Free Essay

Dear Abby Unit 3

In: People

Submitted By jfranse2
Words 2313
Pages 10
Instructions
Respond to three letters from each chapter. Draw information from the chapter while formulating your response; use correct terms and definitions. Reference information you use from the textbook by citing the page number. If you use information from outside the textbook, make sure it is credible and generally supported by the medical and scientific community. Avoid anecdotal evidence or opinion. Your written responses should be 2200-2500 cumulatively, or about four to five pages single-spaced (including the original Dear Abby Letter).

| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|My three-year-old is driving me crazy! He is so picky! He will only wear certain clothes. He is a very picky eater. I wonder if he is eating |
|enough. He’s getting much thinner and doesn't eat as much as he did when he was younger. This morning, he had a fit because I gave him a new |
|toothbrush that was a different color than his old one. Have I done something to make him so picky? What should I do to prevent him from |
|becoming a spoiled brat? |
| |
|Picky Problems in Plainsville (Chapter 8, Letter 1) |
| |
|Dear Picky Problems in Plainsville, |
| |
|Don’t worry, your child is just going through what is called the “just right” stage. The “just right” stage is a stage in your child’s |
|development that they want things done the exact same way all of the time. It is completely normal for him to freak out when things change. |
|This is nothing you have done and is something that you shouldn’t mind obliging, as long as it is harmless things. If he only wants to eat ice|
|cream that would be something you need to change. As far as what you should do, you should feed him healthy food and go along with his wanting|
|the same color toothbrush and same clothes. He will eventually grow out of this at about age 6 (pg. 228-229). It is also normal for children |
|your son’s age to eat less than when they were younger. Their bodies don’t use up as much as they use to. So as long as your son is eating |
|healthy, he will be just fine (pg. 227). |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|My son is almost four years of age and can’t tie his own shoes. He’ll be going to school soon and I’m worried that his poor fine motor skills |
|will be a problem. He still draws stick figures that are nothing more than a head with arms and legs attached. He can kick a ball and loves to|
|ride his tricycle, but can’t hop on one foot very well. He also has trouble with art projects that use scissors. Sometimes he doesn’t even |
|know which hand to use. He often uses both hands when coloring with crayons. Would it be wrong for me to encourage him to use his right hand? |
|What is developmentally appropriate for children his age? Are boys slower at developing fine motor skills than are girls? |
| |
|Ambidextrous in Alabama (Chapter 8, Letter 3) |
| |
|Dear Ambidextrous, |
| |
|Your son is perfectly fine. He has developed his gross motor skills but is still developing his fine motor skills. These will keep developing |
|as long as he keeps practicing. Fine motor skills require both sides of the brain and most 2-6 year olds are still developing this skill (pg. |
|241). He will choose a hand to use predominantly at about age 6 and he will soon be able to hop on either foot (pg. 238). You shouldn’t |
|encourage him to use one hand over the other. You need to let him figure that out for himself. As far as what is age appropriate skills, 4 |
|year olds should be able to catch a small ball thrown slowly, use scissors to cut, hop on either foot, feed themselves with a fork, dress |
|themselves, copy most letters, pour juice without spilling, and brush their teeth (pg. 238). Girls are a little faster in developing motor |
|skills as they usually develop about six months quicker (pg. 241). |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|I’m a childcare worker for a large child care center. I’m worried about one of our little boys. He’s 18-months-old and moves around quite |
|well. However, he seems to always have bruises and scrapes on his forehead, hands, and legs. He doesn't talk much and plays by himself. |
|Yesterday he hit another child in order to get something he wanted. Could this aggression, the physical injuries, and his quiet solitary |
|behavior be signs of child abuse? What hard evidence do I need before I can report it? My co-worker doesn’t think it’s any big deal. Could we |
|get in trouble for not reporting it? |
| |
|Bewildered by Bruises in Billington (Chapter 8, Letter 4) |
| |
|Dear Bewildered by Bruises, |
| |
|The signs of abuse or child maltreatment are these: repeated injuries, fantasy play with dominant themes of violence or sexual knowledge, slow|
|physical growth, lack of appetite or unusual appetite, ongoing physical complaints such as stomach aches, reluctance to talk, play, or move, |
|no close friendships, bullying of other children, hypervigilance with impulsive reactions such as cringing or hitting, and injuries that do |
|not fit accidents such as bruising on both sides of face or cuts not scrapes. Your observations fit these descriptions and you need to be |
|concerned. At the very least this child is living in a disrupted home (pg. 250-252). You have evidence enough. You can report it, but you also|
|need to provide high-quality care to this child to help him through his development (pg. 251-252). You may not get in trouble but you |
|definitely have the responsibility to report the abuse or maltreatment. You cannot stand idly by and let this happen if you know that it is |
|going on (pg. 247). |
| |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|I had the funniest thing happen the other day. My daughter was upset because her sister had more pennies than she had. Without giving her any |
|more pennies, I spread out her pennies so there was more distance between them. She suddenly calmed. My husband thought she just wanted the |
|attention of someone interacting with her. But I think she calmed down because she actually thought there were more pennies when they were |
|spread out. What do you think? Do you know why she acted the way she did? |
| |
|More in Montana (Chapter 9, Letter 2) |
| |
|Dear More, |
| |
|You are right when you say that you think your daughter actually thought there were more pennies. She really believes that. It is because your|
|daughter’s preoperational intelligence trumps logic. She doesn’t understand that things don’t change when put in different containers or |
|spread out. This will happen if you put water from one glass into a skinnier glass, she will think that you gave her more water. She will also|
|freak out if both her and her friend get two crackers but her friend gets a bigger cup to put them in. She will think that there is more in |
|her friend’s cup (pg. 259). |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|I am so frustrated with my son. He has taken picky to a whole new level. I was making a sandwich for him and accidently put some pickles on |
|it. He quickly informed me he didn’t like pickles, so I took them off his sandwich. But he wouldn’t touch the sandwich even when I’d taken the|
|pickles off for him. What is his problem? How should I deal with it? |
| |
|Pickle Problems in (not-so) Pleasantville (Chapter 9, Letter 3) |
| |
|Dear Pickle Problems, |
| |
|Your son is displaying what is called irreversibility. This is one fails to recognize that things can be undone. Your son believes that the |
|pickles cannot be taken off of the sandwich. He saw the pickles go onto the sandwich and he cannot fathom that they can be taken off. This is |
|also because they have static reasoning, which is the thought that the world is unchanging. This means that he can’t understand that tv shows |
|can’t be paused or that you were once a child as he was. You need to deal with it understanding how he thinks. You might need to make a new |
|sandwich and you must be patient with him. He doesn’t understand as you and I do, that things can be changed (pg. 258-259). |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|My husband jokingly said, “It is all right to talk to yourself as long as you don’t answer back.” But I’m worried about my four-year-old son. |
|He seems to always talk to himself and does so more when he is working on something. Why do children verbalize what they are doing? Will he |
|change or is it just his personality? |
| |
|Verbal in Vermont (Chapter 9, Letter 5) |
| |
|Dear Verbal, |
| |
|Your son is doing this as a way to learn and to increase his development. It is called private speech. Most people and kids do this. Most kids|
|do this without realizing that they are doing it. They use this to review, decide, and explain events to themselves. This aids their cognition|
|and self-reflection. This act is to be encouraged by parents. Your son will change but will always talk to himself on occasion, as I’m sure |
|you and I still do. He will just become more selective in when he talks. He will most likely start to whisper instead (pg. 263-264). |
| |
| |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|My husband plays rougher with our preschooler than I’d like him to. I’m afraid that such play will model aggressive behavior. My husband |
|thinks I’m being too “girly” with him because I let him play dress-up games and let him play with his sister’s baby doll. We’re both worried |
|that he doesn’t play very interactively with others. He just does his own thing. What advice do you have for our play problems? |
| |
|Play Problems in Portland (Chapter 10, Letter 2) |
| |
|Dear Play Problems, |
| |
|Your husband is perfectly fine playing rough with your son. Rough-and-Tumble play is perfectly acceptable and has many positives to it. Some |
|scientists believe that it helps your son’s prefrontal cortex develop. They also believe that it teaches children to regulate emotions, |
|practice social skills, and strengthen their bodies. Specifically play between a son and his father can help regulate aggression but may |
|prevent antisocial behavior and murder (pg. 296-297). Your son is also fine playing with supposed “girly” toys. He will grow out of it when he|
|chooses to and he is still learning valuable things by playing with those toys. Don’t worry about him playing alone. Generally kids will play |
|alone until they develop more. Then they will start to interact more with others. My advice to you is to let him figure it out himself and |
|continue to let him play how he wants to (pg. 294-298). |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|My wife doesn’t want to spank our children. She thinks it will cause emotional damage or problems later in life. I was spanked as a child, and|
|it didn’t bother me. Sometimes it seems that spanking is just the right thing to do. For example, what do you do when a child runs out in the |
|street? It seems that children who aren’t spanked turn out to be spoiled little brats. Spanking doesn’t have to be severe—it can be a gentle |
|swat on the backside. What suggestions do you have on spanking? |
| |
|Spanking in Spokane (Chapter 10, Letter 4) |
| |
|Dear Spanking, |
| |
|Spanking may seem like it works and it might temporarily, but over time it can be detrimental. Studies have shown that spanking may cause |
|children to grow up to be delinquents, bullies, and abusive adults. They also can become slower learners in school. Your child learns that |
|through might or physical strength they can get what they want. Now spanking isn’t guaranteed to cause these things, but most |
|developmentalists agree that it is not worth the risk (pg. 307-308). There are other forms of punishment that do not have the risks associated|
|with them. Timeouts can be used effectively as long as they are properly administered. Also conversations with older kids on why what they did|
|was wrong, and how what they did hurt someone, tend to work. But there is no one solution (pg. 308-309). You and your wife need to figure out |
|what works best for you and for your children. |
| |
| |
|Dear Abby, |
| |
|We have two children, ages two and four. I know too much television is not helpful, but it seems there are many good educational programs that|
|can help them learn. We also have a computer with interactive games that help fine motor skills. What is recommended for children when it |
|comes to the amount and types of media usage? What rules or precautions might be helping in monitoring the media in our home? Is Baby Einstein|
|a helpful program? |
| |
|Sitting for Sesame Street in Salem (Chapter 10, Letter 6) |
| |
|Dear Sitting for Sesame Street, |
| |
|Your children’s media consumption is really up to you. Educational programs have proven to be helpful and there really is no strict guide for |
|how long your child should or shouldn’t watch television. But for every minute spent watching television or playing computer games, a minute |
|is lost that could have been spent doing something else. My suggestion or rule would be if your child could be doing something more |
|constructive with his or her time at the moment. If not, then go ahead and let them watch or play something educational. Try to keep it at a |
|reasonable amount of time. As to whether Baby Einstein is helpful, that is also up to you. If you feel that it helps your child learn, than it|
|is helpful. But you should be there to help facilitate learning. That way your child gets as much as possible from the program (pg. 303-304). |

-----------------------
Unit 3: Dear Abby Letters

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Dear Abby Unit 3

...Your name: Instructions Respond to three letters from each chapter. Draw information from the chapter while formulating your response; use correct terms and definitions. Reference information you use from the textbook by citing the page number. If you use information from outside the textbook, make sure it is credible and generally supported by the medical and scientific community. Avoid anecdotal evidence or opinion. Your written responses should be 2200-2500 cumulatively, or about four to five pages single-spaced (including the original Dear Abby Letter). | | |Dear Abby, | | | |My three-year-old is driving me crazy! He is so picky! He will only wear certain clothes. He is a very picky eater. I wonder if he is eating | |enough. He’s getting much thinner and doesn't eat as much as he did when he was younger. This morning, he had a fit because I gave him a new | |toothbrush that was a different color than his old one. Have I done something to make him so picky? What should I do to prevent him from | |becoming a spoiled brat? ...

Words: 2311 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

The Bioecological Model of Human Development

...SIOP® LESSON PLANS Grade 9/SIFE Reading/Language Arts/Writing Unit/Theme: Emotions and The House on Mango Street *Content Objective(s): *Students will describe Cisneros’ voice and style, listing some of her creative uses of language as characteristic of this author’s craft*Students will explore the physical and emotional prisons in which people live. *Students will discover and evaluate different methods of escape from these prisons. *Students will practice writing in the persuasive mode, using evidence from the text and from their own lives to construct effective arguments proposing the best way to escape the troubles of life*Students will peer edit and revise for content, for sentence structure, and for use of figurative language. *Language Objective(s): *Students will continue to build vocabulary resources for discussing emotions. *Students will identify fragmentary sentence structure, voice, and effective use of figurative language in Cisneros’ style and use knowledge of style to develop originality in their own writing style. *Student will be able to participate in and contribute to collaborative learning, such as “think, pair, share” and “expert groups.” Key Vocabulary: prison, escape, safe haven, voice, style, figurative language, persuasive mode, context, concept map, anticipatory set, peer editing, rubric, tapping prior knowledge, description, sensory detail, quotation, five senses, , sentence fragments, “unacceptable in academic writing,” punctuation,...

Words: 2737 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

The Film

...[pic] The Firm John Grisham [pic] • Chapter 1 • Chapter 2 • Chapter 3 • Chapter 4 • Chapter 5 • Chapter 6 • Chapter 7 • Chapter 8 • Chapter 9 • Chapter 10 • Chapter 11 • Chapter 12 • Chapter 13 • Chapter 14 • Chapter 15 • Chapter 16 • Chapter 17 • Chapter 18 • Chapter 19 • Chapter 20 • Chapter 21 • Chapter 22 • Chapter 23 • Chapter 24 • Chapter 25 • Chapter 26 • Chapter 27 • Chapter 28 • Chapter 29 • Chapter 30 • Chapter 31 • Chapter 32 • Chapter 33 • Chapter 34 • Chapter 35 • Chapter 36 • Chapter 37 • Chapter 38 • Chapter 39 • Chapter 40 • Chapter 41 • About the Arthor The Firm by John Grisham Chapter 1    The senior partner studied the resume for the hundredth time and again found nothing he disliked about Mitchell Y. McDeere, at least not on paper. He had the brains, the ambition, the good looks. And he was hungry; with his background, he had to be. He was married, and that was mandatory. The Firm had never hired an unmarried lawyer, and it frowned heavily on divorce, as well as womanizing and drinking. Drug testing was in the contract. He had a degree in accounting, passed the CPA exam the first time he took it and wanted to be a tax lawyer, which of course was a requirement with a tax firm. He was white, and The Firm had never hired a black.......

Words: 137089 - Pages: 549

Premium Essay

Critical Thinking

...Part II Asking Analytical Questions using Elements of Reasoning Introduction to Critical Thinking What do we do to think critically? What is critical thinking? 3 Key Questions Why do we need critical thinking? The Three Dimensions of Critical Thinking Reasoning: three aspects Traits of the Disciplined Mind Reasoning The process of drawing conclusions or figuring something out Elements of Reasoning Standards for Reasoning The quality of our thinking is largely reflected in the quality of our questions. Circle – Dots Critical thinking is the way you do everything you do Instruction Content LOGIC OF Student Thinking StandardsElementsTraits In other words, what elements must you account for in order for the analysis to be substantive? What is involved in analyzing reasoning? (Story, argument, point of view, subject) ● Look at the cartoon and analyze it by asking questions. 1. Individually, write a series of questions that attempt to probe the meaning of the cartoon. 2. With a group, compare your questions with others. Add to your list. Analyzing a Cartoon We use data, facts, and experiences to make inferences and judgments based on concepts and theories based on assumptions within a point of view leading to implications and conse quences. in attempting to We think answer a for a question. purpose Whenever we think Elements wheel ...

Words: 3431 - Pages: 14

Free Essay

Vampire

...PRAISE FOR AUTHORS Merline Lovelace “Merline Lovelace’s Mind Games is an exciting and skillfully told tale.” —RT Book Reviews Lori Devoti “Lori Devoti provides yet another action-packed mythological tale.” —RT Book Reviews on Wild Hunt Linda Winstead Jones “Raintree: Haunted, by Linda Winstead Jones, is nonstop action from start to finish.” —RT Book Reviews Lisa Childs “In Childs’s gripping tale…there are some surprising twists.” —RT Book Reviews Bonnie Vanak “Bonnie Vanak’s Enemy Lover offers nonstop excitement and great sexual tension.” —RT Book Reviews CHRISTMAS WITH A VAMPIRE Merline Lovelace Lori Devoti Linda Winstead Jones Lisa Childs Bonnie Vanak CONTENTS A CHRISTMAS KISS Merline Lovelace ABOUT THE AUTHOR CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN THE VAMPIRE WHO STOLE CHRISTMAS Lori Devoti ABOUT THE AUTHOR CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT CHAPTER NINE CHAPTER TEN CHAPTER ELEVEN SUNDOWN Linda Winstead Jones ABOUT THE AUTHOR CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE EPILOGUE NOTHING SAYS CHRISTMAS LIKE A VAMPIRE Lisa Childs ABOUT THE AUTHOR CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT CHAPTER NINE UNWRAPPED Bonnie Vanak ABOUT THE AUTHOR CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT CHAPTER NINE...

Words: 112350 - Pages: 450

Premium Essay

Asdfgnhdgh

...they offer a structured, seven-step corpusbased approach to discourse analysis that results in generalizable descriptions of discourse structure. This article draws on the themes in this book, but focuses in particular on analyses that use theories on communicative or functional purposes of text as the starting point for understanding why texts in a corpus are structured the way they are, before moving to a closer examination and description of the linguistic characteristics and overall organizational tendencies reflective of the corpus. Biber et al. (2007) refer to this as a ‘top-down approach’ to the analysis of discourse structure. (In a bottom-up approach, the lexical and/ or form-focused corpus analysis comes first, and the discourse unit types emerge from the corpus patterns. See Biber et al., 2007, for discussion.) The primary...

Words: 8985 - Pages: 36

Premium Essay

Ibm's Decade of Transformation: Turnaround to Growth

...9-805-130 REV: JULY 8, 2009 LYNDA M. APPLEGATE ROBERT AUSTIN ELIZABETH COLLINS IBM's Decade of Transformation: Turnaround to Growth This is my last annual letter to you. By the time you read this, Sam Palmisano will be our new chief executive officer, the eighth in IBM’s history. He will be responsible for shaping our strategic direction as well as leading our operations. . . . I want to use this occasion to offer my perspective on what lies ahead for our industry. To many observers today, its future is unclear, following perhaps the worst year in its history. A lot of people chalk that up to the recession and the “dot-com bubble.” They seem to believe that when the economies of the world recover, life in the information technology industry will get back to normal. In my view, nothing could be further from the truth. Lou Gerstner, IBM Annual Report, 2001 In 1990, IBM was the second-most-profitable company in the world, with net income of $6 billion on revenues of $69 billion, and it was completing a transformation designed to position it for success in the next decade. For the world leader in an industry that expected to keep growing spectacularly, the future looked promising. But all was not well within IBM, and its senior executives realized it. “In 1990, we were feeling pretty good because things seemed to be getting better,” one executive remarked. “But we weren’t feeling great because we knew there were deep structural problems.” Those structural problems......

Words: 13418 - Pages: 54

Premium Essay

Ibm's Decade of Transformation Turnaround to Growth

...9-805-130 REV: JULY 8, 2009 LYNDA M. APPLEGATE ROBERT AUSTIN ELIZABETH COLLINS IBM's Decade of Transformation: Turnaround to Growth This is my last annual letter to you. By the time you read this, Sam Palmisano will be our new chief executive officer, the eighth in IBM’s history. He will be responsible for shaping our strategic direction as well as leading our operations. . . . I want to use this occasion to offer my perspective on what lies ahead for our industry. To many observers today, its future is unclear, following perhaps the worst year in its history. A lot of people chalk that up to the recession and the “dot-com bubble.” They seem to believe that when the economies of the world recover, life in the information technology industry will get back to normal. In my view, nothing could be further from the truth. Lou Gerstner, IBM Annual Report, 2001 In 1990, IBM was the second-most-profitable company in the world, with net income of $6 billion on revenues of $69 billion, and it was completing a transformation designed to position it for success in the next decade. For the world leader in an industry that expected to keep growing spectacularly, the future looked promising. But all was not well within IBM, and its senior executives realized it. “In 1990, we were feeling pretty good because things seemed to be getting better,” one executive remarked. “But we weren’t feeling great because we knew there were deep structural problems.” Those structural problems......

Words: 13417 - Pages: 54

Free Essay

Reading Strategies

...3-12 Reading Strategies 3-12 Reading Strategies __________________________________________________________________________________ VIRGINIA P. ROJAS Language Education Consultant (732) 940-1860 VPRojas@aol.com 3-12 Reading Strategies Anticipation Guides (Barton & Heidema, 2000) - Anticipation guides have two columns labeled ‘me’ and ‘text.’ Before reading the text, students place a check next to any statement with which they agree. After reading the text, students compare their opinions with information contained in the text. Examples: An example for a math anticipation guide on statistics might look like the following: Me ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Text ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 1. There are several kinds of averages for a set of data. 2. The mode is the middle number in a set of data. 3. Range tells how far apart numbers in a data set can be. 4. Outliers are always ignored. 5. Averages are always given as percentages. An example for a science anticipation guide on matter might look like the following: Me ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Text ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Matter is made up of elements. An element is made up of many different atoms. An element is the same thing as a compound. Most compounds are made up of molecules. Elements are represented by chemical symbols. Check Those Facts! (Stephens & Brown, 2005) - This strategy serves a dual purpose: to help students become better judges of internet information and to allow students to explore an area of interest related......

Words: 9552 - Pages: 39

Premium Essay

Mankiw Solutions

...constraints they face. For example, households choose which goods to purchase in order to maximize their utility, whereas firms decide how much to produce in order to maximize profits. In contrast, macroeconomics is the study of the economy as a whole; it focuses on issues such as how total output, total employment, and the overall price level are determined. These economy-wide variables are based on the interaction of many households and many firms; therefore, microeconomics forms the basis for macroeconomics. 2. Economists build models as a means of summarizing the relationships among economic variables. Models are useful because they abstract from the many details in the economy and allow one to focus on the most important economic connections. 3. A market-clearing model is one in which prices adjust to equilibrate supply and demand. Market-clearing models are useful in situations where prices are flexible. Yet in many situations, flexible prices may not be a realistic assumption. For example, labor contracts often set wages for up to three years. Or, firms such as magazine publishers change their prices only every three to four years. Most macroeconomists believe that price flexibility is a reasonable assumption for studying long-run issues. Over the long run, prices respond to changes in demand or supply, even though in the short run they may be slow to adjust. Problems and Applications 1. The many recent macroeconomic issues that have been in the news lately (early......

Words: 58794 - Pages: 236

Premium Essay

Test

...(Bike) Kawasaki Ninja 250R ET NOW Zigwheels Award 2009 250cc Bike of the Year Kawasaki Ninja 250R Business Standard Motoring 2010 Motoring Bike of the Year Kawasaki Ninja 250R IMOTY 2010 Indian Motorcycle of the Year Pulsar Mania E e Awards 2009 Category: Consumer Durables Recent awards for our products Kawasaki Ninja 250R NDTV Pro t Car & Bike Awards 2010 Two Wheeler of the Year Bajaj Auto NDTV Pro t Car & Bike Awards 2010 Best Integrated Campaign 2 Wheeler Kawasaki Ninja 250R NDTV Pro t Car & Bike Awards 2010 Motorcycle of the Year up to 250cc CONTENTS Management Team ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Chairman’s Letter ................................................................................................................................................... 4 Management Discussion and Analysis .......................................................................................................... 7 Corporate Governance ......................................................................................................................................15 General Shareholder Information .................................................................................................................21 Directors’ Report......

Words: 43384 - Pages: 174

Premium Essay

Macroeconomics

...User SONPR:Job EFF01417:6264_ch01:Pg 0:23907#/eps at 100% *23907* Fri, Nov 9, 2001 11:52 AM part I Introduction User SONPR:Job EFF01417:6264_ch01:Pg 1:21266#/eps at 100% *21266* Fri, Nov 9, 2001 11:52 AM C H A P T E R The Science of Macroeconomics The whole of science is nothing more than the refinement of everyday thinking. — Albert Einstein 1 O N E 1-1 What Macroeconomists Study Why have some countries experienced rapid growth in incomes over the past century while others stay mired in poverty? Why do some countries have high rates of inflation while others maintain stable prices? Why do all countries experience recessions and depressions—recurrent periods of falling incomes and rising unemployment—and how can government policy reduce the frequency and severity of these episodes? Macroeconomics, the study of the economy as a whole, attempts to answer these and many related questions. To appreciate the importance of macroeconomics, you need only read the newspaper or listen to the news. Every day you can see headlines such as INCOME GROWTH SLOWS, FED MOVES TO COMBAT INFLATION, or STOCKS FALL AMID RECESSION FEARS. Although these macroeconomic events may seem abstract, they touch all of our lives. Business executives forecasting the demand for their products must guess how fast consumers’ incomes will grow. Senior citizens living on fixed incomes wonder how fast prices will rise. Recent college graduates looking for jobs hope that the economy...

Words: 188819 - Pages: 756

Premium Essay

Macroeconomics

...User SONPR:Job EFF01417:6264_ch01:Pg 0:23907#/eps at 100% *23907* Fri, Nov 9, 2001 11:52 AM part I Introduction User SONPR:Job EFF01417:6264_ch01:Pg 1:21266#/eps at 100% *21266* Fri, Nov 9, 2001 11:52 AM C H A P T E R The Science of Macroeconomics The whole of science is nothing more than the refinement of everyday thinking. — Albert Einstein 1 O N E 1-1 What Macroeconomists Study Why have some countries experienced rapid growth in incomes over the past century while others stay mired in poverty? Why do some countries have high rates of inflation while others maintain stable prices? Why do all countries experience recessions and depressions—recurrent periods of falling incomes and rising unemployment—and how can government policy reduce the frequency and severity of these episodes? Macroeconomics, the study of the economy as a whole, attempts to answer these and many related questions. To appreciate the importance of macroeconomics, you need only read the newspaper or listen to the news. Every day you can see headlines such as INCOME GROWTH SLOWS, FED MOVES TO COMBAT INFLATION, or STOCKS FALL AMID RECESSION FEARS. Although these macroeconomic events may seem abstract, they touch all of our lives. Business executives forecasting the demand for their products must guess how fast consumers’ incomes will grow. Senior citizens living on fixed incomes wonder how fast prices will rise. Recent college graduates looking for jobs hope that the economy...

Words: 188818 - Pages: 756

Premium Essay

The Blak Dagger Brotherhood

...Color-- -1- -2- -3- -4- -5- -6- -7- -8- -9- Text Size-- 10-- 11-- 12-- 13-- 14-- 15-- 16-- 17-- 18-- 19-- 20-- 21-- 22-- 23-- 24 Dark Lover A Novel of the Black Dagger Brotherhood By J.R. Ward Contents Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen Chapter Seventeen Chapter Eighteen Chapter Nineteen Chapter Twenty Chapter Twenty-one Chapter Twenty-two Chapter Twenty-three Chapter Twenty-four Chapter Twenty-five Chapter Twenty-six Chapter Twenty-seven Chapter Twenty-eight Chapter Twenty-nine Chapter Thirty Chapter Thirty-one Chapter Thirty-two Chapter Thirty-three Chapter Thirty-four Chapter Thirty-five Chapter Thirty-six Chapter Thirty-seven Chapter Thirty-eight Chapter Thirty-nine Chapter Forty Chapter Forty-one Chapter Forty-two Chapter Forty-three Chapter Forty-four Chapter Forty-five Chapter Forty-six Chapter Forty-seven Chapter Forty-eight Chapter Forty-nine Chapter Fifty Chapter Fifty-one Chapter Fifty-two Chapter Fifty-three Chapter Fifty-four Chapter Fifty-five Epilogue A dangerous passion… Wrath walked into the hall, feeling particularly ferocious. Man, Beth had better be alive and well. Or God help whoever had hurt her. And if she'd decided to avoid him? That didn't matter. Her body was about to need something only he could provide her. So sooner or later she would......

Words: 121508 - Pages: 487

Premium Essay

Business

...C h a p t e r 1 Prewriting GETTING STARTED (OR SOUP-CAN LABELS CAN BE FASCINATING) For many writers, getting started is the hardest part. You may have noticed that when it is time to begin a writing assignment, you suddenly develop an enormous desire to straighten your books, water your plants, or sharpen your pencils for the fifth time. If this situation sounds familiar, you may find it reassuring to know that many professionals undergo these same strange compulsions before they begin writing. Jean Kerr, author of Please Don’t Eat the Daisies, admits that she often finds herself in the kitchen reading soup-can labels—or anything—in order to prolong the moments before taking pen in hand. John C. Calhoun, vice president under Andrew Jackson, insisted he had to plow his fields before he could write, and Joseph Conrad, author of Lord Jim and other novels, is said to have cried on occasion from the sheer dread of sitting down to compose his stories. To spare you as much hand-wringing as possible, this chapter presents some practical suggestions on how to begin writing your short essay. Although all writers must find the methods that work best for them, you may find some of the following ideas helpful. But no matter how you actually begin putting words on paper, it is absolutely essential to maintain two basic ideas concerning your writing task. Before you write a single sentence, you should always remind yourself that 1. You have some valuable ideas to tell your reader,...

Words: 234754 - Pages: 940