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Deflation

In: Business and Management

Submitted By simmybs
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Module 6 Inflation has traditionally been a concern of the Federal Reserve. Recently, there has been the possibility of deflation. Should the Fed be concerned with deflation of prices?
Although deflation was a concern in 2009 and earlier periods, it is not of concern in 2012. 2009 was ruled by deflation. It began with -0.38% in March, 2009 and ended in October, 2009 with a -0.18 deflation rate. An indicator that deflation was on the horizon manifested in 2007, with high inflationary rates in November (4.31%). If one follows the same pattern of inflation rates to determine the probability of us experiencing deflation, it would take at least one to two years . InflationData.co mCurrent Annual Inflation Rate
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Ave
2012 2.93% 2.87% NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
2011 1.63% 2.11% 2.68% 3.16% 3.57% 3.56% 3.63% 3.77% 3.87% 3.53% 3.39% 2.96% 3.16%
2010 2.63% 2.14% 2.31% 2.24% 2.02% 1.05% 1.24% 1.15% 1.14% 1.17% 1.14% 1.50% 1.64%
2009 0.03% 0.24% -0.38% -0.74% -1.28% -1.43% -2.10% -1.48% -1.29% -0.18% 1.84% 2.72% -0.34%
2008 4.28% 4.03% 3.98% 3.94% 4.18% 5.02% 5.60% 5.37% 4.94% 3.66% 1.07% 0.09% 3.85%
2007 2.08% 2.42% 2.78% 2.57% 2.69% 2.69% 2.36% 1.97% 2.76% 3.54% 4.31% 4.08% 2.85%
2006 3.99% 3.60% 3.36% 3.55% 4.17% 4.32% 4.15% 3.82% 2.06% 1.31% 1.97% 2.54% 3.24%
2005 2.97% 3.01% 3.15% 3.51% 2.80% 2.53% 3.17% 3.64% 4.69% 4.35% 3.46% 3.42% 3.39%
2004 1.93% 1.69% 1.74% 2.29% 3.05% 3.27% 2.99% 2.65% 2.54% 3.19% 3.52% 3.26% 2.68%
2003 2.60% 2.98% 3.02% 2.22% 2.06% 2.11% 2.11% 2.16% 2.32% 2.04% 1.77% 1.88% 2.27%
2002 1.14% 1.14% 1.48% 1.64% 1.18% 1.07% 1.46% 1.80% 1.51% 2.03% 2.20% 2.38% 1.59%
2001 3.73% 3.53% 2.92% 3.27% 3.62% 3.25% 2.72% 2.72% 2.65% 2.13% 1.90% 1.55% 2.83%
2000 2.74% 3.22% 3.76% 3.07% 3.19% 3.73% 3.66% 3.41% 3.45% 3.45% 3.45% 3.39% 3.38%
Yellow shaded area are periods of deflation....

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