Credit Risk Analysis System of Standard Chartered Bank

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CREDIT RISK ANALYSIS SYSTEM OF STANDARD CHARTERED BANK





by





Abdullah Bin Haroon
ID: 2003210001013








An Internship Report Presented in Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for the
Bachelor of Business
Administration


















SOUTHEAST UNIVERSITY, BANGLADESH

October 2005



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix


CHAPTER

1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Origin of the report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.3 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
4. Limitations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
5. Methodology
1. Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2. Primary source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Secondary source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4. Sample Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5. Data Collection Method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
6. Data Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
6. Company Profile
1. Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2. History Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3. Acquisition of ANZ Grindlays
Bank by Standard Chartered Bank. . . . . . . . . . 7
4.…...

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