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Criminal Law and Ins Effects on Societies Youth

In: Social Issues

Submitted By dragamon157
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Police departments are the most ever-present organization in any society. Policemen are the most visible representatives of the government. In their hour of need and when there is no one to help, citizens will almost always seek help from the police. Members of the police department are supposed to be the most approachable representatives of the government of the day. In cases of accidents, disasters or criminal activity, the police department is always the first to be informed. The major roles of the police departments in any society include: maintenance and enforcement of the law, maintenance of order and service.
It is the function of the police department to maintain and enforce the laws of the land. To this end, policemen are expected to uphold the law as well as to enforce it impartially and without bias. It is the function of the police department to protect citizens’ lives, property and integrity. Police departments have the function of protecting the human rights and liberty of the members of the public. They are also charged with the responsibility of creating a feeling of security in the community. As part of law enforcement, policemen maintain records of all criminal activities reported to them. They are also expected to investigate these criminal activities, identify and apprehend the perpetrators.
The other major function of the police departments is the maintenance of order in the community. This entails maintenance of peace and prevention of activities that might potentially disturb others. To this end, policemen facilitate orderly movement of motor vehicles, as well as people. In maintenance of order, the major role of the police is the prevention of violation of the law. Responding to distress calls and resolving conflict are function of the police that help in the maintenance of order. It is also the duty of the police to aid people in danger of…...

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