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Cultural Syncretism

In: English and Literature

Submitted By markd32
Words 2476
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The Migration of Cultures
Tracey Percifield, Penny Rogers, Cheryl Halford, Nate Conley and Amber Wirth
American Intercontinental University

Abstract
In knowing how people of the past decades lived we must examine the past and study many things they left behind. By understanding how they lived and what impact they had as they migrated to the New World, it is then we understand how they lived and understand what the environment was like. Looking at the impact that immigrants had and brought to the New World we see what cultures and food dishes they brought to our civilization.

The Migration of Cultures By 1830 the United States consisted of 2.3 million out of 12.8 million were of African descent and upon them settling after being brought here from Africa they brought many traditions and impacted the culture today. When they came to the United States they brought scientific and technological systems from the West and Central Africa as well as many food dishes such as; gumbo and rice, millet, sorghum, watermelon and black-eyed peas. They also brought tradition with them regarding funerals, celebration festivals, arts, music, dugout canoes, the banjo and language which also had an effect on the European culture as well and this is known as Africanism (Nps.gov, n.d.). Africanism is directly related to African American and Creolization which asks the question when you stop and give to the American or European culture. They point out that the African culture has direct impact on Africa, African-American, Creolization, African-Jamaican and European cultures and when examine the roots trace back to Africa. However, there has been some controversial stating that African roots to America were long lost in slavery as some believe but state the only strong culture they have still impacted are Latin America and the Caribbean (Nps.gov, n.d.). Many have...

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