Criminal Justice Case Study

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Robbery case study

I have chosen to write about the robbery case. The synopsis of the case is: Two people, after conducting some surveillance on a small shoe store robbed a man while he was transporting money from his business to the bank. The two people later identified as Bertha Bloutt and William Bloutt, used the ruse of a broken down vehicle to get the victim to stop to render assistance at which time the robbed him at gun point. The usual process that these two offenders would go through is known as the criminal justice process. The criminal justice system is comprised of three major institutions which process a case from inception, through trial, to punishment. A case begins with law enforcement officials, who investigate a crime and gather evidence to identify and use against the presumed perpetrator. The case continues with the court system, which weighs the evidence to determine if the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. If so, the corrections system will use the means at their disposal, namely incarceration and probation, to punish and correct the behavior of the offender. Throughout each stage of the process, constitutional protections exist to ensure that the rights of the accused and convicted are respected. These protections balance the need of the criminal justice system to investigate and prosecute criminals with the fundamental rights of the accused (who are presumed innocent). Though a number of rights derived from the Constitution protect the accused from abuses and overreaching from law enforcement officers, the arguably most important of these rights are the Miranda advisement and the Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures. Miranda rights are the familiar refrain of police dramas. "You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be held against you in the court of law. You…...

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