing their heads while they drive by. She is preparing the funeral feast and thanks the attending people, but she does not feel like being there. She phones her cousin, David as an escape plan. He arrives in the late afternoon on a motorbike and asks her what she would like to do. Her answer is; margaritas, and then they take off. She wrote letters to him about her life as a fourteen-year-old-girl. They go to a bar and drink tequilas. Afterwards they drive to the bluffs to watch the sunset. However, they are speaking of how their family thinks of them, and they agree on being the black sheep. After a delightful sunset, David drives his cousin back to the funeral feast. 2. Characterization of the narrator: * David thinks that his cousin is his favorite cousin, because she did not feel bad for him during the Gulf War. (page 8, line 29-30) * She feels like a black sheep in her family (page 8, line 56) * She loves her cousin. (page 7,line 13-14) * When David asks her what she wants to do, he does it with a Native American twinge, which sounds Canadian to her pale, untrained ear. (page 7, line 21-22) ...

Words: 644 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Cowboys and Indians

...Cowboys and Indians Summary: In the beginning the short story takes place at a funeral where the narrator’s grandmother, Ellen, is about to be buried. Afterwards the narrator goes to her grandmother’s house where she later meets her cousin, David, and decides to take a ride on his motorbike to find bar nearby to get a drink. David is adopted by the narrator’s uncle and has therefore made up a story about him being related to outlaws. After getting a drink they decide to go see the sunset, where they talk about their grandmother’s life, and suddenly David starts to think of his life and how he wants to get away from where he lives. They get hungry and find a nearby take out stand by the highway. At the stand they meet two native-American looking women. David says that the wind is picking up, and one of the women reply by that the wind brings devil spirits with it, and refers to David as a devil spirit. David doesn’t take their words kindly and both he and the narrator decide to go back, and from there they split up. The narrator: We don’t get a name of the narrator but when they get to the bar we find out that she is a female in the sentence: “I’m the only female in the place”. We don’t get her exact age either but to me it seems like she is in her post-teenage years around 17-19 years. The narrator got 2 different kinds of personalities. When she’s with David she´s comfortable, relaxed and stops thinking about all the bad things in her mind. She´s no insurgent at......

Words: 777 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Myth of the Cowboy

...Reality Eclipsing Romance The American Cowboy, by reason of his picturesqueness, was a prime subject for entertainments like the Wild West show. However, the limitations of popular entertainment caused William Cody to stress the cowboy’s attractive charm to the exclusion of other qualities. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, formed in 1883 and lasting until 1913, romanticized versions of a time and place, and shaped the myth of the Wild West, including the glamorized image of the cowboy. When the world spun into the twentieth century, millions of people believed they recalled the American Wild West because “they had seen it, full of life and color, smoking guns and galloping horses, presided over by the most recognizable celebrity of his day: William F. Cody, or Buffalo Bill.” Spectators accepted the vivid personal memories that the Wild West show generated as historical truth. Although William F. Cody claimed that the motive behind Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show was to preserve “The Great West that Was,” his dramatized and inaccurate portrayals belied the true portrait of the American Cowboy to the public. At one time or another, William Cody performed the duties of a U.S. Army Scout, Indian Fighter, rancher, businessman, and world-renowned entertainer, but still, Cody never actually worked as a cowboy. Cody claimed that he staged his memories, “in the hope of giving permanent form to the history of the Plains” However, he contradicts this claim with his account of the......

Words: 2825 - Pages: 12

Free Essay

The Frontier Myth

...up huge numbers of cattle for ranchers. Cowboys wasn't just for anyone. Certain character traits and physical characteristics were required if someone wanted to be a good cowboy. Considering the distances that they covered, traveling was rough. Cowboy needed great strength, endurance, and often cleverness to complete. People came from everywhere to become cowboys. Some came from eastern American states, others from the Midwest, and the rest came from states in the South. They came to work on ranches and drive cattle on the trail. "Many were ex-rebel soldiers who maintained that attitude on the trail. This is how Texas got a reputation for lawlessness and violence" (The Cowboys). Being a cowboy, for some, had a special status. Cowboys in the Western Plains called themselves cowpunchers and thought of themselves as more important than others. Cowboys worked very hard and were also a big part of pushing the frontier further West. After the Civil War, the frontier changed just like the rest of America. Immigrants established from all over the globe. This led to huge population increases, which meant that more land was needed. Bigger population meant bigger nature problems because the Americans interacted with the native and the wilderness. The frontier was slowly divided among the masses, and people began claiming their areas. With the land being devoured, the Indians felt that they were being denied the rights to what was theirs. The Indians were greatly outnumbered, and out......

Words: 855 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Development of the Western Frontier

...region to connect the western part to the east. The west began to transform because of these advancements. These small regions grew and surrounded the Indians. The presence of the variety of communities led to the rise of political concerns. The Indians settled, in part of the frontier, and took their trading activities beyond Mississippi towards the mountains. The development of infrastructure that followed the expanding movements even beyond the rocky mountains led to even greater migrations into the far west. These settlements at different times led to the establishment of frontiers until the present frontier, which are the Rocky Mountains. The establishment of these frontiers also involved the Indians in wars. Each frontier established different developments, and they were important for the development of the country to some extent. However, when Americans moved into the West, restoring their land, what used to be frontiers became the United States of America. Turner’s thesis has some problems and critics dismissed some of his assumptions. They have denied the idea that the democracy of America is wholly tied to the frontier. They suggest that other contributions were from slavery, industrial capitalism, civil wars and immigration. Some, on the other hand, have dismissed the notion of a frontier being free land. Indian wars disrupted by the nations move seconded Turner’s consideration that the American frontier was a dispute of some of European nation’s borders......

Words: 1116 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Imaging Indians

... Imaging Indians Name: Institution Date: Hollywood is one of the most influential entities in the world. This industry shapes the perception of movie viewers in every aspect of their lives. In Hollywood movies, Americans and Indians are the key players as a result of their long interaction in the history of America. Therefore, Hollywood movies greatly affect the perceptions of the Americans and other audiences about Indians. In most cases, Hollywood stereotype Indians as savages, as well as primitives. They portray Indians as vicious and dangerous people headed for extinction. Even with the production of Indians and western films, this wrong perception of Indians still remains in the mind of many movie audiences (Aleiss, 35). The Native American has experienced extensive damage from mass media in the way it portrays cowboys and their process of moving in the west. These cowboys moved across the west conquering the lands while riding the horses. In real sense, they were driving the Indians out (Mihelich, 130). This example points out at some of the cultural misconceptions created by the Hollywood. The conception of the movie by young Americans is inaccurate, as well as highly damaging. This misconception especially in young children makes it difficult for them to learn about the Native Americans of the present days (O'Connor, 72). The stereotype on Indians has also affected the Indians in America. Many of them suffer from self-esteem deficiency caused by the......

Words: 401 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Business

...of the experience. Real-life characters such as William F. Cody ("Buffalo Bill") and James Butler Hickok ("Wild Bill" Hickok) as well as a number of fictional characters were extremely popular. While many early western movies told moral tales of good triumphing over evil and men fighting for a righteous cause some were also comedies and others merely action packed showcases for their smart horses and talented "cowboy" actors. Films like "Custer’s Last Fight" in 1912, "On the Night Stage" in 1914, "Hell's Hinges" in 1916, and "Tumbleweeds" in 1925 were well received. Certainly films about the west have focused on cowboys, gunslingers, and male roles in general, with women taking more minor roles. Some early films however did provide a view of the west from the perspective of women. "The Wind" from 1928 was an example with a focus on Lillian Gish's struggle with the isolation and hardship. Although few of the more well known western films were "sympathetic" regarding Indians, some silent westerns did indeed recognize the culture of Native American Indians and displayed some of the issues related to their treatment by the US government. Richard Dix starred in 1925-26's "The Vanishing American" as well as 1929's "Redskin", both recognized as important films in this respect despite the fact that many modern fans have not viewed them. Western movies about real figures such as Billy the Kid, Buffalo Bill, and others continued to be made although their tales were......

Words: 851 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Almost Inpossible

...effect in those movies. I remember us playing cowboys and Indians and I always wanted to be on the cowboys side because whoever was on the Indians side was always going to lose just as they did in the movies. It wasn’t till recently that I looked at those pictures in a different point view a different lens if you would say. Native Americans still to this day are depicted as negative stereotypes through main stream media. Films such as Windtalkers, Flags of our Fathers, The new World, and Bury my heart at wounded Knee show how Hollywood movies still depicts the stereotypes that Native Americans are still inferior, Savages, people needing a White Savior to progress in the word. The first way Hollywood stereotypes Native Americans is portraying them as inferior to whites. For example in the movie Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee the scene where the senetors and congress men are determining what to do with the indigenous peoples land. Without having any insight of the Native Americans. It isn’t until later in the movie when they get a native man to cosign on the plans they have set out to put the Sioux tribe on reservations that are divided and sold to white Americans. There is also another scene where the senator and the general are talking to the president and the general says “I’ll say it till my tongue bleeds if we’re ever going to claim what we bought from the French and whoop the Mexicans for its going to mean killing Indians.” It shows how white superiority is based on......

Words: 401 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Cowboy Culture-a Saga of Five Centuries

...Cowboy Culture-A Saga of Five Centuries Essay Question One The cowboys rounded up cattle, so this is a good place to introduce the three types cattle brought to America by the Spanish. One was identified by its irregular and asymmetrical color spots around the neck and ears, the Spanish called it the “Berrenda.” Another breed was the Retinto, meaning dark brown in color. The third type of cattle came from Andalusia region, which was blackish in color and was better recognized as the Andalusian fighting bull. While the Andalusian was for bull fighting, the other two were for herding. These livestock with their very long horns eventually became part of Texas culture, better known as the Texas Longhorn. With numerous cattle roaming the countryside, the cattlemen had to come up with a way to identify their herds and protect them from potential loss and theft. The branding iron was established by the Spanish cowboys, they would place the poker in hot coals to heat the end of the iron, then inscribe on the hide a permanent marking, which showed ownership of their livestock. It was common for the vaquero to round up all the strays and to mark them as his own. “Centuries later this practice would be called “mavericking,” first in Texas, then elsewhere in the American West”(pg. 13). To prevent cattle issues among the Spanish and Indians, the creation of a cattlemen organization called the Mesta was formed. “The Mesta was to become the granddaddy of all organized......

Words: 622 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Birth of a Nation

...both misunderstood outlaws with a heart of gold. We all know John Wayne is the ultimate cowboy and Cleavon Little is still virtually unknown; but if the characters have the same characteristics, should they not be on the same level of importance? I personally believe that a black cowboy does not get the same respect as a white cowboy. I believe that is due to what people imagine a cowboy should be. I could also use Clint Eastwood to back this statement up. You think of cowboy, you automatically think of Eastwood and Wayne, which puts them on a pedestal. My personal favorite scene in the movie is when Taggart and Lamarr are getting villains to help out with their plan. The KKK is a presence in this movie, but they have the saying “Have a nice day” on the back of their sheets. Later on, when Black Bart is shown by Waco Kid, Bart says “where the white women at?” It is the reason that this movie is actually famous and is also another stereotype, a funny one. The bad guys in this movie are rich white guys, which is common in movies today, but not so much during the Birth of a Nation era. Taggart and Lamarr try to come up with a plan to get everyone out of Rock Ridge. One of the suggestions is to kill the first born male child in every household. The reply is, “that’s too Jewish.” That is a very offensive statement, but people still laugh at it because it is stereotypical and atypical. The Indians in the film are called children and are given toys in exchange for their land.......

Words: 1325 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Resort Management

...attraction which was the Cowboy Town. Live up by its name, the Cowboy Town was the visionary of the founder to relive the era of the Wild Wild West. The daily fireworks during its Carnival had been a normality for the locals. Up to today, A’Famosa Resort is known as a holiday destination; a must-place-to visit in Malacca. Visitors had been visiting this place for different purpose. Be it for conference, family day, picnics or even your wedding. You’ll find this place as a hidden gem awaiting to be discover. A'Famosa Water World Which occupies a land area of 20 acres is the only water theme park of its kind in the southern region of this country and comprises of slides and pools of every kind. The park has lots of interesting and unique features such as choices of water slides - all designed to suit even the most sophisticated water enthusiasts. Kids will find the Arabian Village and Kid's Adventure Pool an exciting adventure. For those looking for excitement, take up the challenge by trying out our Seven Storey High Speed Slide. Feel the adrenaline rush through your head as you slide down. Less daring souls can try out the Wave Pool, Family Raft Ride and the longest Lazy River in the world. A'Famosa COWBOY TOWN Experience a journey back in time to the good old days of Jesse James, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid when you step into the resort's latest attraction, COWBOY TOWN. Occupying a land area of 5 acres, the Cowboy Town......

Words: 1040 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Work

... The Long Drive: Link the points together to show reasons for the development of the Long Drive. |Due to the American Civil War many cowboys went off to fight for the | |Cattle in Texas reproduced and when the cowboys returned there were 5 million| |south against the north. | |cattle. | | | | | |Demand for beef in the East meant that cattle could be sold for $50 | |Homesteaders stopped cattlemen who tried to drive their cattle across the | |per head as opposed to $5 in Texas. | |Plains. They did not want their animals catching Texas fever or their crops | | | |damaged. | | | | | |Charles Goodnight and his business partner, Oliver Loving drove a | |The construction of the Transcontinental Railway (completed 1869) solved this| |cattle herd up to a US army fort to sell beef. This journey led......

Words: 974 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Reel Injun

...rarely. Films would show Indian men riding and fighting while horse back riding and this was something that the average white person was not accustomed to, neither be the Native Americans. People that were not ethnic would go to films and watch as these silent films with Indians acting as heroes and it made being Native American something that the white man wanted to be. This fantasy came from films making them seem as if they were noble savages fighting off people in the desert. Being an “Indian” was something that symbolized peaceful people having unity and family in their everyday lives and these values were good for children to see in film. Indian Guides emerged as a group of American fathers and sons throughout America acting as Native Americans teaching their kids how to be just people. Suddenly through the emergence of the cowboy in film, Indians became the bad people and this changed the stereotype of having red skin as something bad and shunned. Native Americans became props in film and they were no longer distinguishable giving them any individual identity, just a race. White Americans started to play the roles of Indians in Hollywood screenings and the public started to believe that these people did not exist anymore. The emergence of the iconic American cowboy in John Wayne was something that made Native Americans even more angry with Hollywood films because it embodied the traits of an unstoppable American rebel killing Indians and we were proud of this....

Words: 1006 - Pages: 5