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Criminal Law

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Criminal Law Paper Humberto Camacho CJA/354 Criminal Law July 13, 2015 Instructor Peter Lukevich

Criminal Law Paper
A recent Supreme Court Case that was decided was ARIZONA et al. v. UNITED STATES. This case was argued on April, 25, 2012 and a decision was made on June 25, 2012. This case came about in 2010 when the state of Arizona enacted a statute known as S.B. 1070. This statute addresses the large number of illegal aliens that are in the state of Arizona. “Fed up with illegal immigrants crossing from Mexico -- and what they say is the federal government's inability to stop it -- legislators in Arizona passed the tough immigration law in 2010. The federal government sued, saying that Arizona overreached.”
I have been interested in this case since hearing about it. The first thing that actually came to my mind was racial profiling. I understand that the United States has a huge problem on their hands attempting to control this problem. It was interesting to me to see a state attempt to make a state law that would supersede federal law. As a police officer myself, I can see this becoming a racial profiling issue. Without certain guidelines in place, this would lead to many unanswered questions. The state that I reside in is Georgia. Georgia also has a high population of immigrants, so I am curious as to how this will turnout in the end and affect other states.
According to "Supreme Court Of The United States " (2012), “The primary purpose of the law is to discourage and deter the unlawful entry and presence of aliens and economic activity by persons unlawfully present in the United States. The primary jurisdiction would be any law enforcement officer sworn to uphold the laws in the State of Arizona. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the majority opinion. Arizona may have understandable frustrations with the problems caused by illegal...

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